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Dernières notices ajoutées par région : Attique
Athens Acropolis. M. Ioannidou (Director, Acropolis Restoration Service) reports on the work of the Service in 2007 and 2008  Parthenon: structural restoration of the dismantled members of the N colonnade continued, with 8 columns reset in place, and work begun on resetting the entablature at the level of the architrave. At the Wend of the N colonnade the dismantling of the metopes was initiated. Propylaia: restoration work on the ceilings of the W hall has been completed with the resetting of restored architectural members of the superstructure. Restoration of the E portico has reached the level of the frieze. Temple of Athena Nike: resetting of restored blocks of the architrave and column bases continued, alongside structural restoration of the intervening layers. A conservation and excavation project has been undertaken on the back wall of the Stoa of Eumenes II on the S slope of the Acropolis. This N wall appears to have been constructed in the 4th Ct BC as part of an athletics facility, and also supported the peripatos above. Many graffiti were discovered on the faces of the blocks, indicating that the structure was part of the first Panathenaic Stadium of the Athenians.

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Athens, Ano Petralona, Trion Ierarchon 159 (O.T. 59024, property of S. Loumakou). Maria Kontopanagou (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a ceramic workshop (Fig. 1). Specifically, two walls and three kilns were found. This area had many workshops in the 4th c. B.C. (see references below). Burned clay, ashes, fragments from an eschara, pottery sherds and numerous intact pots were found in the kilns. The pots include lamps, phialai, plates, kantharoi, lekythoi and 12 kernoi (Fig. 2).

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Anc. Agora. J.M. Camp (ASCSA) reports on the 2008 excavation season. In section BH, excavations continued below the MByz walls in, over and behind the Painted Stoa. Both the back wall and the interior colonnade of the stoa were found well preserved at its E end. Largely in limestone, the workmanship of the superstructure is of the highest quality. The back wall has limestone foundations which project 0.24m beyond the inner face of the toichobate. Above, 3 toichobate blocks and part of a 4th remain in situ, 1.205m l., 0.935m w., 0.26m h. The tops are finished with a claw chisel and there are 2 pry-holes preserved. Resting on the toichobate are 2 blocks of the outer run of orthostates in situ, 1.205m l., 0.325m w., 0.915m h., which were originally joined with a double-T clamp, now missing. The tops are finished with a claw chisel; the backs are well dressed with a drove and there is a rebate along the bottom, 0.09m h. and 0.01m d.; each block also has a lifting boss preserved. Behind the back wall was found a fragment of a large terracotta pipe associated with the pipeline found in situ running behind the building further W, usually associated with the Kimonian aqueduct bringing water out to the Academy. The fragment was found in MByz fill, suggesting that at the E end of the building the aqueduct had been disturbed. Behind the stoa, generally the fill explored was rubble of the MByz and LRom periods, and so remains have not yet been reached that are contemporary with the stoa. Within the line of the back wall inside the building is a second heavy foundation of soft limestone (Fig. 1) running 0.30-0.35m from the inner face of the foundations of the back wall and measuring 1.04m w. This same run of limestone was found in a similar situation at the W. Possibilities include support for an inner bench or installation; a pre-Persian version of the Stoa Peisianax, attested in a scholion to Aelius Aristeides (in which case the better-preserved remains above would represent a post-Persian rebuilding); or a remnant of the Ar city wall of Athens, no trace of which has yet been identified. Within the building were exposed parts of the 2 E interior Ionic columns. The W of the 2 survives only in its foundations, 2 limestone blocks set side-by-side. The E is better preserved, consisting of a square limestone base, ca. 0.88m on a side, supporting a large cylinder of marble 0.18m h. and 0.79m di. (Fig. 2). On top of this is the unfluted limestone shaft of the column itself, 0.59m di., preserved to a h. of 0.5m. The closest parallel is the L5th Ct Pompeion at the Kerameikos. A rubble wall running SW from the easternmost column, 0.6m d. and preserved to 0.6m h., rests at about the level of the original stoa floor  and may represent a later blocking of the interior colonnade. The BY excavation, in a new section created by the demolition of 2 buildings along Ag. Philippos Street, revealed late fill down to 0.75m below the demolition surface. At the E were reached the tops of rubble walls of the Byz period; to the W, the foundations of the mod. building are more extensive. Several large worked blocks in limestone and marble with anathyrosis and double-T clamps suggest they come from more than one substantial Cl building. The lower part of a marble relief of the Mother of the Gods seated on a throne was found built into a Byz wall. The head of a terracotta horse (Fig. 3) matches others found in this area, reminding us that this NW corner of the Agora was a centre for the Athenian cavalry in Cl and Hel times. In section G, excavation took place in an area of a cluster of small buildings of the Cl period, immediately S of the Tholos, which were put out of use in the Hel period by the shifting of the course of a road. To the E of these buildings is the shop of Simon the cobbler, to the W the ‘Strategeion’. The aim of the excavation was to determine whether these buildings - small, crowded and irregular in their plans - were public or private and, if private, whether they had a commercial function. The discovery of a tile-lined well should confirm the interpretation of the area as an open courtyard. A bg lamp from the well suggests that it went out of use close to the 2nd quarter of the 4th Ct. Elsewhere in the area, various floor levels and pits were dug, mostly dating to the 4th Ct. Two fractional silver coins (Fig. 4) were found, plus a large fragment of an amphora with a graffito (Fig. 5). In many instances the fill contained numerous sherds of the 8th and 7th Cts BC, perhaps indicative of earlier houses or disturbed burials.

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Thorikos. In 2008 a topographical survey of the industrial quarter and the theatre area was undertaken by R. Docter (Belgian School/Ghent)  in order to produce a digital base map of all excavated architectural remains of the urban settlement. Documentation of all visible remains brought to light a hitherto unknown cistern in the industrial quarter.

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Marathon, Tsepi. M. Pantelidou-Gofas (ASA) reports on continued excavation of the EH cemetery. The façade of tomb 53 was carefully constructed of stones from the nearby Scorpios river and is significantly smaller than the other tombs (1.3m x 1.4m, instead of the more usual 1.5m x 2.5m). The apsidal pit of the tomb (0.94m x 0.8m, 0.81m d.) is lined with slate and the floors paved with small stones. The entrance on the E has 2 steps carved into the ground. The grave was full of bones, including 14 skulls scattered without order. The skeleton of the last burial to the E side was found lying above a mass of bones. The form of the tomb is not that of the original; the burial pit was lined and covered with slabs, but later converted by the construction of steps, an entrance and threshold in keeping with burial habits of the period. In its final form, the tomb was a rectangular structure surrounded by a peribolos of  small stones. Tomb 54 lies beside a stone mound and lacks a peribolos. Irregular slabs covered the tomb at the level of the anc. surface and it was surrounded on 3 sides by river stones. The entrance area was full of large closely packed upright cobbles. Two stelai were placed at the sides of the tomb, cut off above ground level. The entrance slab was found in situ. The entrance has a stone threshold; a large arch-shaped stone was used as a lintel above. The tomb was full of bones, including 7 skulls. Bones of the last skeleton were found right beside the entrance, together with small stones and fragments from large vessels, which were not found elsewhere in the tomb. The skull had been broken and the jaw was found separated from it; a large pebble had been placed in the mouth, as had previously been discovered in tombs 42, 45 and 68. It appears that the tomb was deliberately put out of use, judging from the absence of a peribolos, the stones of which had been thrown in to fill the entrance and thus impede the tomb’s further use.

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Skala Oropou. A. Mazarakis Ainian (ASA) reports on continued excavation. In 2008, the remaining section of building ΛΒ was excavated and proved to be elliptical (4.3m x 7.3m) with an entrance at the S side and walls 0.5m d. (Fig. 1). To the E of the stone hearth found in 2007 a pit full of ashes was revealed. From these two hearths ash had spread all over the floor of the building. Sherds of the 2nd half of the 8th Ct were found, with loomweights and a serpentine seal depicting a bird. N of the building, two 12m l. stretches of peribolos walls, one contemporaneous with the elliptical building, the other later, perhaps defined the S section of an anc. road. A few meters away to the NW two other elliptical structures, ΛΔ and ΛΕ, came to light built one on top of the other, along with remains of other buildings and periboloi. Building ΛΔ, 8.6m l. and 5.4m w., built partially on top of the older ΛΕ, belongs to a transitional period from the Geo to the EAr and was in use until the 6th Ct. The interior was paved with large stones and contained much ash and carbonized fruit. In the S part of the building a hearth was found built with fragments of large pots within a circle of small stones. The door, on the S side, had a threshold of large stones. The NE quarter of the interior is separated from the rest by a wall. Inside the building and along the wall were found clay loomweights, beads, stone weights, metal objects, mainly iron, and EAr sherds. Outside building ΛΒ to the SE was found a pit filled with ash, which may be the remains of a posthole to be associate with another parallel to the building’s W wall, which may have supported a roof to protect the building from rain, or may belong to a 3rd elliptical structure. Of the older building ΛΕ (9m l., 5.5m w.) only a small section was investigated. Pottery from the structure dates to the end of the 8th Ct., while outside the building part of the neck of a LGeo Attic amphora was discovered. The peribolos, outside and W of buildings ΛΔ and ΛΕ, was 1m thick, remarkable for the site. E of the 2 elliptical buildings, 3 other walls (2 Geo, 1 Ar) were exposed.

