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Kirrha.  J. Zurbach (EfA) and D. Skorda (Ι' ΕΠΚΑ) report.   Following an exploratory season in 2007, research focused first on a complete topographical survey, integrating remains previously excavated, and, secondly, on geomorphological and pedological survey of the entire plain.  It is clear that from the LBA to LAntiquity, the shoreline lay 50−100m further out from the present coast, which means that the PH site cannot have been coastal: it is therefore argued that the so-called Cl and Hel dockyards (neoria) have probably been misidentified.  The courses of the 2 rivers have also changed greatly in recent times and their courses nowadays are almost entirely artificial. In the course of geophysical survey, several locations on the tell were surveyed (the presence of olive trees making complete coverage impossible).  What is probably a fossilized water course was traced W of the tell, which explains the abrupt line of the W hillslope which had been eroded by the flow of water, as well as the presence of a substantial terrace wall revealed during a rescue excavation conducted by the Ephoria.  The Cl circuit wall was located at several points, and the presence of corner towers is now certain.  Part of the Cl stoa, excavated in 1937 and 1938, was also securely located N of the mound.  This identification, along with that of the cemetery, provides a second fixed point from which to reconstruct the plan of the PH excavations of 1937−1938.  Finally, in the E sector, the survey plan sometimes presents features open to detailed interpretation, leaving open the possibility of an apse or parallel walls. PH levels are present in 2 areas S and N of the potter’s kiln. The survey has shown that the PH site corresponds closely to the tell, and it therefore seems that the settlement did not move substantially during the PH period.

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Kalapodi. W.-D. Niemeier (Director, DAI) reports on the 5th season of excavation, which continued to concentrate on the area of the S temple. West of the W pteron of the Ar S temple, destroyed by the Persians in 480 BC, its limestone W pediment was excavated, lying as it had fallen.  Whether and in what medium this pediment was decorated will only become clear after the  difficult recovery of the severely burnt blocks.  Also found in their fallen positions were terracotta fragments of the sima and the central acroterion (a horse protome).  The combination of wood and stone in this temple is of particular interest.  The stone pediment rested on wooden columns and a wooden entablature.  Fig. 1 shows N. Hellner’s restoration of the W façade. W of the W ramp, the remains of the W pediment were removed in the process of building a bronze foundry in the final quarter of the 5thCt BC.  Three moulding pits have so far been discovered, 2 contained remains of clay moulds destroyed after moulding in the lost-wax technique.  A working platform was constructed of reused roof tiles from the first Cl N temple, destroyed by an earthquake in 426 BC.  It appears that a statue for the second Cl temple was made here. In the Geo temple (discovered in 2007, since when its E part has been excavated), more of the metal votives placed at the time of its ritual interment, before the creation of a larger successor, were found.  They include iron lance points and knives, bronze necklaces, rings and bird pendants.  Of special interest is a bronze bowl with a repoussé relief of a circle of men, depicted frontally and touching each others’ hands (Fig. 2).  This is an import of N Syrian LHittite origin, a  find interpreted as indicating that the international significance of the sanctuary (noted by Herodotus I.46 for the 6th Ct) may have its origins as early as the 8thCt BC. In the NE, the excavation of the Myc strata was completed with the removal of 2 baulks.  This produced further important finds, mainly fragments of vessels used in the consumption of wine: cups, kylikes and kraters of the LHIIIC M phase with impressive figural decoration.  These include further pieces of a krater of which sherds had been found in previous excavations.  This bears a depiction so far unique (Fig. 3): men, armed with swords and carrying full sacks on poles over their shoulders, climb a ladder and enter a building, probably a  fortification, with its masonry rendered in a chequerboard pattern.  One man has fallen off the ladder and lies beneath it.  A notable votive from the Myc layers is a lentoid seal of the Island Sanctuaries Group in veined limestone, depicting 2 bulls standing back-to-back (Fig. 4).   The Central Archaeological Council has now authorized the removal of the open structure, constructed after the Persian destruction from spolia in the ruined cella.  It will therefore be possible to examine the older, Geo to Myc, phases here, in the assumed original centre of the sanctuary.

