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Dernières notices ajoutées par région : Macédoine Centrale
L’étude du squelette d’un homme, dont la tombe a été trouvée dans la pièce 12 du bâtiment hellénistique, a révélé que sa mort a été causée par un projectile qui lui a transpercé le thorax ; ce projectile était très probablement un oxybelos lancé par une catapulte.

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Étude muséologique de l’espace d’exposition construit en sous-sol du monument. 

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Arnissa (Ostrovo). S. Zacharidis, F. Karagianni and G. Skiadaresis report systematic documentation of the remains of an Ot bath (hammam) on the NE shore of Lake Vegoritis, close to Arnissa, at a site formerly known as Ostrovo (prominent in M and LByz sources). The bath lies under an abandoned mod. house which severely damaged its structure: nonetheless, a full plan and architectural study is presented. It was likely built at the end of the 15th or E16th Ct AD and continued in use until the rising lake flooded the Ot settlement in the 1st half of the 19th Ct.

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Loutraki (Aridaia). E. Kabouroglou, D. Bouzas and T. Chatzitheodorou (EPSVE) present a final report on palaeontological and sedimentological research in cave A (see also AR 53 [2006−2007], 58). Dating evidence is discussed in detail. The presence of Ursus Spelaeus from ca. 14,000 bp is indicated in the bone record. Sporadic human use is indicated from the Neo period (ca. 5,200 BC), with hearths and a very few artefacts, although this was interrupted when an earthquake blocked the entrance. Limited sedimentation and a little pottery indicate later sporadic use.

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Edessa. A. Chrysostomou (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on work undertaken in 2005−2006 to conserve and better present the archaeological site. This included excavation down to stereo in areas 1 and 2, beside the main street. Five new pits for storage pithoi are added to the previous record in these areas and date to the earlier phases of habitation, as do walls I and III in area 1 and I−III in area 2. In both areas, wall I continues E into the area of the stoa, indicating that the building line in the earlier periods lay near the W edge of the main street. An iron lamp was discovered near the floor of the last phase in area 2. Trial trenches in the stoas and the main street yielded a LRom marble relief of the Dioskouroi from the W stoa, and, from the E stoa, 5 inscribed lead strips.

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Edessa, S bypass.  A. Chrysostomou (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of 3 farmsteads on the plain S of the anc. city during rescue excavation preparatory to the construction of the bypass. Farmsteads 1 and 2 lie on the E of the plain and farmstead 3 on the W. At farmstead 1 (2km from anc. Edessa), limited habitation remains include a hearth with sherds of local storage vessels (pithoid shapes and amphoriskoi) and 4 loomweights scattered around it, and, to the S, a storage area with the remains of a large pithos and amphora sherds. The structure was roofed with Laconian tiles with red and black slip. Local and imported pottery includes a wide range of storage vessels, cooking vessels and tablewares, especially one-handled bowls and skyphoi, which date the earliest phase of habitation to EHel. A tpq for the last phase is provided by a Macedonian coin of the reigns of Philip V and Perseus. Farmstead 2, 2km N of farmstead 1 and 1.7km from Edessa, is a long, narrow building (rooms I−VI), with an approach road from Edessa entering at the NW and flanked by rooms VII−IX. The structure had a Laconian-tiled roof. Rooms I−VI produced few finds of Hel coins and pottery, along with loomweights with graffiti from rooms I and III (the former room containing a hearth and the latter the setting for a pithos). The majority of finds come from a courtyard S of rooms II−IV: these include a millstone and grinding stone, plus a wide range of storage vessels, cooking vessels and tablewares (notably Megarian bowls) which may have been discarded here, along with a few items of jewellery, glass beads and coins. A few ERom sherds, including a lead-glazed relief skyphos, also come from these rooms. A few 3rd Ct BC bg sherds may come from an isolated pit grave sunk into the natural soil in room VI (a room later used for storage). The latest use of the farmstead is established by a coin of Antoninus in room IX and LRom sherds in room VIII. Farmstead 3, 2.7km SW of anc. Edessa, consists of 2 long, narrow buildings (14.7m x 3.7m and 10.9m x 2.3m) in a poor state of preservation. A Rom date is indicated by the surviving pottery. Excavation continued in 2007 just N of the farmsteads noted above, where a further ECh farmstead was investigated by the 11th EBA. Eight single burials were found in rock-cut cist tombs with cover slabs, dating from the ECl−EHel. Female burials contained vases and jewellery, whereas males had weapons (2 spearheads are illustrated), agricultural tools and vases linked to the symposium. The tombs lie close to the anc. road from Edessa to Imathia, which passed through the valley of Platani-Flamouria.