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Salamis Kanakia. Y. Lolos (Ioannina) reports on the 2008 season of excavation which focused on the Myc élite residence on the acropolis and the neighbouring Myc cemetery. On the acropolis, building Γ, the central residence (of which 45 rooms and spaces have so far been revealed, covering an area of at least 750m2), was further investigated. Excavation of one room of the N wing was completed: this was attached to the so called ‘One-roomed House’ (A2). N of the N entrance to the building, a reception or waiting area was revealed. This was probably roofed from the beginning, and was set at a lower level than the rooms to the S of it: the main approach was through a wide entrance way on the W side with a built threshold. On the W side of this area, stone steps (oriented N-S, 2.75m w.) led down into the interior of the building. A stone bench (2.5m l., 0.55m average d. and 0.4m h.), along the S wall, could seat 6 people. An undecorated terracotta bath-tub (1.5m l., 0.6m w. at centre and 0.5m h.) was set into the floor almost touching the N wall. The area produced a large quantity of LHIIIB-LHIIIC E pottery, 2 tripod chytres, 50 stone tools and small objects, and fragments of a terracotta figurine. In the cemetery, an oval tumulus (20m x 25m, over 2m h.) was discovered, set on bedrock within a stone kerb on the WSW side, and with a peribolos wall of large, unworked stones set around and at some distance from it. The tumulus did not contain burials. It was likely marked by a stele, given the discovery of an approximately rectangular, roughly worked, thick stone slab, now set aside on its E side. A few Myc sherds were included in the tumulus fill; a clear Myc stratum discerned a few metres from the W side provides good relative dating evidence for the construction. Two large openings cut into the bedrock in antiquity, both empty of finds, are open to various interpretations (as remains of tomb robbing, unfinished graves, looted cenotaphs or bothroi for cult offerings). A LCl-Hel temenos is located close by. The likely ritual function of the tumulus is reinforced by the presence a few metres from its W side of a paved, approximately round exedra. LMyc pottery was found on its surface, along with 2 fragments of terracotta figurines and a few animal bones. The pottery shapes are mostly open (kylikes, skyphoi and chytres) and are similar to those in use in the last phase of activity in the residence. Finally, surface survey was undertaken of a limited part of the area surrounding Kanakia. An anc. (possibly Hel) round well (di. 1.2-1.3m), cut into the limestone bedrock, was recorded on the site of the mod. coastal well, directly below the W side of the Myc acropolis. The quarry for the grey limestone used for the Myc residence was located close to the acropolis towards the SE (towards Pyrgiakoni), where today quarries are in use as refuse dumps. Other focuses of survey were the N boundary of the Myc cemetery; documentation of a later (Hel) peribolos on the SE side of the acropolis, ca. 50m l. and generally oriented E-W; and documentation and evaluation of features inside the LCl-Hel temenos noted above.

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Mavrovouni. G. Kakava and S. Zyrba report on rescue excavation of LCh and EByz remains on the Sousti property, 200m from the Gulf of Aianteio and 350m from the village of that name. Three tombs were excavated. Tomb I is a vaulted cist, built of rubble masonry with lime plaster, which contained 2 successive burial deposits. The upper, which contained the scattered bones of 6 adults, was almost entirely without goods, and probably represents secondary reburial. The lower contained 2 disintegrating adult skeletons, with 7 plainware vessels, a bronze pin and a bronze probe. Bronze and iron nails indicate that the deceased had been buried on a wooden bier. The tomb dates between the 5th and 6th Ct AD. Tomb II lies SW of tomb I, and is a wide, rectangular cist of roughly worked irregular masonry (0.4-0.5m thick) with lime plaster, preserved to a maximum h. of 0.65m, and with a rounded vault. It was entered from the E; the steps down into the tomb, preserved in situ, are made of bricks with wavy-line finger impressions. Many burials were made in 2 episodes. In the upper, the skeletal material was scattered, with the remains of at least 8 crania in the NW part of the chamber, with many fewer bones, chiefly from the lower limbs, over the remaining area. There were almost no grave goods - merely parts of a pair of bronze earrings, a silver earring, 2 small iron nails and a vase at the E side of the tomb. The presence of this jewellery is taken by the excavators to imply that at least 2 of the deceased were women. In the lower level, 3 skeletons were uncovered close to the S long wall of the tomb, in extended, supine position, directly on the ground. Three adult crania and one of a small child were found at the NW corner, while a quantity of lower limb bones was found along the N side. Despite the poor condition of the skeletal material, 7 burials could be recognized, accompanied by rich goods. A vessel was found broken at the entrance of the tomb: personal ornament included a silver and a bronze pin, 4 bronze buckles (including one of the de Bolgota type), a pair of bronze earrings, a bronze ring and a small bronze bell, as well as one silver and 2 bronze probes. In this level also were iron nails of various sizes and 2 iron rings. The goods assist in identifying the gender and age of the deceased: 6 were adults and one a child (to whom the bell belonged), and at least 3 of the adults were men, perhaps of military or other official rank to judge from the form of the buckles. The large quantity of lime in the upper level supports the view that the victims of some epidemic were buried together in an existing and spacious grave. The tomb generally dates to the 6th and 7th Cts AD. Tomb III, which is partially destroyed, lies SE of tomb II and parallel to tomb I. It is a built family tomb, of the same dimensions, construction and orientation as tomb 1. It was probably a chamber tomb, but there is insufficient evidence for the form of the roof. It contained 5 contemporary burials. Three skeletons were found along the S long side; traces of a 4th cranium, with part of a bronze earring above it, were observed in the NW corner. This skeleton must have been laid along the N wall and was mostly destroyed when the tomb was damaged. A 5th, smaller and more delicate cranium was found at roughly the level of the waist of the 2nd skeleton; it appears to belong to a small child buried beside its mother. The grave goods were mostly found buried beneath the collapsed tomb walls on the N, W and S sides, with personal items inside or around the crania. Sherds from 7 plainware vessels were collected, along with bronze and silver jewellery (one silver and 4 bronze earrings, one bronze and 2 silver pins, part of a bronze necklace, a silver coin used as a pendant, 2 bronze probes, a small bronze bell and many small iron rings probably from a belt). Inside cranium 2 was a bronze 20 nummus coin of the reign of  the Emperor Phokas (602-610) from the mint of Constantinople, which gives a secure tpq of the E7th Ct AD for the tomb itself. Tombs I and III were at the same d., and set parallel to each other, 0.3m apart. They are simple constructions of approximately the same dimensions. Tomb II, however, is larger and belongs to a particular category of vaulted tomb with steps down from the entrance which appears in the 6th Ct. It is a more elaborate and costly structure, and this, together with the notable grave goods, indicates that those buried there were members of a prominent local family. E of tomb III, a wall may be part of a destroyed 4th tomb, since there is a large quantity of brick and tile (much of which has similar finger impressions), lime plaster, sherds of combed ware and bone. In the surrounding area part of a curved stone wall was excavated, plus sections of road of different periods. Finally, an extensive pyre was revealed, with portable finds which seem to date it earlier than the ECh period. The discovery of at least 3 family tombs at this site reinforces the hypothesis that there was a permanent settlement somewhere in the wider area in ECh times. It complements the discovery of a 6th Ct vaulted tomb at Pyrgiakoni, an E7th Ct vaulted tomb at Perani and ECh tombs at Ag. Dimitrios and Ag. Athanasios, near Aianteio.

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Kythera Island Project. C. Broodbank (BSA/London) and E. Kiriatzi (BSA) report on the 2008 study season. Study of the Rom pottery was a principal objective: the Rom component at Kastri and at 26 further sites was examined and the absence of Rom material at many more sites verified (Fig. 1). Sites selected included large coastal establishments (for example, site 129) and inland sites that range substantially in size (for example, sites 020 and 108). Overall, LRom is most common (17 sites with substantial quantities of sherds plus 6 with tiny amounts), but a substantial amount of MRom is also notable: distinct ERom phenomena are small, coastal sites rich in finewares and a major Hel and/or ERom presence at Diakofti, the alternative harbour to Kastri, at a period when activity at Kastri is reduced. There are strong indications of distinctions between assemblages at different kinds of sites, and much evidence for shifting patterns of off-island contacts and activity well into the L7th Ct AD. One further Cl site (082) emerged. A large amount of MByz to E/MVen pottery (ca. 12th-16th Ct AD) was studied: a particularly fruitful comparison was made between 2 large inland sites, the slightly earlier site 108 and site 174, the late phase at which overlaps with the 18th Ct AD start of regular census records. Two hundred samples of MByz to E/MVen wares were selected for petrographic and chemical analysis, the largest-scale sampling of such material yet undertaken in the Aegean. Analysis of the Cl-Rom metallurgical debris collected by the survey (primarily ca. 45kg of slag, mostly from 23 sites) continues (M. Georgakopoulou). The widespread occurrence of small-scale Cl-Rom debris contrasts strikingly with the extremely restricted distribution of PH copper metallurgy, though it remains far from ubiquitous. Specific instances of Cl and Rom metallurgy can be identified, and in the case of multiperiod sites, internal spatial resolution is sometimes sufficient to indicate an earlier or later date for such activity. All slags have been examined macroscopically, revealing a distinction between a group with a flow texture on their upper surface, sometimes with iron ore fragments, commonly associated with a N Kytheran or S Laconian smelting origin (bloomery smelting has been inferred from Cl fragments in the Kastri excavation material) and another group comprising residues from small smithing hearths. On pure Cl sites, the 2 types do not coincide, perhaps suggesting specialized production areas. These preliminary observations are currently being tested through analytical examination (chemical and microstructural) of a large sample selected to cover both slag-type and inter-site variation.