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Eastern Boeotia Archaeological Project (EBAP).  B. Burke (Canadian Institute/Victoria), B. Burns (Wellesley), S. Lupack (London), V. Aravantinos (Director, Θ' ΕΠΚΑ) and I. Fappas (Thebes Museum) report on the 2nd field season, which focused on the area surrounding the mod. village of Tanagra, in an effort to provide a context for several known centres: the Myc tombs at the locations of Dendron and Gephyra to the E of the village, the kastro located on the peak to the SW, and the Med tower to the NW.   Three teams of walkers surveyed 703 units within an area of 5km2, in which individual transects totalled 175 km.  Several of the chamber tombs, which contained the famous painted larnakes excavated in the 1960s and 1970s, were  located, as were indications of settlement remains.  The cemeteries were composed primarily of roughly hewn chambers cut into the natural bedrock.  The largest concentration of tombs around Eleon is below the Church of Profitis Ilias,  where over 20 chambers have been identified.  These were revisited and more extensively mapped in 2008.  A similar number of chamber tombs (Fig. 1) was mapped and surveyed in olive groves near mod. Tanagra, in a location known as Dendron, during the excavations by T. Spyropoulos.  Some impressive surface ceramics collected in 2008 in the vicinity of the tombs clearly date to the Myc period, including an LHIIB goblet with pendant rock pattern that predates the main phase of tomb deposition in LHIII. R. Siddal began a geological and petrographic survey of the survey area, focusing on the E side of the region, in order to complete a map of subsurface deposits, the sourcing of building material, and a reconstruction of tectonic history and shifts in water sources. 

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Thebes.  V. Aravantinos (Director, Θ' ΕΠΚΑ) and I. Fappas (Thebes Museum) report on a rescue excavation in the S part of the anc. acropolis. Earlier excavations in this sector had brought to light a  large Myc building complex (Fig. 1) with floors of square  bricks and fragments of wall-painting depicting a female  procession.  From July 2008 to January 2009, excavation at 3 Eurydike Street revealed a structure with a thick destruction layer of the M13th Ct, containing roof beams and cover tiles, many of which were found intact (and weighing between 8.5kg and 9.5kg each).  This roof is estimated to have weighed at least 4 tons, and covered impressive, if poorly preserved, architectural remains, probably part of the Myc palatial complex (Fig. 2). Two especially large and well-built walls with door jambs, built in the Myc style of large roughly worked boulders with smaller stones wedged between them, form a central area, which contained fragments of frescoes.  In the centre of the floor was a large bath tub with an impression on its base of a burnt basket which had been positioned next to it at the time of the destruction of the building.  N of this central area was a rectangular open corridor, and a large covered area.  From inside this room came much broken pottery, small glass beads with depictions in relief, burned fragments of painted wall-plaster, a steatite seal with a depiction of a horse and a gold attachment shaped like a flower petal.  A spacious rectangular room excavated further N completes the plan of the building. Numerous drinking vessels (kylikes and cups) were found, along with a bronze dagger with gold rivet heads.  However, the most important find was a 6-sided clay plaque (Fig. 3) with two holes for hanging, decorated with fish, possibly dolphin or tuna, on all 6 sides.  A similar object (Fig. 4) was found in the previous excavation, along with an impressive dagger handle and a fragment of a bronze dagger with gold rivet heads on the clay floor of the neighbouring room.  This also carried decoration on all four long sides, which are decorated alternately with a palm and chequered pattern. The building was destroyed by fire in the M13thCt BC.  The data from both this and earlier excavations on the top of the citadel show that the region was at this time a fairly luxurious and densely populated neighbourhood of Myc Thebes. 

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Thisbe (Kastorion).  A. Dunn (BSA/Birmingham) and E. Gerousi (Director, 23rd EBA) report on the 2008 study season. A Digital Elevation Model of the site was completed, and topographical and architectural surveys of all visible structures in and around Thisbe corrected and supplemented. Eleven EByz, MByz and Fr churches and chapels have been recorded: at least 2 are probably MByz of the inscribed cruciform plan with 4 central piers (spolia) and 3 semicircular apses.  Less typical is the ruined, multi-phase church now known as Ag. Loukas (almost certainly the Episcopal church of the bishopric of Kastorion).  Phase I of this building shows design traits related either to the high-status ‘transitional’ type of the L6th−9thCt or to the Panagia of Skripou (873/874 AD). The uppermost part of the central apse is entirely faced with well-arranged ashlars divided by a reused cornice.  Attached to the NW corner is a monumental cistern. Re-examination of the disposition of Cl−Rom architectural blocks in secondary use as orthostats in locations around the lower acropolis confirmed the outlines of several rectangular buildings which might be either Byz or associated with the diagnostically Fr chambered tower and spolia-built chapel. A record has been made of the traditional productive installations of the overlying village (Ot Kakosi; renamed Thisbe in the 20thCt).  These comprise 8 wine fermentation vats (ληνοι), 15 cobbled threshing floors (including 12 clustered around the lower acropolis) and monumental cisterns. A survey of Thisbe’s dam or barrage was completed.  There are no traces of the Rom or Byz phases reported by some EMod travellers, who almost certainly misinterpreted overlying spolia-built agricultural terraces, of which traces remain. The interpretation of this dam will be aided by a parallel environmental survey of the enclosed Thisbe basin. Anc. Thisve and Byz Kastorion had several loci of maritime traffic.  Between 2 of these, and visually controlling them both, lies an unpublished Cl−Hel tower described by E19thCt travellers. This was located and surveyed on behalf of the Θ' ΕΠΚΑ.