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Giannitsa. S. Zacharidis, F. Karagianni and G. Skiadaresis report  the discovery of an Ot bath (hammam) in rescue excavation at 32 Venizelou street. Part of the apodyterion was preserved on this plot, with the rest of the bath continuing into neighbouring plots. The base of a perirrhanterion was found in the S of the plot, in what was probably the centre of the room, along with 2 water channels. Niches in the E and N wall were likely for bathers’ possessions. Stratigraphy and portable finds (including glazed pottery and many clay pipes) indicate that the bath was in use from the 15th−17th Ct AD, when it was destroyed by fire. It is identified as the bath of Achmet Bei mentioned by Evliya Çelebi on his visit to Giannitsa in 1668.

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Archontiko W cemetery.  A. and P. Chrysostomou (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) report continuing excavation focused on the W slope of hill 69. Ninety-nine further tombs were excavated (35 EIA, 49 Ar and 15 Cl−EHel), plus an Ar dog burial, bringing the total discovered to 787 in an area of 0.8 ha and confirming a peak of wealth in the Ar period. Graves were arranged in family groups with pathways between them. EIA graves, mostly pits with or without cover slabs (plus some cists), contained single inhumations in extended position. 19 had no goods: the remainder mostly had pottery, with other items (iron knives, gold and bronze jewellery, and biconical clay spindle-whorls) being less common. Female burials were distinguished by jewellery and spindle whorls, but no particular items were characteristic of males or children. Among female burials, details are given of 4 adult burials and one child burial, all with 1−2 pots and 1−4 items of jewellery (mostly bronze with a little gold), plus shells and a spindle-whorl in individual cases. Among the 49 Ar graves (last quarter of the 6th Ct−480), of which 9 were robbed to some extent, 20 are male burials, 23 female and 6 not attributable. The dead were interred in extended, prone position, in wooden coffins: women’s heads were usually to the E (occasionally to the N or S, but never W), while men’s were usually to the W (occasionally to the N or S, but never E). Male graves contained mostly metalware, which allowed the distinction of classes of warrior as follows (noting also the report by A. and P. Chrysostomou of the 2006−2007 excavations in Eleutherotypia 06/03/2008). (1) Ten burials with iron spears, arrowheads, knives and a few other items of jewellery and pottery vessels (3 adult and 3 juvenile cases are presented in detail). (2) Six burials with an iron sword, 2 spearheads and a knife, plus a large number of other items such as pottery vessels (including Attic and Cor imports), a few terracotta figurines and bronze phialai, miniature iron furniture and jewellery, mainly bronze and iron rings and pins, and gold mouth-plates (3 cases are described in detail). (3) Tombs with all these items in greater quantity, plus a helmet (one also had a gold wreath and several also gold eye pieces). Tomb 546 (last quarter of the 6th Ct), for example, contained a bronze helmet, iron sword, 2 spearheads and a knife, a gold mouth-plate with repoussé decoration, a gold ring and 2 iron double pins, 3 iron curved objects, a bronze lebes and phiale, and 4 pottery vessels (2 local, a Cor exaleiptron and an Attic bf kylix). In tomb 587 (M6th Ct), partially robbed in the head area, surviving goods comprised a bronze helmet, iron sword, 2 spearheads and 3 iron knives, a gold mouth-plate with repoussé decoration, a ring, 2 rosettes and 11 mostly triangular sections of gold sheet decoration from a leather corselet and garments, miniature furniture and obeloi in iron, an iron hook, a bronze lebes and 2 phialai, 4 terracotta figurines and 4 vases (one local, 2 Attic and one Cor). Among the women’s graves, 6 examples (4 adult and 2 child) are described in detail. All contain large quantities of gold and bronze jewellery and ornaments (mouth-plates, rosettes, as well as necklaces, pins, rings and earrings), vases (local, with a few Cor and Ionian imports) and, in certain cases, also terracotta figurines, iron knives, miniature furniture). In the context of discussion of Ar grave goods, one should also note the report in Eleutherotypia (06/03/2008), which focuses on the rich gold jewellery found especially in Ar graves (cf AR 50 [2003−2004], 44). As this indicates, by the end of the 2006−2007 excavation season, the overall total of tombs had reached 872 (227 EIA, 409 Ar, 229 Cl−EHel and 7 undated). In addition to gold dress ornaments and diadems, 3 cases of women wearing gold face masks are noted (with illustration). Impressed decoration included in one case, 4-pointed sun/stars over the eyes with omphaloi below and, on the rhomboid mouth cover, a winged animal in the middle, dolphins above and below, and an Ionian wave motif at the corners. The report reiterates the division of male burials into warrior classes, but notes a 4th class of exceptionally rich warriors with a full panoply of offensive and defensive weapons (shield, helmet, one or more swords, spearheads and knives) of whom 5 had gold face masks and silvered bronze shields and 2 others bronze shields. A number of warriors wore a type of Illyrian-Cor helmet