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Kythera Sklere. T. Gregory (Ohio) reports on a survey of the fortified site at Sklere, identified with the fortress of Ag. Dimitrios, conducted as part of the Australian Palaiochora-Kythera Archaeological Project of the Australian Institute in Athens. Sklere is a ridge running NW-SE immediately W of Aroniadika, which dominates the plain between Aroniadika and Potamos. There is a significant concentration of 16th Ct pottery on the central part of the ridge and in the immediate vicinity of the church of Ag. Dimitrios, as well as well-preserved walls and large stone piles E of the church and just below (W of) the high point of the ridge. The stone piles stand out for their size and for the fact that they retain the distinct shapes of collapsed features. Thus two large stone features on the N, each over 1m h. (that on the W being 15m l. and ca. 5m w.), have clearly defined E-W walls ca. 1.5m w. The walls are broken by a probable passageway ca. 2.5m w. mid-way between the stone piles. Another similar stone pile is located on the SW, ca. 12m x 5m and up to 1.5m h., with a depression in the top. To the E of this is an elongated feature running SW-NE, with a distinct circular depression in the E side: this feature reaches the high point of the ridge and meets the stone feature on the E end of the N part of the site. Taken together, it is possible to see these stone features as towers and strong points joined into a rudimentary defensive circuit, ca. 40m2. This cannot have been a true castle, as the high point of the ridge is left outside anything that can be considered part of the fortifications. Furthermore, all the construction is in drystone technique, which is not appropriate for any significant Ven fortification. It may rather be a local attempt to provide a place of concealment and safety from Ot raids after the sack of Palaiochora in 1537 (noting the local petition to Venice for assistance in 1543).

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Saronic Harbors Archaeological Research Project (SHARP). D. Pullen (ASCSA/Florida) and T. Tartaron (ASCSA/Pennsylvania) report on a 2nd season of fieldwork. In 2008, as in 2007, research focused on the Myc settlement at Korphos-Kalamianos and on the surrounding territory (Fig. 1). Kalamianos was a major harbour settlement of the Myc palatial period, with a large urban centre that was a focus of Myc activity extending well beyond the site itself. Work continued on the mapping of architectural features. Survey and drawing of structures continued at Kalamianos: sectors 5 and 9 were targeted, in addition to the fortification wall. While over much of the site buildings are set some distance apart, sector 5 has produced the densest concentration of architecture (Fig. 2). Two streets or alleys allow access between structures. One of these, structure 5-1223, seems to be a major organizational feature of sector 5, and can be traced for nearly 60m N-S in 3 segments which are continuous although not perfectly aligned. E of the N part of this street lies building 5-II, a very large structure with numerous rooms, a clear entrance on the W and several inbuilt features (perhaps bins or platforms). To the W lies building 5-VIII, a structure with 6 parallel units oriented N-S, each of which has 3 to 4 rooms running N-S. The structure is thus an insula like those seen elsewhere in the Aegean. One of the units, B2-B3, was apparently rebuilt at a slightly higher level and with somewhat larger stones. Sector 9 has produced some of the clearest evidence for post-Myc reuse at Kalamianos. Building 9-IV (Fig. 3), a large Myc structure of canonical masonry, contains a possible kiln, the stone packing of which is associated with finger impressed Rom tiles and spiral grooved ware. Elsewhere in the vicinity, LRom 1 and 2 amphora rims were found. Kalamianos had a fortification circuit that enclosed all of the architecture (ca. 4ha), as well as large areas of open land (ca. 3ha). Two probable gates have been identified. A long wall (Fig. 3) runs from the E shore to the W, cutting off the Kalamianos peninsula. Near the middle of the N wall, 2 parallel walls, 7-XXIV and 7-XIX, funnel access past a well-constructed tower (7-XV) to the narrow entrance to the site. To the SE, another possible gate complex, 9-V, controlled access between the lower, built-up portion of the site and the higher, unoccupied but fortified, hilltop. To the Wand SW, the wall is identified only in small sections. Any wall along the S edge of the site would probably lie below the mod. sea level. Intensive archaeological survey of the Kalamianos site was completed. Finds collected from individual rooms, within walls and between buildings allowed the buildings to be dated with varying degrees of precision. Preliminary analysis suggests that the material is almost entirely LHIIIB in date, with very little earlier or later Myc. Almost half of the site was covered, although a significant percentage of the survey area could not be walked due to steep slopes or dense vegetation. Beyond Kalamianos, the survey identified FNeo, EBA, LBA, Cl/Hel and Emod. sites. There is widespread evidence for small Myc enclosures, some of which may have had associated towers. In all instances these enclosures have clear views over the surrounding territory and control natural passages into the region. E of Korphos bay, between the mod. village and Kalamianos, a series of stone cairns previously interpreted as Hel boundary markers was re-examined. Based on their form and the ceramics contained in them, they probably represent theremains of another EBA fortified site, as nearby Vayia and Vassa, although they may have been reused in later periods. On a low ridge between 2 hilltops at Akrotirio Stiri, high above Kalamianos, a 2nd large Myc settlement was discovered, overlooking a steep cliff and with an expansive view of the Saronic Gulf to the E. This settlement is smaller than that at Kalamianos (the main part of the complex is ca. 200m x 70m), but the architecture and chronology are similar (Fig. 4). From the small hill S of the site, Kalamianos and the Saronic Gulf stretching out to the S are in plain view, while from the cliff delimiting the settlement to the E, there is a much broader view of the Saronic coasts, including Attica and Salamis. Thus, the community at Stiri could monitor maritime traffic on the Saronic Gulf, as well as the land passes above Kalamianos. Geological and geomorphological research (R. Dunn: Norwich, Vermont) focused on problems of erosion and sedimentation, hydrology and coastline change over time, and especially on karstic features and the hydrology of the region. The lines of the bedrock joints were mapped across the site. These joints often split into so-called fissures which occur in association with architecture; as they seem to be sources of fresh water, their distribution may be a factor in the location of buildings. Coring was undertaken on the Kalamianos site and in the region. One core, within building 7-I, had a few particles of partially burnt clay (perhaps burnt mud-brick or daub), indicating the presence of cultural deposits.

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Αntikythera. Anc. Aigilia.  A.Tsaravopoulos (ΚΣτ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports excavation and cleaning of the Hel fortifications.

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Acropolis. M. Ioannidou (Director, Acropolis Restoration Service) reports on the work of the Service in 2007 and 2008. Parthenon: structural restoration of the dismantled members of the north colonnade continued, with 8 columns reset in  place, and work begun on resetting the entablature at the level of the architrave. At the west end of the north colonnade the dismantling of the metopes was initiated. Propylaia: restoration work on the ceilings of the west hall has been completed with the resetting of restored architectural members of the superstructure. Restoration of the east portico has reached the level of the frieze. Temple of Athena Nike: resetting of restored blocks of the architrave and column bases continued, alongside structural restoration of the intervening layers. Eleftherotypia and To Vima (15/01/09) report the findings of a conservation and excavation project at the back wall of the Stoa of Eumenes II on the south slope of the Acropolis. This north wall appears to have been constructed in the 4th Ct BC as part of an athletics facility, and also supported the peripatos above. Many graffiti were discovered on the faces of the blocks, indicating that the structure was part of the first Panathenaic Stadium of the Athenians.