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Thespiai.  B. Slapšak (Netherlands Institute/Ljubljana) reports on the continuing survey of Thespiai as part of the Ancient Cities of Boeotia Project.   In 2008, geophysical prospection and the plotting of scattered blocks and architectural members continued.  Some blocks of the Hel city wall were found in situ in the NW sector. An important section of the mud-brick acropolis wall was recorded on the SW slope, 5.5m h. and 3.3m w. at its top.  Of the 29 inscriptions recorded by the team, 2 are of particular interest: one provides the first attestation at Thespiai of the office of the pentekistologoi; a second is a bilingual building inscription of Domitian, possibly dated to 86 AD.

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Lefkandi Xeropolis. I.S. Lemos (BSA/Oxford) reports on the 6th season of excavation. The aims for 2008 were to investigate further the LHIIIC and EIA ‘megara’ in region I and, in region II, to understand the function, extent and date of the ‘walls’ and to excavate further the structures W of them. In Region I, a LHIIIC (Lefkandi phase 2a) structure was discovered under the LHIIIC ‘megaron’ (Fig. 1).  This was equipped with clay bins and pebble floors typical of the period, and is on the same orientation as contemporary houses previously discovered.  The building was abandoned and the area reused after a short interval, but with an alteration to the orientation of the building (now N-S), which took place most probably during Lefkandi phase 2b when a number of other houses in this part of the tell maintain the earlier grid lines.  The 2nd change was to the plan of the building, which is now a long, rectangular structure.  The N end is lost to the erosion of the hill and the construction of a LGeo house, and it is therefore unclear whether or not the building was apsidal.  The duration of occupation of the LHIIIC ‘megaron’, as indicated by the pottery, is not yet determined, although it certainly includes White Ware of Lefkandi phase 2b/3, nor is the reason for its abandonment and thorough clearance.  Further study is also required to determine the interval between this abandonment and the erection of the EIA successor.   Investigation to the E of the buildings revealed more about the structure termed the ‘annex’, which seems to follow closely the history of occupation of both the LHIIIC and the EIA ‘megara’.  Further E, other walls similar in construction imply the existence of further rooms: while these were not investigated, they raise the possibility that there was a series of ancillary rooms or units to serve the needs of the ‘megaron’ during both its LHIIIC and EIA phases.  Finally, to the N and just outside the ‘megaron’ was the flexed skeleton of a young girl (to judge from the 2 pins found on the shoulders, a conical button and a pierced shell).  The date of the burial is hard to determine stratigraphically: it ought to be later than the pre-LHIIIC building, a date which agrees with the LHIIIC M−L date assigned to the pins. In Region II, the ‘walls’ are now understood as a complementary series of straight, lengthy constructions which defined the W and S edges of the ‘hollow’ zone (Fig. 2).  They may delineate the area through which the site was entered from the N, across the low land isthmus and between the possible 2 lagoons to the E and W of Xeropolis.  The date of their earlier phases should be primarily within LHIIIC.  Excavation has revealed detailed information about the sequence of construction and reconstruction of these walls, the locations of entrances and the insertion of drains.  The final abandonment of the S (interior) wall was accompanied by large-scale landscaping to cover the remains. The so-called ‘ritual’ zone (at present a term of convenience) was further investigated.  Structure A, dating to LHIIIC (Lefkandi phase 1), is the earliest yet recorded.  The irregularity of its form and the different construction techniques used indicate a complicated structural history: further excavation is needed to clarify its plan.  Two main floor surfaces of yellow clay were separated by a thin layer of intensely carbonized soil, probably not associated with a destructive fire.  Above the 2nd floor, a thicker mix of carbonized soil and pisé was observed.  The furniture in the rooms is highly distinctive.  Associated with the 1st floor are 2 yellow clay drums of different heights set against the middle of the S wall and a red-brown clay bin against the N wall. In the 2nd phase, another and larger yellow clay drum was set in the middle of the room, on the same N-S axis, and with it was found a large and shallow receptacle of reddish clay.  On top of the supporting surface for the receptacle, and within its limits, a complete large red-deer antler was carefully set (Fig. 3). Structure B to the S is a rectangular building (4.6m x 3.75m) similar in form to the partially overlying structure C, although its internal furniture and depositional history resemble that of structure A.  An intermediate position in both time and building type is indicated.  To its Wan exterior zone contains perhaps the earliest of the circular ‘platforms’ and a large shallow pit. Structure C, a two-phase building, is the latest so far discovered (in use between LHIIIC L and MPGeo): it overlies structure B, but its internal furnishing and depositional history are quite different. It contained circular ‘platforms’ made of different sized stones and pebbles.  A shallow rounded hollow was formed; its edge ringed with medium-sized stones to form a kerb within which similar and smaller stones were laid to make a close-packed ring.  Then ever smaller stones, pebbles and near-gravel were sequentially scattered to fill up the cracks. A slightly domed and compacted upper surface is the end result. No ash, burning or bones are associated.  A number of spindlewhorls and a few pendants were the only finds.  The only intrusive elements are sheets, lumps and flecks of a white plaster. Their appearance (never on a floor, nor attached to a wall or a feature) raises the question of whether structure C was roofed (no postholes were found in or around it).  Pottery discovered to the E of structure C includes large to monumental kraters and cooking pots found together with much animal bone.  Cooking appears to have taken place where the pots were found: thus eating and drinking took place outside, but close to, structure C. Although the purpose of these structures is not yet clear, we assume that the whole area associated with the ‘walls’ was devoted to some kind of ritual activity.  Indeed, the recovery in area R and to the N of the ‘walls’ of a number of high quality figurines may suggest that they originated from the so-called ritual area to the W.  Alternatively, the whole area may have been dedicated to the processing of olive oil or wine.  In this case the clay drums might have served as rests for the vessels in which olives or grapes were crushed, with receptacles set lower on the floor or on another drum nearby.  In order to resolve this, samples have been taken from the dark soils and from the clay drums for testing.  Residues from the environmental samples will be further scrutinized for evidence of any fruits discarded.