decorated with gold bands and engraved decoration which is likely to come from the royal workshop. Returning to the 2006 report, the 15 Cl−Hel pit tombs comprise 5 male and 8 female burials, plus 2 too disturbed to assign. Until the start of the 4th Ct, the orientation of the body followed Ar practice, but thereafter, women’s heads were consistently turned to the W and men’s to the E. Grave goods usually comprise one or more coins (of Macedon or the Thessalian cities) and at least one or 2 vases (amphorae, skyphoi, bolsals or lamps) among other items. Three male graves had iron spearheads and 5 others, silver, bronze and iron rings. Three tombs of the first phase of this period are described in detail. Thus, for example, a tomb of a small girl (grave 590, M5th Ct) contained a gold necklace, a pair of silver earrings, 4 silver bow fibulae with iron pins, an Attic type A skyphos and a composite ritual vessel. Two male graves each contained one vase, 2 iron spearheads and 2 items of jewellery (in each case a bronze ring with stamped decoration, showing the first part of Aesop’s fable of the fox and the stork and a maenad respectively) − in addition, one had a coin. Four representative examples from the latter part of the period (2 male and 2 female) are discussed, showing a similar range of goods.

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Pella. M. Lilibaki-Akamati (Director, ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on site conservation and rescue excavation prior to the construction of a bypass around the site. The exact positions of the E and W city walls were determined, thus estimating the E−W w. of the city at 1,280m along the road near the Sanctuary of Darron and 1,320m S of the agora. Parts of 3 insulae and the roads separating them were investigated in the W sector: these include 2 of the westernmost insulae on the limits of the urban plan (noting that in the one fully preserved case, the w. E−W is narrowed from the usual 49m to 29m). A 7m w. road separates the outer insulae from the W city wall. At least 3 construction phases are identified: in the final phase of the SW insula, pottery kilns were installed. The walls of the N insula were robbed for the construction of tombs and periboloi in the Rom E cemetery, which extends into this area. Twelve Rom tombs (2nd half of the 2nd−1st half of the 3rd Ct AD) were investigated here − 9 tile graves, 2 cists with cover slabs and a pit. These all contained 1−2 pottery vessels, glass vessel fragments and 1−3 bronze coins, and, in 2 cases, gold, silver and bronze jewellery. Further graves from this cemetery, as well as Hel graves (including 6 looted chamber tombs, all beginning ca. 75m from the known limit of the urban area), were excavated in the N part of this area. In the S city, remains of 3 ECh (1st−4th Ct AD) buildings were located in an area ca. 520m l. on the city’s E−W axis. These demonstrate that the lines of the urban plan continued to be followed even after the widespread abandonment of the settlement following the earthquake of 90 BC. They include a Rom bath preserving the praefurnium, a caldarium complex of 3 rooms with hypocausts and a one-room tepidarium leading into a small pool. An outdoor swimming pool, with a water supply and drainage system and a small exedra, lay to the S and there was a cistern to the W. The bath buildings had mosaic floors and opus sectile decoration with coloured mortars: portable finds include clay, glass and marble vessels and many coins. Tests beneath the bath complex revealed many phases of occupation extending back into the Cl period. Cl and Hel remains were levelled, likely in the 2nd half of the 1st or the 1st half of the 2nd Ct AD, for the new buildings, which followed the former urban plan. These were subsequently destroyed by fire, and new buildings, including the bath complex, erected in the 2nd−3rd Ct: these were in turn destroyed in the 1st half of the 4th Ct AD, and the building materials used for the construction of roads in this area. To date, no remains of the Ch period have been located elsewhere and it is likely that activity was confined to the S part o  the city, close to the water-front. I. Akamatis reports on a further season of excavation in the agora. Excavation in the S part of the E stoa was undertaken to assist in wall conservation, verify the floor levels and install a drainage system. In the lowest floor level, a series of storage pits relates to the initial use of the rooms: one produced pottery and sherds of pseudo-Cypriot amphorae, giving a tpq of the L4th Ct BC for the construction and first use of the stoa. Pits in several rooms produced large quantities of figurines and figurine moulds. Lifting of part of the fabric of the road E of the agora, N and S of the central avenue, revealed part of the E wall of the agora, and the foundation trench and part of the wall of the insula to the E. The NE corner of the E stoa was located in situ, along with the corner of the neighbouring insula to the E. N of the avenue, previously located insula remains were cleaned and the angle of the next insula to the N revealed. Investigation of the road bordering the S edge of the agora continued. The road fabric included many metal items (keys, lead weights, etc., plus many craft tools) and a wide range of stamped amphora handles, including a large number of