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Ancient Agora. J.M. Camp (ASCSA) reports on the 2008 excavation season. In section BH, excavations continued  below the MByz walls in, over and behind the Painted Stoa. Both the back wall and the interior colonnade of the stoa were found well preserved at its East end. Largely in limestone, the workmanship of the superstructure is of the highest quality. The back wall has limestone foundations which project 0.24m beyond the inner face of the toichobate. Above, 3 toichobate blocks and part of a 4th remain in situ, 1.205m l., 0.935m w., 0.26m h. The tops are finished with a claw chisel and there are 2 pry-holes preserved. Resting on the toichobate are 2 blocks of the outer run of orthostates in situ, 1.205m l., 0.325m w., 0.915m h., which were originally joined with a double-T clamp, now missing. The tops are finished with a claw chisel; the backs are well dressed with a drove and there is a rebate along the bottom, 0.09m h. and 0.01m d.; each block also has a lifting boss preserved. Behind the back wall was found a fragment of a large terracotta pipe associated with the pipeline found in situ running behind the building further west, usually associated with the Kimonian aqueduct bringing water out to the Academy. The fragment was found in MByz fill, suggesting that at the East end of the building the aqueduct had been disturbed. Behind the stoa, generally the fill explored was rubble of the MByz and LRom periods, and so remains have not yet been reached that are  contemporary with the stoa. Within the line of the back wall inside the building is a second heavy foundation of soft limestone running 0.30−0.35m from the inner face of the foundations of the back wall and measuring 1.04m w. This same run of limestone was found in a similar situation at the west. Possibilities include support for an inner bench or installation; a pre-Persian version of the Stoa Peisianax, attested in a scholion to Aelius Aristeides (in which case the better-preserved remains above would represent a post-Persian rebuilding); or a remnant of the Archaic city wall of Athens, no trace of which has yet been  identified. Within the building were exposed parts of the 2 eastern interior Ionic columns. The western of the 2 survives only in its foundations, 2 limestone blocks set side-by-side. The eastern is better preserved, consisting of a square limestone base, ca. 0.88m on a side, supporting a large cylinder of marble 0.18m h. and 0.79m di. On top of this is the unfluted  limestone shaft of the column itself, 0.59m di., preserved to a h. of 0.5m. The closest parallel is the late 5th-century Pompeion at the Kerameikos. A rubble wall running southwest from the easternmost column, 0.6m d. and preserved to 0.6m h., rests at about the level of the original stoa floor and may represent a later blocking of the interior colonnade. The ΒΘ excavation, in a new section created by the demolition of 2 buildings along Ag. Philippos Street, revealed late fill down to 0.75m below the demolition surface. At the east were reached the tops of rubble walls of the Byz period; to the west, the foundations of the modern building are more extensive. Several large worked blocks in limestone and marble with anathyrosis and double-T clamps suggest they come from more than one substantial Classical building. The lower part of a marble relief of the Mother of the Gods seated on a throne was found built into a Byzantine wall. The head of a terracotta horse matches others found in this area, reminding us that this northwest corner of the Agora was a centre for the Athenian cavalry in Classical and Hellenistic times. In section Γ, excavation took place in an area of a cluster of small buildings of the Classical period, immediately south of the Tholos, which were put out of use in the Hellenistic period by the shifting of the course of a road. To the east of these buildings is the shop of Simon the cobbler, to the west the ‘Strategeion’. The aim of the excavation was to determine whether these buildings − small, crowded and irregular in their plans − were public or private and, if private, whether they had a commercial function. The discovery of a tile-lined well should confirm the interpretation of the area as an open  courtyard. A black-glazed lamp from the well suggests that it went out of use close to the 2nd quarter of the 4th century. Elsewhere in the area, various floor levels and pits were dug, mostly dating to the 4th century. Two fractional silver coins were found, plus a large fragment of an amphora with a graffito. In many instances the fill contained numerous sherds of the 8th and 7th centuries BC, perhaps indicative of earlier houses or disturbed burials.

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Kaisariani. A tomb was discovery by the Β' ΕΠΚΑ, during construction of a natural gas line on Ethnikis Antistaseos Street, dating to the 4th−3rd centuries, containing a skeleton, well-preserved from the waist down, and a fragment of a copper mirror.

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Vouliagmeni, Cape Zoster. εxcavations were conducted by the  ΚΣτ' ΕΠΚΑ in the grounds of the Asteras Hotel. Structures of the 3rd millennium were discovered; finds included phallic figurines, a tiny axe of green stone, multiple stone tools,  obsidian blades and abundant ceramics.

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Cholargos. Excavations associated with the construction of the metro have brought to light a stretch of a 5th-century BC road with drainage pipes 0.4m di. A roadside cemetery, also of the 5th century, contained the larnax burial of an infant, with grave goods including a black-glazed cup.

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Nea Erythraia. An excavation by the Β' ΕΠΚΑ of a 0.2ha plot at the junction of Ethnikis Antistaseos and Lemnou Streets uncovered a Neolithic settlement dating to 3,500 BC alongside an ancient tributary of the Kifissos river. Postholes of huts were found, with successive floors of packed earth and gravel, which included stone tools, obsidian blades and small shallow storage pits containing pots.

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Marathon, Tsepi. M. Pantelidou-Gofas reports on continued excavation of the EH cemetery. The façade of tomb 53 was carefully constructed of stones from the nearby Scorpios river and is significantly smaller than the other tombs (1.3m x 1.4m, instead of the more usual 1.5m x 2.5m). The apsidal pit of the tomb (0.94m x 0.8m, 0.81m d.) is lined with slate and the floors paved with small stones. The entrance on the E has 2 steps carved into the ground. The  grave was full of bones, including 14 skulls scattered without order. The skeleton of the last burial to the East side was found lying above a mass of bones. The form of the tomb is not that of the original; the burial pit was lined and covered with slabs, but later converted by the construction of steps, an entrance and threshold in keeping with burial habits of the period. In its final form, the tomb was a rectangular structure surrounded by a peribolos of small stones. Tomb 54 lies beside a stone mound and lacks a peribolos. Irregular slabs covered the tomb at the level of the ancient surface and it was surrounded on 3 sides by river stones. The entrance area was full of large closely packed upright cobbles. Two stelai were placed at the sides of the tomb, cut off above ground level. The entrance slab was found in situ. The entrance has a stone threshold; a large arch-shaped stone was used as a lintel above. The tomb was full of bones, including 7 skulls. Bones of the last skeleton were found right beside the entrance, together with small stones and   fragments from large vessels, which were not found elsewhere in the tomb. The skull had been broken and the jaw was found separated from it; a large pebble had been placed in the mouth, as had previously been discovered in tombs 42, 45 and 68. It appears that the tomb was deliberately put out of use, judging from the absence of a peribolos, the stones of which had been thrown in to fill the entrance and thus impede the tomb’s further use.

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Skala Oropou. A. Mazarakis Ainian reports on continued excavation. In 2008, the remaining section of building ΛΒ was excavated and proved to be elliptical (4.3m x 7.3m) with an entrance at the south side and walls 0.5m d. (Fig. 6). To the east of the stone hearth found in 2007 a pit full of ashes was revealed. From these two hearths ash had spread all over the floor of the building. Sherds of the 2nd half of the 8th century were found, with loomweights and a serpentine seal depicting a bird. North of the building, two 12m long stretches of peribolos walls, one  contemporaneous with the elliptical building, the other later, perhaps defined the southern section of an ancient road. A few meters away to the northwest two other elliptical structures, ΛΔ and ΛΕ, came to light built one on top of the  other, along with remains of other buildings and periboloi. Building ΛΔ, 8.6m long, and 5.4m wide, built partially on top of the older ΛΕ, belongs to a transitional period from the Geometric to the Early Archaic and was in use until the 6th century. The interior was paved with large stones and contained much ash and carbonized fruit. In the south part of the building a hearth was found built with fragments of large pots within a circle of small stones. The door, on the South side, had a threshold of large stones. The northeast quarter of the interior is separated from the rest by a wall. Inside the building and along the wall were found clay loomweights, beads, stone weights, metal objects, mainly iron, and Early Archaic sherds. Outside building ΛΒ to the southeast was found a pit filled with ash, which may be the  remains of a posthole to be associated with another parallel to the building’s west wall, which may have supported a roof to protect the building from rain, or may belong to a 3rd elliptical structure. Of the older building ΛΕ (9m l., 5.5m w.) only a small section was investigated. Pottery from the  structure dates to the end of the 8th century, while outside the building part of the neck of a Late Geometric Attic amphora was discovered. The peribolos, outside and west of buildings ΛΔ and ΛΕ, was 1m thick, remarkable for the site. East of the 2 elliptical buildings, 3 other walls (2 Geometric, 1 Archaic) were exposed.

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Kastro Choras, Church of the Pantokrator. M. Papadimitriou (1st EBA) reports that investigation of the church floor led to the discovery of tombs with and other finds of the 15th-16th centuries.    

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D. Sourlas reports on excavations from 2008 onwards which have sought to clarify aspects of the topography of the Library of Hadrian and the Roman Agora within the site of modern Athens’ first hotel, the Aiolos, built in the 1830s at Adrianou 64 and Aiolou 3-5, on a substantial plot (458.5m2). Trial trenches in the southern basements failed to expose the northeast corner of the Roman Agora, probably located only a few metres further west; but a substantial part of the southeast corner of the Library was found in an excellent state of preservation. A large section (ca. 12m) of the south peribolos wall was revealed to four courses, as well as 3 courses of the east wall (6.5m long). A section of the Late Roman city wall was identified in contact with the east peribolos of Library, mostly its core with much spolia).  Many important honorific statue bases were discovered built into a gate of the eastern arm of the Late Roman walls. The inscriptions honour Athenians and foreigners, and all but one date to the 3rd century AD, the exception honouring the Emperor Nero as the new Apollo. Of particular interest is an base of 18 lines for Lucius Egnatius Victor Lollianus, a prominent official of the Roman Empire of the early 3rd century, consul suffectus, governor of Bythinia and Pontus, three times proconsul of Asia, and finally in 254 praefectus urbanus of Rome. The position of a gate here had been predicted, and it is connected with an ancient road leading to the Hadrianic Pantheon or Panellinion, parts of which had been revealed in excavations in 1968 at Adrianou 78. Following the course of the Late Roman walls to the east, new works at Adrianou 80 and Diogenous 3 in 2007 revealed the east side of a fortification tower connected with the Justinianic circuit wall. The marble decoration of the gate was discovered, previously known from descriptions and plans of the area. The rectangular tower is preserved to a height of around 5m; its west side set upon the foundations of the Hadrianic building, visible in the adjacent plot on Adrianou 78.   

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Aghios Ioannis Rentis, Piraeus Avenue 256, School of Fine Arts. Charikleia Koilakou (1η ΕΒΑ) reports on the discovery of a road and a wine press. The road is 4 m. wide and has retaining walls on both sides. It is paved with clay and gravel. The wine press is a rubble construction, contains spolia, and was lined internally with hydraulic concrete. Its floor was constructed with marble slabs in secondary use. It is dated in the Middle and Late Byzantine periods. 