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Eretria. S. Fachard and T. Theurillat (Swiss School) report on a rescue excavation conducted in collaboration with the ΙΑ' ΕΠΚΑ (under A. Psalti) on the property (O.T. 737) of P. Vrakas, S of the plot excavated by P. Themelis between 1974 and 1984 (O.T. 740, summarized in PAE [1984], 212−28) (Fig. 1).  The goal was to verify the extension of some structures discovered by P. Themelis and to ascertain the different chronological phases represented on the plot. In the Geo period, 2 walls to the E protected the sector from intense flooding.  M23 served as an embankment wall, preserving the settlement to the W from the sands and pebbles of the river to the E.  It was built in ca. 725 BC, abandoned at the end of the 8th Ct and replaced by a 2nd embankment wall (M24).  The function of M22 is more difficult to assess, since it seems unlikely to belong to the apsidal building, GG, restored by Themelis. The current absence of floor levels, pits or graves suggests that the area lies on the periphery of this settlement quarter.  Occasional finds in the deepest layers include a small Neo serpentine axe and a MGeoII Attic krater (Fig. 2). Ar and Cl layers are rare, to the point that some Hel strata follow Geo layers.  This may imply that the sector was scarcely occupied during these periods, although later construction has certainly obliterated earlier layers. Most of the 2008 discoveries date to the Hel period. Several phases can be distinguished between the very end of the 4thCt BC and the 1st Ct BC.  The N of the plot is occupied by a small street lined with 2 walls (M32 and M1).  In a first phase, 2 pits (St33 and St19) of the first half of the 3rdCt BC were found S of M1.  The pottery is mainly domestic in character, with a high proportion of cooking ware (lekanes, chytres, mortars, lopades) and drinking vessels (bowls and kantharoi).  Several walls could belong to this first phase of occupation: M30 and probably M20 and M12.  The floor level related to this phase is at 3.9masl.  In a 2nd phase, M30 and M20 were reused to form a quadrangular building (8m x 6m) composed of deep foundation walls (M4, M11, M16 and M17). The pottery associated with the foundation trench suggests a tpq in the M2ndCt BC.  Its function remains unclear since no clearly identifiable structures have been discovered inside.  A well (St26) in the NW corner is probably contemporary, although it could also belong to the previous phase.  Numerous finds related to metalworking were discovered in the immediate surroundings of the building: a low-shaft furnace (St3), connected with burned layers, slags and iron ‘skullcaps’, testifies to ore refining.  M1 was probably pierced during the same phase, in order to install a threshold and canalization (St25) for the evacuation of waste water in the street.  A coin hoard (St15) containing more than 30 badly preserved bronze coins was discovered at the foot of M12; their identification is not possible at present. Although P. Themelis’ excavations showed that the entire quarter was densely occupied in the Rom period, few Rom remains were discovered in 2008.  To the W, 2 foundation walls (M6 and M7) can be linked to the monumental building excavated by Themelis.  To the E, a thick deposit of the 2nd and 3rd Cts AD seals the Hel occupation.  This contains numerous fragments of glass and terracotta figurines, Italian sigillata, several lamps with decorated discuses and 3 coins of the Imperial period. This first campaign on the O.T. 737 plot confirmed P. Themelis’ chronology of the Quarter of the Panathenaic Amphorae (O.T. 740) and supplements the plan of an important urban sector of the town occupied from the Geo to the Rom period.