the Parmeniskos group. Pottery included much rf and sherds bearing graffiti, and there were also many moulds for figurines and relief altars, as well as elements of a roof, coins and a marble head of Herakles. The stratigraphy of a section of road between insula I/4 and the S stoa was investigated: this was shown to lie over part of a cemetery of the 1st half of the 4th Ct BC previously located in the area. 23 additional tombs and a pyre were found in the W part of the road (2 enchytrismoi, 5 tile-covered graves and 16 rock-cut pits), likely covered by tumuli. Grave goods were generally few: squat lekythoi, bolsals, skyphoi, oinochoai, olpai and thilastra, rf vessels (especially lekythoi and pelikai), figurines, bronze, iron and silver fibulae, and jewellery placed at the relevant part of the body. By the hands of many men were farming tools, weapons and athletic equipment. In the S part of the previously excavated cemetery, within the road, was a well filled in the L3rd or E2nd Ct BC; this likely served the buildings in the area rather than the earlier cemetery. In the area of the road S of the agora, N of insulae I/2 and I/7, lay a metalworking establishment, with tools, moulds, hearths and other related equipment. Finally, 2 stretches of road, through the S stoa and the SW approach to the agora, were investigated. Preparatory research towards the public presentation of the archaeological site of Pella is discussed by I. Akamatis. Significant progress is reported in documenting the road network and water system, and locating further insulae. Nine further graves excavated along the main routes had been badly damaged by road construction: many were in slim pithoi and were likely marked with tumuli. The only offerings were a local EBA open vessel and an ECyc marble bowl. A fountain house was discovered by the road from the museum to the storerooms. P. Chrysostomou (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on Hel and Rom graves discovered in rescue excavation in the W cemetery.  A section of the new bypass road 250m l. and 22.5m w. produced: part of the Hel W city wall and the road dividing it from the outermost insulae; part of the proteichisma; further W, the SW edge of a LBA settlement (fills, deposits and a well containing pottery, stone tools and animal bone); part of a water channel with clay pipes (post-dating 168 BC) along the line of the new road. Part of an extensive cemetery, with 429 graves (39 Hel and 390 Rom), was traced along the length of the new road, inside and outside the wall and proteichisma, and for some distance further W. This remained in use from the L4th Ct BC to the 1st quarter of the 4th Ct AD. One tile grave contained a horse burial. The 39 Hel burials were scattered in front of the proteichisma growing denser further W. They were intact, although with modest goods, and consist of enchytrismoi (3), pits (10), tile graves (19) and rock-cut chamber tombs (7). Illustrative of the enchytrismoi is grave 243A (pre-M3rd Ct), a male cremation in a kalpis covered with a plate, outside which were 2 pottery tear-bottles and 3 iron strigils on a ring (2 bear a particular producer’s stamp on the handle which appears elsewhere in the cemetery). Ten pit graves, mainly with child cremations, were found in the W part of the excavation. Among those described, grave 8 is a typical example. This contained a large number of astragaloi and terracotta figurines (notably Attis types and Macedonian youths), plus a tear-bottle. Pit grave 20 (a child cremation with a lead weight) had as a cover slab the reused 3rd Ct BC grave stele of Aristokleia, wife of Chairephanis. The 19 tile graves contained both cremations and inhumations, with metal and ceramic offerings. For example, tile grave 106 (cremation of a young girl) contained a silver ring with gold bezel, silver hoop earrings and a bg pyxis (1st half of the 2nd Ct BC). Grave 266 (a female cremation, with iron nails preserved from the bier) had a bronze needle, 2 small iron hooks, a bg skyphos, a loomweight and 2 coins. Immediately W and outside the proteichisma was a rock-cut chamber tomb, with a simple chamber to the W and the stomion blocked with small stones. It contained a male inhumation on a bier, with 5 pottery vessels dating just before the M3rd Ct BC. Chamber tomb 1 is roughly similar; here a lead pyxis and 7 pottery vessels escaped the looters. Chamber tomb 5 is more elaborate: it had a long dromos and an entrance way which was originally blocked. The chamber held one inhumation damaged by the intrusion of a 3rd Ct AD tomb: a cutting in the E wall of the dromos held a cremation with 3 vessels of the M2nd Ct BC. The 4 remaining rock-cut tombs were low, underground chambers (2 with single chambers, 2 with double), all with individual internal arrangements. The single-chambered tomb 4 had a stepped dromos: an inhumation in a rectangular niche on the E side of the dromos was originally protected by a wall. Pottery, lamps and figurines were scattered through the dromos fill. The chamber had couches on the W and N sides, a low wall demarcating a cist grave and 2 rectangular containers on the E side. Two niches in the S wall held lamps. Between 4 and 6 members of the same family were buried in this tomb, laid on wooden biersand with metal objects (bronze chest fittings, a gilded bronze  mirror) along with ceramic vessels and figurines of the 2nd Ct BC. The rock-cut chamber tombs and their contents, all 2nd Ct BC, are described in detail. Tomb 6 is the most elaborate structure, preserving in its first chamber painted plaster with architectural decoration and, in its 2nd, an Ionic doorway with painted plaster ornament. The Rom cemetery in the area of the Hel W cemetery served the Rom−ECh settlement in the S part of the earlier city and at Fakos, rather than the Rom colonial settlement 1.5km W. 390 Rom graves (including 7 cists, 31 pits and 346 tile graves) lay within the Hel city and further W beyond the walls. 