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Kythera, Chora castle, Christ Pantokrator Church. Charikleia Koilakou (1η ΕΒΑ) reports on the discovery of burials under the church floor. The burials contained 16-17thc. Venetian coins, which include a sessino (1595-1605) and a gazzeta from Candia (1653-1654), a copper ring (Fig 1), two Turkish coins, coffin nails, and copper studs from garments.

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Plaka, 5 Dioskouron Street (property of Andrattol Ltd). Nikos Tsoniotis (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavation in the plot. A channel constructed with rubble runs E-W, under the cobbled floor reported the previous year (Fig. 1). The mouth of an oval shaft was revealed east of this channel. The shaft appears to have been used as a grey water tank.  Sections of walls were excavated east and west of the silo reported in 2005. A facility relating to the production of lime was identified adjacent to one of these walls. Finds from this area include undecorated and glazed post-Byzantine sherds dating in the 14th and 16th centuries, as well pottery dating in the 18th and 19th centuries. The lime production facility dates from the latter period. Excavations on the interior of the modern residence revealed a poros wall and two terracotta pipes (Fig. 2). Finds from the pipes include a fragment from the rim of a Classical amphora (4th c.) and a sherd dating in the second half of the 2nd c. B.C. Numerous strata were excavated adjacent to the wall. The earliest is dated in the second half of the 5th c. A.D. The others are dated in the 12th c., 13th c. and the late Byzantine period. The 13th c. stratum contained a coin minted at the time of William I de la Roche (1280-1287). Additionally, finds from an excavation trench in the southwest corner of the modern residence indicate that this space was also used in the 7th c. A.D., between the 10th and 12th centuries, and finally in the 16th and 17th centuries. The aforementioned poros wall (Fig. 2) bears similarities to the excavated sections of the retaining wall of the Street of the Tripods. Additionally, its location coincides with the route of this Street. The excavator therefore identifies this wall as another section of the aforementioned, late Classical to Hellenistic retaining wall. Other finds from the plot include 600 fragments of marble architectural members, 55 fragments of sculptures and inscriptions, a marble olive-press, and a marble round basin which was dated by M. Korres to 1800. Both Korres and Tanoulas identified this find as a reworked, ionic column drum from the Propylaia. Finally, part of the head of a statue was extracted from the wall of a modern fireplace (Fig 3). The portrait statue is dated in the 2nd half of the 2nd c. A.D.

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Athens, Areos Street. D. Sourlas (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the excavation of the NW corner of the courtyard of the Hadrian’s Library (Figs 1, 2). Opus caementicium had been used in order to create a flat courtyard on top of the northwards sloping bedrock. The courtyard was paved with pentelic marble slabs, which had been placed on a thick layer of hydraulic concrete. It extended in front of the whole of the north wing of the Library. Finally, the space underneath the courtyard consisted of three oblong, vaulted rooms forming a cryptoporticus. The use of this space remains unknown. The ancient road, running N-S, passed west of the cryptoporticus. It connected the Library with the Acropolis and the Roman Agora. Finds from the area include few fragments from architectural members and a fragment from a relief depicting a clothed, female figure. 

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Athens, Hadrian’s Library. D. Sourlas (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on new discoveries in the precinct of Hadrian’s Library. After the removal of the conservation labs and modern storerooms from the site (Fig 1), the following finds were excavated: a) The basement of the Ottoman barracks. This is an oblong room with rubble walls and four strong pillars. The remains of a stairway were located at its eastern end (Figs 2, 3). b) An Ottoman (or later) cistern (Fig 4). c) The SW corner of the South Oikema of Hadrian’s Library (Fig 5, 6). The Oikema was constructed from aktite stone. Five block courses were excavated. Two walls by the west wall of the Oikema may belong to the Ottoman barracks. Drains and floors were also revealed and dated in the Ottoman or later periods. Additional finds include numerous fragments from architectural parts, sculptures and inscriptions; amongst these are a column bearing an inscription in Latin, a fragment from an altar for votive offerings (Fig 7), part of a marble statuette of a seated female deity (Fig 8), and a decorated fragment from the entablature of a building (Fig 9).  

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Athens, Kladou 6 (property of E. Nomikou). N. Sarga and K. Tsogga (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on further excavations in the basement of a modern building, which lies east of the Athenian Agora. The following finds were revealed: a) Architectural parts, dating from the Late Roman to the middle Byzantine period (Fig 1). b) A Byzantine wall, which may belong to the church of Aghios Thomas (Fig 2). c) The remains of a bath complex. These include 3 walls (Figs 3), a rectangular bathtub constructed from white and grey-green marble slabs (Fig 4), mortar floors, part of the vent of the hypocaust, and the foundations of a cistern (Fig 5). Other finds from the area include fragments of white, ash-green, red and multicoloured marble slabs, and glass sherds from unguentaria. The excavated bath complex is likely associated with Hadrian's Gymnasium, excavated by ASCSA in the Athenian Agora. It appears to have been in operation from Hadrianic to Late Roman/Early Christian times.

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Plaka, Adrianou 96 (Benizelon Mansion) Nikos Tsoniotis (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the excavation of another section of the Late Roman wall (Figs 1, 2). As with other revealed sections, stone blocks were used for the construction of the outer faces and rubble for the fill of the wall. The remains of two Byzantine buildings, dating in the 11th-12th and 13th-14th centuries respectively, were identified. The first had been constructed adjacent to the wall, whilst the second had been built on top of the wall. A cist grave and a burial pit were also excavated. The cist grave is adjacent to the walls’ euthynteria and contained 5th-6th c. and 12th-13th c. A.D. pottery sherds. The grave appears to have been set along the ancient road connecting the Roman Agora with Hadrian’s Library. The burial pit contained bones and crania of a minimum of 11 adult individuals. The bones were covered by a layer containing Middle Byzantine (12th-13th c.) pottery sherds. Additional finds include architectural parts and 40 fragments of statues and inscriptions. 

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Alimos, Alimos Metro Station, Kontopegado. K. Kaza-Papageorgiou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Mycenaean workshop with an extensive water-management system, adjacent to the area of the Early Helladic and Mycenaean settlements (AD 42: 68-68; 48: 66-69). The water-management system consists of four large water channels and 41 rock-cut shafts (Figs 1, 2). Most shafts are square-shaped with rounded corners, and all of them are connected together via smaller channels (Figs 3, 4). A Mycenaean wall was excavated south of the shafts and appears to have belonged to the enclosure of the workshop. Additionally, 7 wells were found: 3 Mycenaean and 4 Classical. One of the Mycenaean wells had been used as a deposit and contained numerous LH IIIB-IIIC and few LHIIIA pottery sherds. Finds from the area of the workshop include Mycenaean kylikes, skyphoi, craters, lekanes, jugs, amphorae, hydrias, cooking pots and numerous bathtubs (Fig 5). Many of the latter were found in situ (Fig 6). Finally, numerous figurines, few steatite whorls and pieces of obsidian were also found. The workshop dates in the 13th-12th C. B.C. and was used for the processing of flax. It could have also accommodated activities like basket weaving. Numerous partially-fired sherds (Fig 7) indicate that a large ceramic workshop was also in operation in the area. Nevertheless, the exact location of the latter remains unclear. The south part of the Mycenaean workshop (Fig 8) appears to have also been used in the Classical period (5th and 4th c.). Finds from this period include numerous pottery sherds, loom weights, fragments from pithoi, and black-glazed fragments from a kernos. During this period the workshop was either used for the processing of flax or wool. N. Mouka and P. Koutis worked at the excavation.

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Elliniko, Argyroupoli Metro station. K. Kaza-Papageorgiou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on continuing excavations in the area. North Sector: Wall remains, a shallow pit, part of a retaining wall and a road were revealed. The shallow pit which had been used as a deposit contained 3rd c. B.C. pottery sherds. Finally, a rock-cut well was excavated, which contained 5th-4th c. B.C. pottery sherds. South Sector: A pi-shaped burial enclosure was found. The enclosure contained no graves. A sarcophagus containing a bronze mirror was found west of the enclosure (Fig 1). Numerous votive offerings were found in the area. Cemetery: Until 2008 the following have been excavated: 50 pyres, 10 sarcophagi and 3 shaft graves (Figs 2, 3, 4). These date in the 7th-4th centuries B.C. The cemetery had a pi-shaped enclosure and pedestals for the placement of funerary stelai. Few of these were found in situ. Many had been discarded in a 2nd c. A.D. well. The latter contained part of a stele depicting a loutrophoros, a stele depicting a man wearing a himation (Fig 5), a stele depicting a hoplite, part of a marble lekythos, a plaque with an inscription, and part of a marble lion. The lion would have stood on the wall of the enclosure, since another part of it was found in situ. Despite the fact that most burials had been looted in antiquity and in recent years, some of them contained valuable finds: bronze mirrors, strigils, plaques and numerous pots. The excavation was supervised by E. Markopoulou.

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Moschato, 26 Artemidos and Grammou Streets (O.T. 143, property of G. Koronios & Sons Co.) A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a Classical well, constructed with terracotta tiles (Figs 1, 2, 3). The well dates in the late 5th- early 4th c. B.C. and appears to have been filled in the late 2nd-ealy 1st c. B.C. with rubble, (roof) tiles and numerous sherds. Its mouth had also been sealed with a pile of rubble stones (Fig 4). Finally, a concentration of pottery was found west of the well (Fig 5). This includes sherds from 5 amphorae dating in the late 6th-5th c. B.C., and from two plain ware vessels. 