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Cornell Halai and East Lokris Project (CHELP). J. Coleman (ASCSA/Cornell) reports on continuing study of the Neo architecture and finds (especially pottery) from the acropolis of Halai. Cleaning and conservation work on the acropolis of Halai continued throughout the season.  In area F, cleaning operations focused on the Byz intrusion at the E side of trench F9 first noticed by Virginia Grace in 1931 and on the S sides of trenches F9 and F11, where, during preparations for a path and viewing station for visitors, the probable S wall of Neo building VI was revealed. 

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Mitrou. E. Zahou (ΙΔ' ΕΠΚΑ) and A. Van de Moortel (ASCSA/Tennessee) report on the 5th season of excavation in 2008, which focused primarily on 2 areas in the NE and NW of the islet. In addition, 3 outlying trenches were opened in previously unexcavated areas in the NE corner (LR797), at the E sea scarp (LX784) and in the central-E area (LR770) of the islet (Fig. 1). The earliest levels reached dated to EHIIB.  In trench LX784, at least 2 EHIIB occupational levels with substantial walls were found, situated close to sea level.  EHIIB and EHIII levels were also exposed during cleaning of the W sea scarp of the islet, and EHIII walls were uncovered in trench LR797 in the NE corner of the islet.  The EH settlement was therefore extensive.  In all these locations, fired roof tiles were found as well as Lefkandi I pottery and EH vessels of the local tradition. Too little was exposed to understand building plans or the layout of the settlement.  A clay seal found in the sea NW of the islet may be EHII in date. The MH settlement may have been equally extensive, with architectural remains identified at the E and W sea scarps as well as in the NE and NW excavation areas.  A LMH wall (no. 149) and pebble surface were uncovered E of and below the LHI−LHIIIA2 E monumental building D in the NE excavation area (trench LP783) (Fig. 2).  These are the first securely dated remains of the MH settlement in this area.  In the NW excavation area, at least 5 successive MHI and MHII occupation strata and cist tombs were excavated in 2007.  A wooden boat partially excavated in 2007 has now been dated to MHI.  In trench LX784, on the E sea scarp, at least 5 successive MHI and MHII strata were likewise uncovered, including 2 rectilinear buildings: building K (MHI−MHII E) and building L (MHI).  Too little was exposed to reveal the plan of those buildings.  Building K had at least 2 rooms; its northernmost exposed room had a built oval hearth covered with plaster. Substantial amounts of pottery were associated with these MH strata. Excavation of ELH levels continued in the NE excavation area (Fig. 2).  The remainder of the W wall of building D was uncovered, revealing that its S part had been robbed out over a distance of ca. 5m.  No floor deposits have yet been found inside building D, although the excavation is not finished.  The central interior area of building D had been converted into a monumental tomb during its last period of use, and possibly as early as LHIIB.  The tomb is rectangular (ca. 5m x 2m) with walls of mud-brick, and lined on the interior with large cut sandstone slabs, ca. 1m w. and 1.2m h.  One slab is preserved intact and fragments of several more were found in situ.  The tomb had been robbed in antiquity, but some human bones remained, as well as a gold ring, a fragmentary gold bracelet, a bronze ring, a piece of pierced gold foil and a small rock-crystal disk.  Possibly at this same time, the exterior walls of building D were rebuilt and widened.  The absence of interior faces is remarkable and may indicate that at this time the entire building was filled with debris and turned into a tumulus.  Building D was bordered by pebbled streets to the W and N.  No street was uncovered E of building D, but remnants were found of LHI, LHIIB and LHIIIA structures that apparently belonged to the same architectural complex as building D, but had much thinner walls.  Most of this complex lies outside the excavation area.  In the NE corner of the islet, a grave plot was uncovered with a monumental cist grave (grave 51), ca. 1.8m x 1.5m x 0.9m, built of roughly hewn large limestone slabs.  Parallel and perpendicular to this monumental grave were smaller cist graves. All graves of this plot had been robbed, but one cist tomb (grave 50) could be dated to LHI by a bichrome matt-painted amphoriskos contained within it (it also held a small bronze spiral).  Study of the pottery continues, but it is likely that all these graves are of ELH date.  Two more LHI cist tombs (graves 53 and 56) as well as an MHIII or LHI wall were found in trench LX784 at the E scarp of the islet.  Grave 56 belonged to a juvenile buried with an LHI Grey Minyan teacup, a spindle-whorl and an obsidian blade.  