Chronique des fouilles en ligne
Respecter   tous les
  au moins un
critère(s) de recherche    Plus une Moins une Remise à zéro

Dernières notices ajoutées par région : Macédoine de l'Est
Kimmeria. D. Makropoulou (Director, 15th EBA) reports the discovery of a previously unknown ECh (probably  6th Ct AD) basilica (15m x 13m).

Lire la suite
Komotini. D. Makropoulou (Director, 15th EBA) reports the discovery on Venizelos street of traces of a Byz cemetery and a cistern. Within the city, a previously unknown 14th Ct AD bath with a hypocaust has been located, the construction of which is perhaps to be attributed to Gazi Evrenos.

Lire la suite
Via Egnatia.  D. Kaimari (Aristotelian University, Thessaloniki), in association with G. Karadedos, O. Georgoula and P. Patias, reports on the use of satellite technology to trace the route of the Via Egnatia and to identify likely archaeological sites along it, which were then tested with trial trenches. The 45km stretch from Amphipolis to Philippoi was traced in detail and 300 new sites identified along the length of the road.

Lire la suite
Karyanis (Kavala).  P. Malama (ΙΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports the discovery by the coast of a rectangular building of uncertain (but probably public) function, dating to the end of the 6th Ct BC.

Lire la suite
Didymoteicho Kalé. Ethnos (08/03/2008) cites the report of D. Makropoulou (Director, 15th EBA) of the discovery during cleaning of rock-cut chambers used for worship.

Lire la suite
Dikili Tash.  P. Darcque (EfA/CNRS), Ch. Koukouli-Chrysanthaki (ASA), D. Malamidou (ΙΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) and Z. Tsirtsoni (CNRS/EfA) report on the first season of a 3rd programme of collaborative excavation, which aims to bring together information enabling reconstruction of the birth of the tell in the Neo period and its evolution into mod. times.  During this first campaign, research was confined to 3 sectors where new findings could be obtained to answer the main research questions posed (Fig. 1). At the foot of the S slope of the tell, a first intervention aimed to trace the possible limit of the PH settlement.  Under the hillwash, stones appeared in the S part of the trench, mixed with LNeo and EBA sherds and bones: these look more like a mass of fallen rocks than a continuation of the weathering discovered during the 2nd programme of excavation.  It is possible that the preserved limits of the tell lie here.  Part of a Neo vase decorated with an applied anthropomorphic figure was discovered in this sector (Fig. 2). In sector 6, it was hoped to reveal the continuation of house 1 (LNeo II) as well as levels of the LNeo−EBA transition. Apart from the unexpected discovery of a silver tetradrachm of Alexander III (struck in the royal mint of Amphipolis between 315−294 BC), the continuation of house 1 appeared in the location expected, covered by a thick destruction layer, recognizable from the colour of the burnt daub.  This lay under the EBA level which produced a hearth as well as silos, the walls of which were covered with a white coating.  In the SW of the excavated area, lying on a hearth, was an intact, two-headed zoomorphic figurine, ca. 0.2m l. (Fig. 3).  The type is rare both at Dikili Tash and in the Aegean world in general, and the discovery of such an item in situ is exceptional. In sector 7, close to the top of the tell, the main objective was to explore the possible successor to a LBA house discovered in this area.  But before reaching this house, excavation in sector 7 exposed a sequence of occupation levels of this period which produced abundant finds: several bronze objects, including the complete blade of a small dagger, and a fragment of a cup with painted decoration imitating a Myc type (the first discovered at Dikili Tash).  LBA occupation was thus not a short episode in the life of the PH settlement, but had several phases, lending it a rather different historical significance than hitherto recognized. 