246 contained goods. Graves were arranged in family groups with no consistent orientation: around one third (128) were child burials, and all infant and most child burials lacked goods, although some contained objects such as figurines, glass and ceramic vessels. There were 222 cremations and 168 inhumations. Most (but not all) cremations were primary. Cremation was the dominant rite from the Augustan era until the end of the 1st Ct AD, the 2 rites then co-existed during the 1st half of the 2nd Ct and finally inhumation dominated during the 2nd half of the 2nd−M3rd Ct. Almost all graves were intact, but only a very few contained valuable goods. A wide variety of ceramic shapes is represented, with oinochoai, amphorae, chytrae, cups, skyphoi, plates, trays, lekanides, tear-bottles and lamps most common. Many are plainwares: Latin and Gr workshop stamps are rare. Relief lamps are relatively common, including Ephesian types. Glass vessels are also common, but metal offerings are rare. Terracotta figurines are mostly found in child graves. Gold funerary coins were very rare; most  were bronze, or occasionally silver, denarii. Coin hoards are also rare, excepting certain examples of the 1st half of the 3rd Ct AD when the custom was widespread in Macedonia. A number of tombs are distinguished by the presence of jewellery in gold, silver, bronze, iron, glass, jet and bone. Three prophylactic amulets are of particular interest. Common finds in female burials are iron and bronze fittings from wooden chests, pyxides in bronze and bone, cosmetic palettes and tools, mirrors, needles, bronze bells, bone buttons, and terracotta and bone spindle-whorls. Less common finds are bronze and iron strigils, bronze medical implements, pendants and toys. Bronze handles from biers or couches, and nails from biers on which bodies rested for cremation, are also noted. Only 2 marble grave markers were recovered: one had a seated man at left and a rider at right, the other, in secondary use as a cist tomb cover, depicted a mounted hero hunting a boar to right, toward an altar with a standing male and a tree round which was a snake. There is one unique case of an in situ limestone base for a marble funerary altar, the upper part of which (a marble pinecone) was found nearby. Part of an ERom honorific marble base bears a fragmentary inscription. Among the enchytrismoi, grave 206A is described: this is an infant cremation in a kalpis, with a bronze coin, a ceramic tearbottle and 2 figurines. The 7 cist tombs show great variety in construction. Tomb 21, a male inhumation in a large cist lined with marble slabs, may be the grave of a city official. It contained a relief lamp, a  iron prochous, a bronze strigil with engraved decoration, a denarius of Caracalla (198 AD), a necklace of 2 silver coin  and a gold ring on a chain, and rolled gold sheet inscribed with the owner’s name, Pontios Lykos, on all 4 sides. The pit graves showed great variety: 18 were simple pits and 21 had cover slabs or tiles, 26 held inhumations and 5 cremations. Among the 4 typical examples described, grave 22 (dated to the 2nd half of the 2nd Ct AD by 2 coins) held gold earrings, a silver bracelet, a bronze button, a glass vessel, a ceramic chytra and a terracotta horse and rider. One of its cover slabs, reused from a funerary monument, bore an inscription recording that Zosimos built for his fellow slave (synkellarios) the monument of Ingenua, slave of Veratius Camerinus. Tile graves were the most common category: those inside the walls were deep and tightly arranged in family groups. W of the proteichisma many tombs were set inside a wide cutting in the rock. Pit and cist graves were often bordered on 2 or more sides with stones and/or tile and many had periboloi built from rocks and (mainly Hel) spolia. Some tile graves had sections of terracotta pipe set upright to receive libations. Grave goods (mostly terracotta figurines, lamps and vessels placed upside down) were often outside the tomb, indicating feasts and offerings for the dead. 33 examples are discussed in detail. Among these, we note tile grave 18 (a male inhumation) which contained one glass and 5 ceramic vessels, bronze fishhooks, a medical implement, a bronze sealing ring depicting a sphinx and an amulet in a gold setting. The oval semi-precious stone in this amulet was engraved on one face with an Egyptian mystical formula in Gr and a magic symbol in the centre, and on the other face with a coiled lion-headed snake identified by the inscription as Cnouphis (amulets with this image protect against stomach conditions). Goods in grave 47 included a hoard of 17 bronze coins and a gold ring worn by the young male deceased inscribed ΕΙΣ ΖΕΥΣ ΣΕΡΑΠΙΣ, further evidence of this cult at Pella.