Fragments (perhaps not in situ) of a collapsed MHIII or LHI kiln were found, representing the latest BA occupation in that location. In trench LR770 in the E-central area of the islet, 2 substantial parallel stone walls bordered a 2m w. earth and pebble street.  This street runs parallel to that on the N side of building D, ca. 65m further N, and appears to be part of the same orthogonal street pattern.  The 2 walls date at least to LHIIB, but may have been constructed earlier.  On the latest surface of the street, in a mixed LH/PGeo context, was a small clay figurine of a parturient squatting female, which appears to be of non-local origin (Fig. 3).  In the NW excavation area, only one trench was opened (LG790), connecting 2 previously excavated trenches.  Here walls and surfaces belonged to the same 2 successive LHI occupation levels found in the adjacent trenches in previous years.  An earlier cist tomb (grave 72) of a child buried with a Grey Minyan amphoriskos of LHI or MH date was also found.  On top of the LHI strata were successive LHIIA and LHIIB levels, including a few walls and a substantial LHIIB burned destruction level with broken pottery and several animal horns.  To the NW, these strata were much disturbed, and the stratigraphy of the adjacent trench LF790 will remain unclear until further study is undertaken. Palatial period occupation (LHIIIA2 L and LHIIIB) remains scarce at Mitrou.  No new architectural remains dating to this period have been found in the E of the islet.  In trench LG790 in the NW excavation area, limited architecture was revealed. One wall (no. 64) was reused, and perhaps a small curved enclosure wall (no. 65) abutting it was built at this time.  A largely intact LHIIIA phi-figurine was found in a disturbed context.  In the same unit was a steatite lentoid seal stone modified into a bead, which is not closely datable.  A large LHIIIB2 L pottery dump was found against the S scarp of trench LP782, SE of building D. At the end of LHIIIB or the beginning of LHIIIC, 2 new walls (nos 119, 120) were constructed in trench LG790 and a new surface laid.  On this surface a bronze knife was found. In addition, the 2 palatial period walls continued in use. Contrary to previous reports, these are the first securely dated post-palatial architectural remains found thus far in the NW excavation area.  They establish for the first time that the post-palatial settlement reached this far W.  In the NE excavation area, the latest surface of the pebbled street W of building D dates to LHIIIC.  Thus the mass of large roughly cut blocks found on top of it and blocking this street must have fallen there in LHIIIC, and not during the LHIIIA2 E destruction, as  previously conjectured.  It is not yet clear from which building these large blocks came.  More excavation and study is needed in order to reconstruct the architectural history of this area.  Inside building B (the LHIIIC successor to building D), one or two LHIIIC L surfaces were uncovered as well as fragmentary walls (nos 40, 41, 116) of a small structure (building J) that must postdate building B and probably also building C.  The remains of a largely destroyed cist grave were found on top of the monumental tomb, and can be plausibly associated with an LHIIIC L clay feeding bottle.  At least 2 cist graves (nos 70 and 71) found E of building D may date to LHIIIC L or EPGeo.  Cist 70 included a handmade miniature dipper cup similar in style to the miniature vases of building C.  A 3rd cist grave (no. 69) in this area is datable to the SubMyc or EPGeo period by an intact cup on top of its capstone.  Burial 52 S of building B, excavated in 2007, can now be dated to LHIIIC. One new PGeo structure was uncovered.  Building I is a small rectilinear structure with thin walls just S of building E. Because of its close proximity to building E, it probably also dates to LPGeo.  Below the apse of building A was a rough semicircular platform, possibly a hearth and probably LHIIIC or PGeo in date, on top of which was a steatite seal stone of the Mainland Popular Group (Fig. 4).  Nearby were a miniature stone axe, a spindle-whorl and possibly a clay spool.  In addition, the walls of trench LR770 in the E-central area of the islet may have been reused at this time.  Several new PGeo cist graves were uncovered in many locations just below the plough zone, including at the E sea scarp, although not in trench LR797 in the NE corner of the islet.  Most of these tombs had been robbed.  Cist 57 W of building I contained a miniature patterned amphoriskos or amphoroid krater, and cist 49 in trench LX784 at the E scarp a fragmentary obsidian blade.  Cists 59 and 63 in trench LR770 in the E-central area are of MPGeo or LPGeo date.  Each contained a baby skeleton but no finds.  By far the richest finds were found in the LPGeo cist grave 62 in trench LG790 in the NW excavation area.  The tomb belonged to a ca. 6-year-old child buried with 3 small clay cups, a juglet, a feeding bottle and a pyxis, as well as 2 bronze pins, one or more bronze earrings, a bronze bracelet, a bronze ring, an indeterminate piece of bronze jewellery and a bead.