Lire la suite
Piges tou Angiti, Cave.  K. Trantalidou (EPSNE), V. Skaraki (Β΄ ΕΠΚΑ) and E. Kara (Α΄ ΕΠΚΑ) publish the pottery assemblage from the interior of this cave. The site lies at the source of the river Angitis (the W tributary of the Strymon river), in the S foothills of Mt Falakrou, 25km W of Drama and at an elevation of 129m.  The cave is an almost horizontal, gallery-like karst formation, estimated at 9−12km l., which widens occasionally into chambers and through which the river Angitis flows.  Traces of sporadic human occupation have been located in the first chamber, through which the complex is entered: 2 small steps were cut in the SE area.  The PH fill covered an area of ca. 100m2, to an average d. of 0.3m. Four round hearths, located on 2 small level areas and bounded with unworked limestone blocks, were foci of human activity. Small pits for ash and rubbish were associated with them.  In total, 3,456 sherds, 9 terracotta weights, an undecorated miniature vessel, 757 animal bones of domesticated and wild species, 4 tools and items of shell ornament, and a necklace of wild-boar teeth were found.  The pottery is mostly monochrome (with burnished, smoothed and incised surface treatment), thick-walled andmade of local clay.  Mostly household shapes are represented: the monochrome wares divide into shallow open (35.7%), deep open (4.5%), open storage shapes (47.6%) and closed vessels (9.2%).  Only ca. 1% of the pottery bears painted, linear decoration (3 rims of open vessels, a handle of a closed shape and 23 body sherds of open and closed shapes). One sherd of an open light-on-dark ware vessel was found. Ceramic shapes and painted decoration show influences from a wide area, from the Danube, Aegean Thrace, the plain of Drama, the Strymon valley and as far as E Thessaly.  Pottery indicates seasonal occupation from the LNeo/FNeo−EH period.

Lire la suite
Krinides. T. Salonikios (ΙΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports the discovery, in the course of the construction of an extension to the water supply network to the village of Krinides, of 5 unlooted Rom tombs, plus funerary monuments which had been opened and some Byz artefacts. The tombs are cist graves with tile covers.  The site lies close to anc. Philippoi: the mod. village of Krinides is built over the anc. city of the same name.

Lire la suite
Thasos. Area N of the Artemision. A. Muller (EfA/Lille 3), F. Blondé (EfA/CNRS) and S. Dadaki (12th EBA) report on an excavation season conducted in collaboration with the 12th EBA, the ΙΗ' ΕΠΚΑ and the University of Athens.  Excavation focused on an extensive EByz residence which has been explored in stages since 1971: this structure suffered severe disturbance in ca. 570 and was finally destroyed in 619 or slightly later (Fig. 1). In the triclinium of the E wing, the fill laid down just before the final destruction was excavated; this held 2 heaps of fragments of a pebble pavement in opus signinum.  The extent of the neighbouring courtyard was explored only in a narrow strip.  Two installations were discovered which were used successively during the last phase of occupation: a large built vat of uncertain function was largely covered by a large domestic oven which was relatively well preserved. The most important part of the season’s work was conducted in the N wing (Fig. 2).  Beyond the corner room, the N wing is formed of a row of 4 rooms of different sizes and appearances.  The 2 W rooms are distinguished by the richness of their decor.  Room 20 has a pavement of white pebbles set in red-tinted mortar.  Its central decorative area, in opus spicatum crossed by two diagonals, had at the centre a mosaic emblema now lost; all round, a large border included, in front of the entrance, a doormat of wine-coloured pebbles.  The corner room (21) is exceptional as much for its size (6.3m x 9.3m) as for the richness of its decor: the W part was paved with mosaic and with marble slabs at the foot of the walls, and in the E part it is at least possible to detect the treatment of the N wall, which had a yellow surface treatment. For the first time in this sector it was possible to identify remains of reoccupation of the site after a long period of abandonment. In the area of room 20, there was an Ot workshop, perhaps a lime-burning establishment, consisting of a pit and two summarily built kilns.  The level containing these kilns held plentiful evidence for the existence of a potter’s workshop in the area, also of the Ot period. In addition to the many architectural members from the residence, notable discoveries include a fragment of an acroterion depicting a running peplophoros, found in 1983 in the S area, a Hel female head and, especially, a Rom relief (1.1m h.), the iconography of which is heroic in character (Fig. 3). The macellum. J.-Y. Marc (EfA/Strasbourg) reports on the 2008 study season. The identification of a glass manufacturer’s workshop in room 57 was confirmed by finds including numerous fragments of unworked glass, blowing tubes and wasters.  The presence of a bronze workshop in room 54 is also confirmed by finds including numerous mould fragments, remains of furnace wall, crucible fragments and many pieces of slag; the presence of many forging slags also indicates that iron working took place here. Study of the wall decoration continued, and focused on the walls of the Ionic passage, i.e. the monumental entrance to the macellum from the agora.  A fortunate discovery led to the study of a fountain mechanism in the court of the hundred flagstones.  A mysterious, roughly circular marble block can be explained as coming from the lower part of a marble labrum, thanks to comparison with identical blocks from Rome, displayed in the Museum of the Imperial Fora.  The basin was set over the well in the court of the hundred flagstones. 