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Moschato, 30 Piraeus Avenue (O.T. 219, property of ROTATION). A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a Classical water supply/drainage system. It lies within the Long Walls and it either served the water needs of the population that gathered there in times of war or as a drainage system for the walls and the moat. It consists of 3 wells (two of which are constructed with terracotta tiles), a cistern, a drain and walls (Figs 1, 2, 3, 4). The drain is dated in Peisistratan times. Small finds from the area include terracotta loom weights, numerous lead clamps, pottery sherds, fragments of stone tools, shells and fragments of lamps. The finds, which date in the Archaic and Classical periods, are indicative of local agricultural activities, which would have also benefited from the water system.

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Moschato, Knossou, Thermopylon and Xenophontos Streets (O.T. 91, property of A. and A. Michalodimitraki). A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a road and a roadside settlement (Figs 1, 2). The road had retaining walls on both sides. Aktite stone from the Piraeus had been used in the construction of some of the walls in the settlement. Two construction phases are discernible, which are dated in the Hellenistic period. The use of the aktite stone is associated with the earlier phase. Both the road and the settlement are linked to the nearby sanctuary of Kybele. 

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Moschato, 49-51-53 Eleutherias St. (O.T. 76, property of D. Mpathrellos, E. Mpathrellos and A. Antonopoulos Co.). A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of an early Classical kiln, a rubbish pit and a road. The kiln is of the typical circular type and is well-preserved (Figs 1, 2). Benches run along its interior. Numerous pottery sherds, including plain ware, coarse ware, fine ware, few black-glazed and tiles, were excavated from its interior. Amongst these a bronze awl was found. The rubbish pit was filled with the same types of pottery sherds and is associated with the kiln. Finally, a road was excavated. It has no retaining walls and its connection to the kiln is doubtful. 

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Moschato, 120 Platonos St. (O.T. 120, property of N. Orfanoudakis & D. Stagiannos & Co.). A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of late 5th c. walls (Figs 1, 2, 3, 4).

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Aghios Ioannis Rentis, 161-163 Piraeus Avenue, Flemming and Neou Phalerou Streets (O.T. 24-25, property of Rentis A.E.). Y. Spyropoulos (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an Archaic building complex and a Classical road. The rectangular-shaped complex consists of a central courtyard and perimetrically set rooms (Figs 1, 2). There are three rooms on the north side, two of which have benches running along one of their walls. The south and west sides have identical layouts: a stoa with rooms at the ends of both sides. Both stoas were entered from the central courtyard via a propylon. The column bases of the propyla (two in each propylon) remain in situ. The west stoa has benches of similar construction to those found at the north side of the complex. A circular hearth lay in the centre of the courtyard. The complex was entered from the east side, which is nevertheless not preserved. A drain was excavated in the SE corner of the complex. A peribolos wall ran along the east, south and west sides of the complex. Two walls and a gate constitute the remains of the eastern peribolos entrance. Amongst the small finds excavated from the complex is the handle of an archaic kantharos with the inscription ΤΟ ΔΙΟΝΥΣ. According to the excavator the find indicates that festivals in honour of Dionysus were held in the complex or alternatively that the complex was a sanctuary of Dionysus. A 5th c. B.C. road with two retaining walls was excavated south of the complex (Figs 3, 4). A cemetery was found on the east side of this road. The burials include 2 inurned cremations, 2 pyres, a shaft grave and a tile grave. A stone ballot box and two amphorae were found in one of the pyres. 

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Alimos, Panagouli Square. I.Demaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an 8th-5th c. B.C. cemetery (Fig. 1). In total 44 burials were partly or fully excavated. These include 31 pyres, 10 shaft graves and 3 cist graves. Finds from the late Geometric graves and pyres include primarily cups, an amphora and an oinochoe. The classical pyres and burials produced broken lekythoi (some white-ground), and a spindle whorl.

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Voula, Aulonos and Antiocheias Streets (O.T. 178, property of N. Chiotaki). Y. Kouragios, M. Giamalidi and L. Makradema (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a well and a shaft grave, both of which contained intact Geometric pots (Fig. 1).

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Vouliagmeni, Aster Pallas Hotel. Y. Kouragios, M. Giamalidi and L. Makradema (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of structures dating from prehistoric to late Classical times. First, the cistern north of the temple of Apollo Zoster, which had been revealed in 1960, was uncovered for the second time (Fig. 1). (AD 16: 40). Once again, it was not fully excavated, since it was full of water. Four more areas were excavated along the coastline (Fig. 2): Area1: This lies close to the temple of Apollo Zoster. A building consisting of three rooms was found. Small finds from the building include sherds from plain ware, storage vessels and black-glazed pots. Additionally, a bronze nail and a lead clamp were found. Area 2: This lies on the side of the hill near the temple. Walls and numerous small finds were revealed. The latter include plain ware sherds, amphorae sherds, an intact pointed amphora, an intact crater and two bronze arrow heads. The finds date in the time of the Chremonidian War (267-262 B.C.). Area 3: This lies north of area 2 and contained architectural remains and the following small finds: plain ware sherds, black-glazed sherds, amphorae sherds and bronze arrow heads. These finds too date in the time of the Chremonidean War. Area 4: The area (Fig. 3) lies on top of the aforementioned hill. Part of a late Neolithic (3000 B.C.) settlement was uncovered. A megaron-like structure is interpreted as a religious and political centre. Small finds from the area include a figurine of a female form, terracotta phalluses, a frying pan, obsidian and flint blades, obsidian spearheads, stone axes and jewelry made of bone. 

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Vari, Maroti St. (property of I.Yannopoulou and E. Samova). L. Makradema and A. Andreou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a building complex consisting of six rooms. The rooms contained loom weights, bronze coins, numerous broken and intact vessels (pyxides, jugs, terracotta lamps, skyphoi, pithoi, amphorae, kantharoi, lids from lekanides, plates and cups), iron and lead lumps, metal clamps, a terracotta figurine of a male form, a seashell, a spindle whorl, and a lead weight. Room 2 also contained a paved floor, room 3 a bench, and room 5 a foundation deposit. The complex belongs to the deme of Anagyrus as testified by an inscription, which bears the deme’s name and was excavated in room 3. Based on the finds the complex is dated in the late 5th – early 4th c. B.C. and is identified as a workshop.

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Vari, Papafoti and P. Triantafyllou Streets (O.T. 170, property of M. Kapetanaki). Ch. Kazazaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a building complex consisting of six walls. Adjacent to the walls lie a semicircular pyre which contained few sherds, a rock-cut deposit pit which contained few sherds and animal bones, and an ancient road, which had retaining walls on both sides (Figs 1, 2). The pottery sherds date in the Classical period.

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Vari, 30 Anastasiou St. (O.T. 163, property of Petropoulou). Ch. Kazazaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a burial mound and an ancient road to its west (Fig 1). The excavation was not completed. 

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Vari, Vas. Konstantinou St. and Paideias pedestrian street (property of Ramfou-Pergalia). Ch. Kazazaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of three walls, one of which is semicircular (Fig 1). Few classical pottery sherds were found.

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Vari, Anagyrous Avenue (O.T. 352, property of Makropoulou). Ch. Kazazaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a late Classical workshop. It consisted of eight rock-cut pits, two walls and two rock-cut grooves. One of the pits was circular and plastered with hydraulic mortar internally. It contained an intact 3rd c. B.C. unguentarium. The remaining pits contained plain-ware sherds and few black-glazed sherds.

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Lathouriza-Vari, (property of Pittara). Ch. Kazazaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of Classical architectural remains and a Late Geometric cemetery (Fig 1). A pi-shaped structure was excavated. A small room within this structure contained 5 intact, undecorated, pointed amphorae in situ, numerous amphora sherds, a large quantity of table ware, and few bones and shells. The structure appears to have been the enclosure of the Late Geometric cemetery, which was nevertheless constructed in Classical times. An ash layer in the SE corner of the structure contained plain and table ware, large quantities of black- and red-glazed  vessels (plates, skyphoi, lekythoi), Classical black- and red-figure vases of various sizes, animal bones, shells, and lead and bronze artefacts. The area of the ash layer is interpreted as a space where offerings were placed. A semi-circular pit nearby is identified as a deposit pit. The Late Geometric cemetery occupies the north part of the excavated area (Fig. 1). It consists of two burial clusters which include 14 shaft graves and 11 inurned cremations. One burial cluster has a N-S orientation and the second an E-W one. The placement of the bodies in the shaft graves was in accordance with the orientation of the relevant cluster (Figs 2, 4, 5). Burial offerings from the shaft graves include skyphoi, trefoil-mouthed oinochoae, jugs, phialae, plates, cups and pyxides (Fig 3). 2 of the shaft graves (7 and 13) contained two burials (Fig 6). The inurned cremations were found either amongst or on top of the shaft graves. The amphorae containing the cremations in some cases also contained miniature vessels (cups, phialae, jugs and trefoil-mouthed oinochoae). 6 pyres were found in the south part of the excavation area. These were enclosed by a semi-circular and 3 straight walls. One of the pyres contained 6 Corinthian aryballoi. 2 shallow, rock-cut pits lie SW of the pyres. Intact Corinthian aryballoi, decorated alabastra, terracotta animal figurines, a terracotta figurine of an enthroned female form, and numerous pottery sherds were found in the area of the 2 pits. As a result, this area too appears to have served for the placement of offerings. Finally, a second pi-shaped structure was found in the SE corner of the plot. It contained numerous bronze and lead artefacts, and plain ware sherds. It also contained a well with rock-cut steps.