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Trilofos (Kazani). I. Graikos (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a LNeo settlement in rescue excavation for the construction of the new Veroia-Skydra road, at the site of Kazani. The site lies within an arc of settlement along the foothills of Mt Vermion. The extent of the site and the nature of its internal organization remain unclear (the area is disturbed by mod. quarrying and cultivation). It may be as large as 0.5ha, but excavation could cover only ca. 800m2. A stone-paved, likely open-air area, a vaulted channel, pits, oval stone structures, hearths and storage jars were located. Pottery finds include many open angular pots with flat bases, notably black-burnished and black-rimmed pots, with few examples of red-topped and other burnished wares. Other finds are few: they include stone tools, 3 clay figurines and a stone bead.

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Veroia. I. Graikos (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of 2 clusters of graves dating from the L5th−L4th Ct BC during road-works at the S entrance of the anc. city. The older (L5th−M4th Ct) contains 10 pit graves and the later (M−L4th Ct) 11.  All but one had wooden covers and all contained individual burials. The earlier group was oriented N−S and the later E−W. Pottery from the earlier group, notably bg skyphoi and exaleiptra, is closely related to Attic, whereas that from the later is closer to Hel. An individual burial of the M2nd Ct BC reused an earlier pit. The article assembles evidence for the topography of the cemeteries of Veroia (cf. AR 28 [1981−1982], 39−40 for previous finds in this area).

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Promithea Veroias. E. Psarra and S. Lioulias (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on rescue excavation on the Savvas plot at 4 Aivaliou street (fig. 1). Four rooms from a Rom bath complex likely form part of a private establishment located outside the city boundaries, although the structure is too poorly preserved to be sure of its status. The walls include architectural spolia in secondary use. Along the E side of the plot lie the praefurnium and the hypocaust of the caldarium. To the W are 2 rooms with mosaic pavements depicting geometric patterns, room I (the northernmost) in mixed materials (pebbles, terracotta and other stones) and room II (the southernmost) in terracotta set in waterproof mortar. Room I is likely the apodyterium and room II likely a swimming pool. Ceramic evidence indicates use during the 2nd and 3rd Cts AD, with some architectural adaptation in the course of that period. Notable among finds is a lamp imitating a product of the 3rd Ct Attic workshop of ΕΛΠΙΔΗΦΟΡΟΥ. The complex was destroyed and abandoned in the M3rd Ct. Room II was reused as a store, containing pottery of the 1st half of the 5th Ct AD. A Cl child pit grave of the 3rd quarter of the 5th Ct BC was found between the N wall of the praefurnium and a water channel at the N edge of the plot. This contained a rf squat lekythos, a stone alabastron, a bg aryballoid lekythos with a sigma patterned band, a Rheneia cup, nails from the child’s bier and, at the feet, 2 bronze strigils and a terracotta figurine. At shoulder height were a glass alabastron, a lekythos of the workshop of the Megaira Painter and a glass trefoil-mouthed oinochoe. A silver coin of Alexander I served as Charon’s obol. In general, the bath complex is considered in the context of the hitherto limited (but growing) body of evidence for Hel and Rom activity NW of Veroia, outside the city boundaries. In addition to published evidence, a new Hel tomb at 43 Ambelokipon street (on the slopes of the hill of Profitis Ilias) is the most distant from the known Hel cemeteries yet discovered (ADelt B 59 [2004], forthcoming). At 7 Arygyropoulos street, part of a strong N−S wall of Hel date is reported (ADelt B 60 [2005], forthcoming).