Lire la suite
Glyfada, Mesi.  G. Koutsouflakis (EMA) undertook a preliminary survey of a site off the coast of the village of Glyfada, Mesi, which had been reported to the Archaeological Service by a local resident.  A hoard of EBA bronze tools was located and subsequently retrieved 450m from the coast and at a d. of 3.5m, concentrated in an area no greater than 10m2.  One hundred and ten tools had been identified at the time of writing, with more remaining to be disengaged from the mass in which they were found.  These are almost exclusively percussion tools, especially a type of double axe with 2 percussion surfaces which occurs in 3 different sizes.  The presence of lath-hammers and single-bladed axes is attested in smaller numbers, as well as fragments of tools of unidentified type.  Below the tools, sunk down into the sea bed, were 2 bases of EH vessels, which probably contained the hoard: mat impressions were also found in a mass of bronze.  This is the largest EH hoard of tools so far found in Greece or the neighbouring Balkans.  There is no evidence at present to link it with a shipwreck nor are there settlement remains nearby.  The details of the context combine to indicate that the hoard was most probably deliberately concealed in a coastal location which was then on dry land.  In addition to providing information about metalworking styles and techniques in the S Balkans during the EBA, this discovery also promises to shed light on the physical development of this area of coast.

Lire la suite
Itea. The discovery is reported of a partially collapsed chamber tomb containing many vases, found during ploughing. The chamber is 1.7m x 2.45m, with a h. of 2.3m.  The date of the tomb was not confirmed at the time of the report.

Lire la suite
Potamos. S. Kiotsekoglou (Thrace) notes Neo surface remains (pottery, stone tools and debris of tool manufacture).

Lire la suite
Samothrace. Sanctuary of the Great Gods.  J. McCredie (ASCSA/New York) reports on the 2008 season of study and conservation.   In addition to ongoing projects previously reported (see AR 54 [2007−2008], 87), a digital survey of the sanctuary was begun.  A reconstruction of the Milesian Dedication on the western hill was also begun, alongside continuing work to document the associated architectural blocks. 

Lire la suite
Dans la commune moderne de Siviri, en Chalcidique, E.-B. Tsigarida et S. Vasileiou (XVIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a effectué une fouille de sauvetage sur le terrain Triantaphyllidis. Aucune structure précise n’a été identifiée, les travaux n’ayant livré qu’une couche de destruction étendue sur une bande de 30 m de longueur, recouverte d’une couche riche en matériel d’époque hellénistique. La couche supérieure comporte un grand nombre de tuiles en terre cuite, d’amphores (dont des anses timbrées du groupe de Parmeniskos, de Thasos, de Cos, de Cnide et de Rhodes), de fragments de pithoi, de fragments de céramique commune et à vernis noir. On signale des outils et accessoires de terre cuite habituellement associés à des ateliers céramiques. On recense aussi des pesons en terre cuite de forme conique, des fragments de plusieurs types de ruche en terre cuite à base plate et bord saillant et fin, des fragments de meules. Des monnaies, datées entre le règne de Philippe II et le milieu du IIe s. av. J.-C., permettent de dater la couche de l’époque hellénistique. L’assemblage du mobilier évoque un contexte de dépotoir. Ces vestiges sont à associer à une activité commerciale, artisanale ou agricole, peut-être liée à une fonction d’habitat, avec une part importante de stockage.

Lire la suite
À Kavala, dans le cadre de travaux de restauration de la mosquée Chalil Bey Tzami, S. Tanou et M. Lychounas (12e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) ont fouillé la basilique protobyzantine qui a précédé la mosquée : son abside, ses nefs centrale et Nord ainsi que son narthex ont été dégagés (fig. 1). Dans la nef centrale, la fouille a mis en évidence les vestiges d’un pavement de marbre, sous lequel ont été découvertes trois tombes à fosse et une tombe à ciste maçonnée. Celle-ci comportait une bague-sceau en or de l’époque romaine tardive ou protobyzantine et une boucle d’oreille en filigrane d’or. L’exploration de la nef Nord a montré qu’une nécropole a été aménagée dans cet espace après son abandon, à l’époque tardobyzantine (fin du XIIIe-XIVe s.). la datation est fournie par les monnaies recueillies dans des tombes à fosse et des tombes à ciste à sépultures successives. Quelques tombes comprenaient du mobilier : on signale notamment des boutons et des boucles d’oreille en bronze, un unguentarium en verre. Le mobilier recueilli sur l’ensemble de la fouille comprend de la céramique commune, difficile à dater, de la céramique à glaçure des XIIe-XIVe s. – parmi laquelle on signale de la céramique importée de type Zeuxippos –, des fragments architecturaux sculptés comme des plaques de chancel et d’ambon, des colonnettes et chapiteaux avec une encoche de fixation, des jambages, des linteaux, des meneaux. Ces fragments proviennent de deux ateliers distincts. Le plan basilical pourrait suggérer une construction à l’époque protobyzantine, mais la céramique de cette période est absente. Du reste, le premier état de l’abside et le plan de la basilique plaident davantage pour une construction au début de l’époque byzantine. Les placages de marbre, le décor sculpté et la céramique attestent un deuxième état.