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Vari-Varkiza, ancient deme of Anagyrus (O.T. 194, property of N. Spyrou). M. Kassimi-Soutou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a rectangular basement building. Its walls were irregularly constructed and it contained a stone staircase. The floor consisted of sand and gravel. A colonnette with its base was found in the building. Small finds include undecorated pottery sherds, handles, amphora toes, fragments from pithoi, few black-glazed sherds, 3 terracotta loom weights, a bronze coin, grindstones, 2 limestone tools, lead clamps, and parts of a bathtub. The building is identified as the storeroom of a house dating in the second half of the 4th c. B.C. A pit was found NE of this building. The pit contained sherds from pointed amphorae, pithoi, and black-glazed vessels. It also contained an Agora 25B-type lamp, which dates in the mid 4th – first quarter of the 3rd c. B.C.

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Vari-Varkiza, 34 Hephaistou St., ancient deme of Anagyrus (O.T. 21, property of Ntouni). M. Kassimi-Soutou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of houses and agricultural facilities (Fig 1). A rock-cut drain directed rainwater to nearby wells. The best preserved structure was a basement building with a staircase (Figs 2, 3, 4). It contained sherds from pithoi, shells and olive pits. Additionally, a pit was found constructed for the placement of a large storage pithos. A triangular structure which appears to have supported a superstructure was found adjacent to the west wall of the basement. 

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Vari-Varkiza, Terpsichoris and Hephaistou Streets, ancient deme of Anagyrus (property of Moraitis). M. Kassimi-Soutou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a fifth-century B.C. house. It contained few pottery sherds.

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Vari-Varkiza, Dimitras and Artemidos 30 Streets, ancient deme of Anagyrus (property of Anastasiou). M. Kassimi-Soutou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two buildings, an ancient road and a large courtyard (Figs 1, 2). Building A, which lies in the north part of the excavation area, is a large pi-shaped building with a NW-SE orientation. Two statue bases were found NW of it. One base bears a cutting for the right foot of a statue and the the second bears small, semicircular cuttings. Both bases were contained by an enclosure and are contemporary with the building. A piriform cistern lies in the SW corner of the building and contained 3 intact, black-glazed kantharoi (4th c.), large fragments from 3 plates, 3 bowls, one lekanis and one amphora, as well as numerous sherds from plain ware and black-glazed fine ware. Bones, shells, stone tools and a lead artifact were also retrieved. Small finds from the rest of the building include mainly undecorated and black-glazed pottery sherds. All finds date in the Classical period. Building B, which lies in the south part of the excavation area, is a large, basement structure accessed by two staircases (Fig 3). A destruction layer from inside the building contained numerous stones, pottery sherds and roof tiles. The building had a pebble floor which was largely destroyed. Small finds from the interior of this building include sherds from plain and table ware (amphorae, lekanides, skyphoi, plates, bowls, pithoi), black-glazed vessels (skyphoi, plates, lekythoi, lamps, kantharoi, saltcellars, amphoriskoi, lekanides), a broken animal figurine, 2 pyramidal loom weights, 2 intact lamps (4th c.), a terracotta seal, part of a mould, the neck of a decorated lekythos, 4 bronze artefacts, a bronze coin, an iron nail, part of a stone colonnette, a fragment from a large, stone vessel, part of a stone drain, stone tools, an obsidian blade and a lead artefact. The finds date in the 5th-4th c. B.C. The ancient road lies west of Building B and had retaining walls on both sides. Its orientation is NW-SE. Numerous small walls and pits were found in the area of the courtyard. Additional structures in the courtyard include a semicircular structure (Fig 4) which contained numerous pottery sherds, and a nearby, semicircular deposit pit. The latter contained sherds from plain and table ware, fragments from roof-tiles, black-glazed sherds from small and large vessels, a bronze object, a flint blade and an obsidian blade. Finally, another structure is identified as an oven or a small kiln. The entire complex is dated in the 6th-4th c. B.C based on the pottery and the masonry (some walls are polygonal). The complex is interpreted as a sanctuary accommodating a mystery cult; possibly the cult of the Mother of the Gods, which is mentioned by Pausanias. This interpretation is based on the cistern which was found in the interior of Building A, the statue bases, and the size of the buildings. The oven or kiln structure could also indicate that a small workshop operated in the courtyard, in order to serve the needs of the two large buildings. 

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Piraeus, Lambraki, Distomou and Androutsou Streets (property of MEKTEMA Co). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an extensive quarry with six courses of block extraction (Fig 1). Lines of chisel cuts were preserved. A late Hellenistic building, postdating the quarry and consisting of two rooms, was found in the quarry’s precinct. Finally, a stone missile from a catapult was recovered.

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Piraeus, 154-156 Deligiorgi St. (property of I. Graos). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a classical building complex. The complex, which lies on the west foot of Mounichia hill consisted of two walls forming a corner. Two ancient streets run parallel to these walls, thus delimiting two sides of the complex. Drains run off both streets. In addition, the water-provisioning system relating to this complex was identified. It consisted of two cisterns, which were linked by a five-meter long shaft, and a well. 

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Piraeus, 111 Neorion St. (property of Kavarlingos). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two quarries on the west foot of Mounichia hill. The first quarry was partly filled and built over in the 4th c. B.C. Two walls attest to this subsequent building activity. A drain ran diagonally inside one of the rooms. The second quarry had 5 courses of block extraction and the extraction channels were well-preserved (Fig 1). Like the previous one, it was built over in the beginning of the 4th c. B.C. A well constitutes the only witness for this later building activity. 

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Piraeus, 88 Soteirou Dios St. (property of G. Rozaki). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a retaining wall on the west foot of Mounichia hill. Due to the steepness of the hill, houses were constructed on it on different levels supported by retaining walls. The excavated wall dates in the Classical period (Fig 1). A floor and a cistern were excavated from the lower level delimited by the wall. 4 bronze Athenian coins dated in 339 B.C. were found in the fill of this house. Finally, part of another floor was excavated from the upper level created by the retaining wall.

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Piraeus, 3 Kleanthous and 4 Mouson Streets (property of E. Aktypi-Goune), 5 Kleanthous and 6 Mouson Streets (property of I. Lazaridi), 4 Kon. Manou Street (property of A. Tasiouli and Aik. Kompogiorga). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two quarries on the west/ southwest foot of Mounichia hill. The first quarry, which lies in the first two properties, is dated in the 5th-4th c. B.C. Finds from there include bases from black-glazed pots, loom weights and coarse pottery sherds. The second quarry, which lies in the third property, preserved extraction channels.

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Piraeus, 27 Minoos and 62-66 Al. Papanastasiou Streets (property of Ellinika Erga Co). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a wall of the Mounichia shipsheds. The wall has a 13% gradient. 

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Piraeus, 15 Neosoikon St. (property of G. Lampiris and Co Constructions). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of three cisterns and drains. One of the cisterns contained numerous coarseware, black-glazed sherds, lamps, loomweight, bronze coins and the base of a black-glazed pot with the inscription [---] χου μὴ ἅπτου.

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Piraeus, 25-27 and 33a Herodotou St. (properties of Kon. Lambrou and Asimakopoulou respectively). K. Axioti (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of 2 quarries 2 cisterns and a shaft. The first quarry preserved the extraction channels. 

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Moschato, 1 Kondyli St. (property of METRO). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of Geometric settlement remains. Three building phases of use in the Geometric period were identified. An isolated inurned cremation in a piriform jar was excavated in the SW corner of the property. The jar also contained two cups and a miniature oinochoe. 

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Moschato, 14 Patmou and Perivolion Streets (property of Chr. Papanakou). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an ancient road and a 4th c. B.C. cemetery. The road has retaining walls on both sides and attests to three phase of use. The cemetery NE of the road consists of 6 pyres and one sarcophagus with a female burial. The pyres contained a corroded iron nail and a strigil. The sarcophagus contained a squat lekythos, an alabastron, a bronze mirror, 2 bronze hoops, a small lekanis with its lid, a phialidio, a bronze pin, 2 bone buttons and three bronze nails. It is dated in the first half of the 4th c. B.C.

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Moschato, 75 Eleutherias St. (property of Kal. Nikolopoulou). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a section of the south Long Wall. The wall was found under a Late Roman floor (Figs 1, 2).

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Kallithea, 104 Demosthenous and 29 Iphigeneias Streets (O.T. 129a, property of I. Kyriakopoulos-S. Kontoulis - B. Tzoumas OE), 106 Demosthenous St. (O.T. 109a, property of Sot. Mazote). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an ancient road and a 5th c. B.C. cemetery. The road has a NE-SW orientation and retaining walls on both sides. The cemetery, which lies N of the road, consists of 5 burials: 3 tile graves, a terracotta larnax and an inurned cremation. Finds from the burials include lekanides with their lids, a feeding bottle, a black-glazed lekythos, a squat lekythos and a cup-skyphos (Bolsal type).