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Dion. D. Pantermalis (Aristotelian University, Thessaloniki) reports on a further season of excavation and site conservation. Trial trenches S of the Temple of Asklepios revealed no building remains, just an isolated sarcophagus, the presence  of which is hard to explain. In the sector of the Hydraulis, excavation continued in the NW part of the insula. The stoa and stylobate (revealed in previous years) were traced along the entire W side of the insula, demonstrating that the cardo of the city was a colonnaded street. Immediately E, the presence of a rectangular room precludes a cross-street: this room was likely used for the preparation of lime. Rooms discovered in this area date to the 2nd−3rd Ct AD: a floor at a higher level dates to the 4th Ct AD, coinciding with evidence previously noted in the W part of the insula. In the agora, the stratigraphical sequence W of rooms 11−13 was examined, revealing 3 Rom phases above Hel walls (reported in full by S. Piniatoglou). A potter’s kiln in the NW part of the agora (discovered in 2001) was further investigated. This rectangular structure (3.7 x 3.5m) had 4 pairs of columns supporting the chamber; the exterior and chamber floor were finished in clay. Surrounding rooms were transformed into workshop space following the establishment of the kiln and the area probably served as a tile works − finished tiles, metal tools and masses of unbaked clay were found. The kiln was destroyed by fire and abandoned. The House of Athena, close to the Villa of Dionysos, was further investigated. Four stoas surrounded the courtyard with the impluvium, with 2 rectangular rooms off each: one room on the E side served as the tablinium. The entire complex was built in the same Rom phase, and subsequently abandoned after flooding and not reoccupied. Portable finds include (in addition to pottery) a marble table and 2 malachite sealstones: the house takes its name from a relief depicting Athena with a snake. Cleaning of the central N−S road revealed a paved cross-road running E; this then turns S, at the same elevation as the road in front of the Villa of Dionysos. The statue of Hera reported in AR 53 ([2006−2007], 67) as found built into a ECh wall, is discussed with illustration. S. Piniatoglou (Aristotelian University, Thessaloniki) reports on the completion of excavation in the Sanctuary of Asklepios. E of the temple, 2 rooms of an Imperial Rom stoa were revealed, founded upon a Hel construction. Fragments of marble statuary include a crouching boy characteristic of sanctuaries of Asklepios and related deities. Piniatoglou concludes with a summary of evidence for the Hel city.

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Thessaloniki, city centre E cemetery (area of). M. Tsibidou-Avloniti, A. Kagiouli, A. Kaifa and E. Christodoulidou (ΙΣτ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on continuing excavation in the new city hall plot (Demarchikon Megaron, Vas. Georgiou and 3rd September streets). 63 tombs, 5 wells, 12 pits and the remains of 2 buildings were concentrated in the NE and S of the plot: the remaining area was severely disturbed by mod. construction. Tombs were arranged in rows in the NE, SE and S-central areas: orientation varied, but the majority were NW−SE, with the cranium to the SE. There were 2 enchytrismoi, 15 tile graves, 4 uncovered cists, 37 cists covered with slabs, 2 marble box-cists and 3 stone-lined cists. Most were single burials, all inhumations, mainly in prone position (with 2 contracted). Five cases contain 2−3 members of the same family. There is one case of secondary use of a tomb (after an initial, Hel, cremation). Most graves had few or no goods. Coins from 9 graves date to the 1st half of the 3rd Ct AD, with one hoard of 6 bronze coins of Constantine I. Other goods include bronze earrings and rings, a pair of silver earrings and a few plainware pottery and glass vessels mostly placed at the foot of the deceased. Tile grave 6 (of a man and a woman) contained a clay mould, a pottery tear-bottle and cup, and 2 coins of Alexander Severus, making it one of the richest in the cemetery (along with tomb 5 which had a plain amphoriskos, and 2 − pottery and glass − tear-bottles of the M3rd Ct AD). Tomb 3 held a family (parents plus 2 infants and a small girl at their feet): the girl had a gold earring and there was also a glass amphoriskos and an E3rd Ct AD bronze coin. The tomb was covered with marble spolia in secondary use, including an Ionic capital and a funerary stele decorated with a relief of an athlete and rider: the inscription from the reuse records an offering by Claudia Byzantia for her house-slaves. Grave goods (notably coins) indicate the use of this part of the cemetery in the 1st half of the 3rd Ct AD. Earlier use (3rd and 2nd Cts BC) is indicated by tomb finds and pottery (including bg and W Slope) in the rubbish pits and the wells which probably supplied water for funerary rites and other such purposes. The wells were excavated down to the water table: all but one lay in the S area, close to the tomb groups. They varied in di. from 2−3.5m and contained plain pottery, architectural spolia, fragments of inscribed stele and a few coins. Well 4, the largest, also contained many murex shells. Well 5 probably relates to 2 later structures W of the S tomb group: the first is a cistern, lined with waterproof cement and with a floor of reused marble slabs and a central settling basin. 