Lire la suite
À Liménas, T. Kozelj et M. Wurch-Kozelf (École française d’Athènes) signalent la découverte fortuite de plusieurs éléments antiques : - plusieurs blocs de marbre : un fragment d’hydragogue perforé,  un bloc inscrit (dimensions: 0,306 x 0,28 m, hauteur 0,164 m) sur lequel on lit «ΝΙΚΗΣ ΟΥΚ ΝΕΟΙ», un  bloc de taille de marbre thasien trouvé en mer, devant le port « commercial » antique. On signale aussi un fragment d’une sculpture en marbre d’une figure assise (0,42 m de hauteur), inachevée. Sa tête est brisée. - plusieurs fragments de figurines : une figure masculine, une représentation de Pan, un cheval et un bélier. - un élément de pesée en bronze, composé d’une longue tige, d’un anneau et d’une extrémité octogonale (longueur 0,175 m).

Lire la suite
Dans la commune de Krenides, M. Nikolaïdou-Patéra et K. Amiridou (XVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) ont mené en 2008 une fouille de sauvetage sur le terrain Épitropaki (no 1251) et ont mis au jour six tombes à fosse. Les sépultures étaient orientées Est-Ouest ; au moins trois avaient été recouvertes de dalles de marbre ou de terre cuite. Dans deux cas, les mieux conservés, le défunt était allongé sur le dos, le bras le long du corps ou sur la poitrine. Cinq tombes ont livré des monnaies en bronze ; on a également recueilli des feuilles d’or, un strigile en fer, des clous en fer et une lampe à huile. La fouille a également livré une pyxide en terre cuite, un vase en verre et une monnaie romaine en bronze.

Lire la suite
Dans la commune de Krinidès, M. Nikolaïdou-Patéra et K. Amiridou (XVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) ont mené en 2008 une fouille de sauvetage sur les rues Aghiou Christophorou, M. Alexandrou et Philippou, dans le domaine de la nécropole orientale de l’antique Philippes. On a mis au jour 47 sépultures d’époques hellénistique, romaine et protobyzantine, ainsi que divers vestiges architecturaux. On a découvert 25 tombes à tuiles, 17 tombes à fosse simples ou recouvertes de dalles de marbre gris (ou, dans un cas, d’un couvercle en marbre de sarcophage en remploi), une tombe à ciste en dalles de terre cuite, une tombe maçonnée à voûte, un enchytrisme de nourrisson et deux vases cinéraires. Parmi celles-ci, deux sont datées au Ier s. av. J.-C. et 19 entre le Ier s. av. J.-C. et le Ier s. apr. J.-C., tandis que la tombe à voûte, dont l’entrée est à l’Est, date probablement du IVe s. de notre ère. Du mobilier a été trouvé dans 26 des sépultures : des vases en céramique et en verre, des monnaies en bronze, des perles de collier en verre et en bronze, des boucles d’oreille en bronze, une figurine féminine, une bague en pierre translucide ; une stèle funéraire à inscription latine y a également été découverte. Par ailleurs, on a dégagé une partie d’un bâtiment qui a livré deux monnaies romaines en bronze et de la céramique commune, un segment de mur d’enclos ayant vraisemblablement servi de péribole pour deux des sépultures découvertes, ainsi qu’une base et, plus loin, une structure à un espace, construites en moellons bruts et mortier de chaux ; les parois de la dernière étaient enduites, sur le côté intérieur, de mortier de chaux.