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Tavros, 3 Daidalou St. (property of D. Lioli). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a cemetery. A poros sarcophagus, 4 tile graves, 3 shaft graves and 3 pyres were excavated. The burials date in the 3rd c. B.C. (mainly its second half) apart from one which dates in the late 4th – early 3rd c. B.C. The burial offerings indicate that at least 3 burials were female and 2 male. The offerings include phialidia, a flask, unguentaria, a salt cellar, a pyxis, kantharoi, a miniature plate, bronze mirrors, iron strigils, a bronze pin, and a miniature bronze, cylindrical vessel with its lid. Finds from the area of the cemetery include poros alabastra and a bronze obol. The cemetery was part of the complex of cemeteries north of the Long Walls. 

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Tavros, 18 Tompazi and Thessalonikis streets (property of Karaiskos). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a section of the south Long Wall (Fig 1). Its foundation trench dates it in the Perikleian building phase. A kiln was found adjacent to the wall.

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Aghios Ioannis Rentis, Themidos and Polykratous streets (O.T. 234, property of the Foundation of the Hellenic World). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of roads, burials and a farmstead. One of the roads dates in the Geometric period and has retaining walls on both sides (Fig 1). The following finds were recovered from the area of the road: glazed sherds, bones, shells, obsidian blades, a bronze arrowhead, fragments from glass vessels, fragments from green glass panes, and a Late Roman coin (341-346 A.D.). The road appears to have fallen out of use in the Classical period, since 2 fifth-century B.C. child burials were excavated on top of its retaining wall. The first child burial had been placed in a terracotta larnax together with two 5th c. B.C. lekythoi and a Corinthian, miniature kotyle. The second burial was an inurned cremation in an amphora. The amphora’s lid was a stone. The amphora contained remains of bones, a lekanis with its lid, a black-glazed kotyle and a blue glass-bead. South of these burials and alongside the Geometric road another 2 burials were excavated dating in the Geometric period (a pyre and a cist grave). Further south another, 3rd c. A.D. burial was found (Fig 2). It contained 10 intact and broken vessels, which include a trefoil-lipped oinochoe and part of a second one, 2 cooking pots, and 2 lamps. The Γ-shaped farmstead attests to two periods of use, a Hellenistic and a Roman one (2nd-3rd c. A.D.) (Fig 3). Its west wing consists of four, adjoining rooms facing a central courtyard. The walls and the floors in the rooms point clearly to the building’s 2 phases of use. The rooms contained an amphora toe (2nd-3rd c. A.D.), amphora sherds, sherds from cooking pots, fragments from glass vessels, shells, bones, lead clamps, nails, obsidian blades and a coin (350 or 330 B.C.). The east wing of the farmstead consists of two rooms, which are interpreted as storerooms or stables. The rooms contained similar finds to those excavated from the west wing and numerous fragments from lamps. A pi-shaped drain ran in the courtyard. The farmstead’s entrance looked to the east, towards a large enclosure and another road (Fig 4). The enclosure contained storerooms dating in the Hellenistic period. Six large rooms and few smaller ones were excavated. One room was used for the storing of wine and another of oil. A third is identified as a small wine press, serving the needs in wine of the farmstead. Finally, the road adjacent to the enclosure attests to three phases of use. The earlier one is in the Geometric period, since this road appears to have crossed the aforementioned, excavated Geometric road. 

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Athens, 85 Demosthenous St. L. Panagopoulou-Roka (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Late Roman workshop with hydraulic installations, and a Late Roman cemetery (Figs 1, 2). The hydraulic installations include a cistern and 4 pipes. These ensured the management and drainage of the plentiful water in the area S/SE of the Academy and were linked to the industrial nature of the area. The remains of the workshop include 16 walls attesting to four construction phases in Late Roman times. Finally the burials, which were extensively looted, date up to the 5th-6th c. A.D. 

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Athens, Kynosarges, 4 Diamantopoulou and Vourvachi streets. N. Sakka (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavation of the large Roman building known as the Hadrianic Gymnasium of Kynosarges (Figs 1, 2). Another part of its foundations was revealed. It was constructed in the opus caementicium and resembles closely the construction technique of the Library of Hadrian. A drain constructed in the opus testaceum ran under the foundations. 3rd-4th c. A.D. sherds and part of a 4th c. A.D. lamp were found in the drain. A square shaft, used for the collection of rainwater, was found near the drain. A layer containing numerous finds (Corinthian roof tiles, part of a threshold, Late Geometric, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and 2nd-3rd c. A.D. pottery sherds) was excavated north of the foundations. Finally, a Hellenistic road ran near the building. 

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Athens, Kolonos, 4-6 Keratsiniou St. (O.T. 82, property of A. Smyrniotaki and D. Stergiou). M. Kontopanagou (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on Classical, Hellenistic and Late Roman discoveries (Figs 1, 2). Classical period: A 5th c. road with a retaining wall was found. Additionally, 15 circular and 2 rectangular rock-cut pits were excavated. They contained black-glazed and black-figure sherds. Hellenistic period: Five burials were found: 3 tile graves, 1 pyre and 1 shaft grave. The burial offerings include 2nd c. B.C. unguentaria and an iron strigil. Late Roman-Early Christian period: A cistern (Fig 3) and three walls were excavated. The cistern had hydraulic concrete internally and is dated in the 6th c. A.D. Finally, numerous pits were found. They contained Early Christian sherds and building material. The excavations were supervised by A. Aggelopoulou and M. Kontopanagou.

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Athens, 38 Myllerou and M. Alexandrou Streets (old Metaxourgheio building). Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ reports on excavation in the basement of the old Metaxourgheio building (Figs 1, 2). Two Late Roman cisterns, two pi-shaped terracotta pipes, a shaft, a Roman house and 9 burials were found. Only two of the rooms of the house were excavated, and one of them contained a hearth. The walls were constructed with rubble stones and marble spolia. More walls attest to the house having been repaired at a later phase. The burials include a poros sarcophagus, a pyre and 7 pit graves, which date in Late Hellenistic-Early Roman times. The excavations were supervised by M. Zaglara, E. Sioula, and K. Christodoulou, and the drawings were created by K. Theocharidou.

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Athens, 5 Tompazi St. (property of N. Pantazi). Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ reports on the discoveries of Classical inurned cremations and a Roman bath (Figs 24, 25). The Classical remains from the plot include 3 walls and 2 inurned cremations. One of the latter was placed in an undecorated amphora, which also contained a second undecorated amphora and a frying pan. The remains of the Roman bath include three large walls and three drains, a corridor with three steps leading to the hypocaust, a pit identified as the praefurnium, three pi-shaped pipes and a terracotta impluvium. Additional finds include bronze coins, which have not been studied yet.

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Athens, Ano Petralona, 92 Troon St. (property of P. Metroulia-M. Mpalaska). Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ reports on the discoveries of a Late Classical-Early Hellenistic house and a 3rd-2nd c. B.C. burial. The walls of the house were constructed with rubble stones and spolia. Part of the pebble-floor of the andron was found. Sherds from drinking vessels were excavated from this room. A drain constructed with Laconian roof tiles ran along its floor and a well was found below it. The well, however, predates the house and appears to have fallen out of use with the construction of the andron. The burial is a pit grave containing a cranium and unguentaria.

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Aghia Paraskeui, Peukakia, 23 Aristomenous and Ethnarchou Makariou Streets (property of D. Apostolopoulos and Co.) D.N. Christodoulou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Byzantine cistern and numerous Byzantine sherds, some of which are glazed (Fig. 1). The latter are dated in the Middle Byzantine period.

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Pallene, Aghios Nikolaos, Pallenidos Athenas St. (O.T. 172, property of Emm. Perantzaki) D.N. Christodoulou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discoveries of a Geometric burial and a Byzantine farmstead. The pit grave contained a male skeleton, an amphora, a trefoil-lipped oinochoe, a plate, three skyphoi, two kantharoi, an iron knife and a bronze artefact. It dates in the 8th c. B.C. The Byzantine building was constructed with rubble walls. Five pithoi were found in one of the rooms. One of these had a stone slab as a lid on its rim. Six tile-built pithoi were found outside of the building. They were lined with mortar internally. Byzantine and Late Byzantine sherds and two bronze coins were found. 

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Pallene, Milisi St. D.N. Christodoulou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two burials. The first cist grave contained an adult and a child. The second cist grave contained only one adult. The graves were adjacent to each other and were only divided by a stone slab. No burial offerings were found.

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Kifissia, Xenias 3 (O.T. 175, property of Z. Katsiani and P. Voutiritsa). P. Zoubelou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a funerary peribolos and an ancient road (Fig. 1). The peribolos wall had been constructed with stone blocks. A T-shaped projection was excavated next to the wall, and most likely is the base for a funerary monument (Fig. 2). In addition, a marble lekythos was found showing two men and bearing the inscription ΤΕΛΕΣΙΠΠΟΣ ΤΕΛΕΣ[....] (Fig. 3). Another marble lekythos was found near the first one. The road had a retaining wall on its east side and is dated to the 5th-4th c. B.C. based on sherds found on it. A pit excavated next to the road contained 3 alabastra, and fragments from a red-figure loutrophoros and a red-figure kantharos. The latter date to the 4th c. B.C. A Roman terracotta pipe was found in that area. Finally, a second pit was excavated containing the bones of a horse and few undecorated pottery sherds. 

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AVERTISSEMENT
La Chronique des fouilles en ligne ne constitue en aucun cas une publication des découvertes qui y sont signalées.
L'EfA et la BSA ne peuvent délivrer de copie des illustrations qui y sont reproduites et dont ils ne détiennent pas les droits.