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Exarchos. S. Voyatzis and V. Sythiakaki present an architectural study of the Church of Ag. Nikolaos, which is dated to the end of the 12th or E13thCt AD, with the original wall-painting decoration dated to the last quarter of the 13thCt.

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À Dilesi, achèvement en 2006 de la fouille d’un ensemble de fours à amphores datant de l’époque romaine tardive.

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Les fouilles qui ont été effectuées à Palamari entre 2000 et 2007, dans le cadre d’un programme de restauration et d’aménagement du site qui s’est achevé en 2008, ont principalement porté sur le rempart de l’habitat, dont on estime l’utilisation entre l’Âge du Bronze Ancien II et le Bronze Moyen. Constitué de deux segments importants, un Nord-Ouest et un Sud, renfermant un espace de 17 ares, le rempart est pourvu de  bastions en fer à cheval, d’une tranchée et d’un proteichisma en avant du segment Nord-Ouest. Il correspond au même type que celui de Chalandriani, sur le site de Kastri à Syros, daté de la fin du Bronze Ancien II. Les fouilles à divers endroits ont fait apparaître une stratigraphie complète et tous les réaménagements et remaniements sont repérables, particulièrement au niveau des bastions. Un sondage entre les bastions H et Z a livré une série de pièces à absides construites antérieurement au rempart : elles fournissent ainsi un terminus post quem pour sa construction et livrent des informations sur la première phase d’occupation du site (PALAMARI I).

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Au Sud de l’Eubée, en Karystie, Ph. Mauridis et Z. Tankosic (Éphorie de Paléoanthropologie et de Spéléologie et Southern Euboean Exploration Project, Canadian Institute in Greece) ont poursuivi en 2008 les recherches dans la grotte d’Aghia Triada, au pied du Mont Ochi. Six nouveaux sondages ont été ouverts dans le couloir d’accès et dans un petit couloir adjacent à l’Est, formant une petite salle. Trois d’entre eux ont livré des résultats signifiants : Le sondage 3, ouvert dans la continuité du sondage 2 de 2007, a livré une couche superficielle comportant des tessons du Néolithique, du Bronze Ancien, ainsi que de l’époque romaine. Sous cette couche, on a dégagé des niveaux préhistoriques : la couche 3 a livré de la céramique caractéristique de la civilisation Attique-Kephalas, en relation avec des fosses et des sols, dont l’un était constitué de pierres plates et de terre compacte. À des niveaux inférieurs et notamment dans des fosses, on a recueilli de la céramique du Néolithique Récent I. Deux sondages ont été ouverts dans la petite salle orientale, où le plafond est très bas et le sol recouvert par endroit d’une croute stalagmitique. Un premier niveau a livré des ossements humains et animaux avec un peu de mobilier daté du Bronze Ancien II. La couche immédiatement inférieure comportait exclusivement des graines carbonisées, tandis que sous une couche de sable stérile, une nouvelle couche comportait des outils en pierre taillée, en pierre polie, en os et quelques bijoux. La céramique qui y a été trouvée date du Néolithique Récent II.