Lire la suite
Dans la commune de Lydia, M. Nikolaïdou-Patéra et K. Amiridou (XVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) ont mené en 2008 une fouille de sauvetage sur le terrain Gonatidis, dans le domaine de la nécropole occidentale de l’antique Philippes, mettant au jour onze sépultures romaines et les vestiges d’un édifice d’époque byzantine. On a découvert quatre tombes à tuiles, quatre tombes à fosse recouvertes de dalles de marbre gris, deux tombes à ciste entourées de tuiles et fragments de marbre verticaux et une fosse de bûcher primaire. Parmi ces sépultures, datées entre le Ier et le IIe s. apr. J.-C., cinq contenaient du mobilier. Vers l’Ouest, on a repéré des restes de structures – probablement de soubassement de murs – en moellons bruts et briques, ainsi qu’un substrat de sol en cailloux, briques, tessons et os ; sur ce dernier on a recueilli de la céramique commune et glaçurée, des fragments de vases en verre, des clous en fer et une monnaie byzantine en bronze datée entre le VIIe et le VIIIe s.

Lire la suite
À Liménas de Thasos, K. Panousi et D. Malamidou (XVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) ont mené entre 2007 et 2008 une fouille de sauvetage sur le terrain Orphanou, mettant au jour les vestiges de deux édifices, vraisemblablement d’habitation, ainsi que deux puits. Il s’agit de bâtiments rectangulaires, chacun divisé en deux rangées de trois pièces. S’ils paraissent chronologiquement proches, celui situé plus au Nord est légèrement plus tardif ; il a été construit en moellons avec quelques spolia en marbre, tandis que sa pièce Nord-Est comportait un sol en mortier rouge clair. On y a recueilli de la céramique utilitaire datée du IVe au VIIe s. apr. J.-C., des clous en fer, des fragments de vases en verre et des monnaies, dont une a été datée de la première moitié du IVe s. de notre ère.

Lire la suite
À Limenas de Thasos, K. Panousi et D. Malamidou (XVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) ont mené, en 2008, une fouille de sauvetage sur le terrain Sakalidi (no 11, OT 93), mettant au jour une partie de nécropole (fig. 1). On a découvert quatre tombes à ciste, à parois en dalles de pierre ou en moellons, deux tombes à tuiles, ainsi que deux autres sépultures probables. Pour la plupart pillées, les inhumations étaient prises dans des niveaux comportant de grandes quantités de céramique (notamment des assiettes à vernis noir et à décor imprimé du IVe s. av. J.-C.), évoquant un dépotoir de nécropole ou d’atelier céramique, avec des ossements humains et d’animaux. La fouille a également livré 35 monnaies, quelques figurines et poids de tissage, ainsi que de nombreux clous en fer.

Lire la suite
Près de la commune de Pigadia, D. Makropoulou et R. Gougousaki (15e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) ont mené en 2007 et 2008 une fouille de sauvetage au lieu-dit Valta – Soouk Sou et ont mis au jour des vestiges d’une basilique protobyzantine, ainsi qu’une partie de son cimetière. L'église découverte est une une basilique  à trois nefs (long. 18,50 m ; larg. 13,60 m), séparées par des murs, chacun à trois ouvertures de portes qui ont été condamnées ultérieurement ; elle est également dotée d’une abside à l’Est et d’un narthex à l’Ouest (fig. 1-2). Sa construction est située au VIe s. apr. J.-C. mais elle était vraisemblablement encore en utilisation au XIIe s. La fouille a livré de la céramique abondante, dont un encensoir, des fragments de plaques de chancel ainsi qu’une base de colonne en marbre, des fragments de vitres et de lampes à huile en verre, des objets en fer, des monnaies en bronze datées du IVe et du Xe-XIe s. de notre ère. Vers le Nord, sur le terrain Pantélou, on a découvert, outre un tronçon de mur en mortier d’argile, quatre sépultures d’époque protobyzantine recouvertes de dalles de pierre. L’une a livré des fragments de céramique commune et une lampe à huile protobyzantine.

Lire la suite
Sur la place centrale de la commune d’Abdère, R. Gougousaki et D. Makropoulou (15e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) ont mené en 2008 une fouille de sauvetage  qui a révélé une partie de cimetière protobyzantin. On a trouvé trois tombes recouvertes de dalles de pierre. Au moins une, vraisemblablement féminine, était à ciste et contenait des tessons de céramique commune. En surface, on a également recueilli un fragment de vase glaçuré du XVIe-XVIIe s. de notre ère.

Lire la suite
AVERTISSEMENT
La Chronique des fouilles en ligne ne constitue en aucun cas une publication des découvertes qui y sont signalées.
L'EfA et la BSA ne peuvent délivrer de copie des illustrations qui y sont reproduites et dont ils ne détiennent pas les droits.