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Dans le golfe d’Eubée, près de l’îlot de Kavalliani, G. Koutsouflakis et X. Argyri (Éphorie des antiquités sous-marine) rendent compte de la découverte, en 2008, d’une épave contenant une cargaison de coupes et de plats vernissés de l’époque byzantine, à une profondeur de 12 à 20 m. Les vases qui ont été remontés à la surface portent un décor incisé de type Late Sgraffito Ware, représentant des oiseaux, des poissons, des quadrupèdes, ainsi que des motifs abstraits. La cargaison peut être datée des XIIe-XIIIe s. apr. J.-C.

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Dans le golfe d’Eubée, au Nord-Est de l’îlot de Kavalliani, près de l’îlot de Dimakos, G. Koutsouflakis et X. Argyri (Éphorie des antiquités sous-marine) rendent compte de la découverte, en 2008, d’une épave contenant une cargaison d’amphores de l’époque romaine, gisant à une profondeur de 17 à 28 m. On distingue quatre types d’amphores au moins, toutes d’origine Nord-Africaine (Africaine I et IIb, Keay LXII et Tripolitanian I) qui suggèrent, avec réserve, une datation de l’épave au IIe s. apr. J.-C.

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Sur l’acropole d’Hypati, G. Kakavas et A. Yphanti (24e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) rendent compte des travaux de nettoyages préalables aux restaurations de la forteresse médiévale en 2008, dont étaient visibles jusqu’à présent une tour circulaire, le rempart oriental, une partie du rempart Nord et les fondations de deux constructions. Les nettoyages dans le secteur de l’acropole ont permis la mise  au jour plusieurs nouveaux éléments : - Près de la chapelle d’Aï-Gianni, un segment du diateichisma de la forteresse (long. 22m ; larg. 0,90 ; haut. 2,70 m), constitué de deux parements d’appareil de pierres grossièrement taillées, de dimensions variables, liées avec du mortier. Le blocage entre les deux parements était fait de moellons. Ce type de maçonnerie est observé sur la majeure partie des vestiges des remparts de la forteresse et date de l’époque médiobyzantine. - Un deuxième diateichisma longe la partie intérieure de la colline. Il est composé de deux pans formant un angle droit, sur une longueur totale de 280 m. Des cavités carrées pour des poutres ont été observées à intervalle régulier sur l’élévation du mur, tandis que d’autres cavités inclinées sont liées à l’aménagement de canalisations. Dans l’élévation du mur, on observe plusieurs remplois, dont notamment un chapiteau en marbre de l’époque protobyzantine. - Sur les pentes Sud, plusieurs segments de murs de la fortification ont été localisés, ainsi qu’un autre segment de diateichisma au Sud-Ouest de l’acropole. - À l’extrémité Ouest de l’acropole d’Hypati, les fouilles ont livré une tour circulaire fondée directement sur le rocher, dont on distingue deux états de construction. Le rempart Nord (long. 41 m ; larg. 1,40 m) est bien conservé jusqu’à une hauteur de 0,60 m. Son angle Nord-Ouest a été entièrement détruit. Seule l’assise inférieure de ses fondations est conservée, tandis que l’angle Nord-Est est constitué de cinq assises de blocs de taille, en appareil isodome irrégulier. Il  appartient probablement à une partie du rempart antique qui a été compris dans la fortification byzantine de l’acropole. La fouille a révélé qu’une grande partie du rempart qui était visible dans la partie orientale de l’acropole est divisé en deux parties qui forment un angle droit, l’une en direction du Sud, l’autre vers le Sud-Est, suivant le bord de la falaise. - Sur la partie Nord-Est du rempart, le dégagement d’un pierrier a révélé la présence de la porte de l’acropole (larg. 1,95 m), dont le seuil monolithique a été trouvé en place. - Au Sud-Est de l’acropole, on a fouillé une construction presque carrée, dont deux murs sont conservés, l’un en appareil de pierres, l’autre en brique, fondés au bord d’un creusement dans la roche dont les parois étaient revêtues de mortier hydraulique. La structure a été identifiée à une tour à la base de laquelle se trouve une citerne (prof. max. fouillée 3,20 m).

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AVERTISSEMENT
La Chronique des fouilles en ligne ne constitue en aucun cas une publication des découvertes qui y sont signalées.
L'EfA et la BSA ne peuvent délivrer de copie des illustrations qui y sont reproduites et dont ils ne détiennent pas les droits.