6m N was a rectangular structure beneath a thick destruction layer: this had a mosaic floor and white plastered walls. At 28−30 Perdikkas street, within the area of the E cemetery, part of a building complex was found which continues to the W beneath a mod. building. The NW−SE wall is best preserved (in opus mixtum, 1.1m thick, 15.3m l., up to 3.57m h.), with parts of the 2 angle walls: only the foundation courses of the paved floor survive. Five 1m2 stone piers projecting from the exterior of the long wall probably supported scaffolding for the construction of what was at least a 2-storey building (and the 2 side walls have one preserved on each). There are almost no portable finds, but the architecture suggests an ECh date. The previous discovery of funerary monuments in this area may indicate a similar purpose for this building too, perhaps as a mausoleum. In the course of rescue excavation in a plot on Oidipous street (in the Kifisias area, W of the Allatini tile works), part of a building complex was located, with 13 rooms preserved. This remained in use from the 4th Ct BC to the 2nd Ct AD. The N part of the complex was destroyed by large pits cut down into the rock during the 3rd Ct AD: these contained large amounts of domestic pottery, tile and stone slabs, as well as bones of large animals. Pit V also contained a large quantity of carbonized grain. Numismatic evidence dates the first construction phase to the reign of Philip II: this phase included most of the structures in the SE part of the plot (a series of rectangular rooms). Finds (amphorae and pithoi, plus bf and red glazed plates and skyphoi) indicate a storage function for this area. Millstones in other parts of the complex imply preparation of foodstuffs. A stone base at the W wall of room 6 probably supported a ladder. W of room 6 was a paved court dating to the first construction phase, which was raised and repaved soon afterwards. In phase 2 (Hel), strong protective walls were added (one, with external piers, indicating a 2nd storey). The complex was extended to the W, with the addition of room Z in the EHel period: finds from this room include roof tile, a loomweight and a gilded glass seal depicting an Amazon with her horse. In the neighbouring room, at the edge of the excavation area, a large pithos in situ, repaired with lead sheet, and a 1.2m2 clay hearth indicate food storage and preparation. In the 3rd, Rom, phase (1st−2nd Ct AD), existing rooms continued to be used, with some occasional additions. The area was cleaned in the M2nd Ct, depositing Hel and ERom pottery into the pits and the large storage pithos. The complex was destroyed (with widespread evidence of burning) and abandoned late in the 2nd Ct for reasons as yet unknown: hostilities may be indicated by 3 spearheads in an upper level. One block S of the previous excavation, at the junction of Eurygeni and Kanellopoulos streets, rescue excavation revealed part of a Rom bath covering ca. 20m2 and oriented E. Three tanks for individual use were found, heated by a hypocaust system and heat exchange via arched intercommunicating openings. Strong traces of burning in the chambers beneath the tubs indicate the proximity of the praefurnium and confirm the identification of the area of the complex discovered as the caldarium. The largest of these reservoirs was a rectangular room with an apse at the S end and its E side shaped into 2 rectangular individual tanks. On the bottom of the best preserved S tank, a layer of terracotta tiles preserves patches of the waterproof mortar for the marble floor: marble set in the same cement would also have decorated the wall. The other 2 tubs each preserved 9 square piers of the hypocaust on the underground chamber floor. A system of drainage channels and lead pipes removed foul water from the tank area. In the absence of many small finds, the complex is dated to the 4th Ct AD primarily by the existence of individual facilities. Extensive mod. construction in the area currently makes it impossible to trace the complex further. E. Marki (9th EBA) analyses the results of rescue excavation at Egnatias 57 and Bakatselou, where a complex was revealed showing 15 building and repair phases. Remains of a 12th−13th Ct AD potter’s workshop are noted. Attention is devoted to an ECh (6th Ct) public building: a room from this, 10.6 x 9.7m in size and with 2 entrances, had a marble floor and wall mosaics reminiscent of those in the Rotonda. Beneath this was a room with a 5th Ct mosaic floor. When this ECh structure was destroyed, the area became an open-air workshop, with 3 water channels and a metalworker’s furnace. Beneath the ECh structure was part of a large 4th Ct AD building: a room 10.7m x 5.3m was traced, with a courtyard to the N and an underground storage area with a vaulted roof beneath. In a 2nd phase, this building was extended N to include the courtyard (which then acquired a marble floor with opus sectile inlay) and the staircase leading underground was clad in marble, integrating the 2 floors into a grand complex for formal functions. Earlier use of the site is indicated by the discovery of 2 Imperial Rom walls beneath the LRom complex and by Hel pottery (the height of the water table here does not permit the excavation of earlier levels).

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Thessaloniki, E of centre, Kalamaria. M. Tsibidou-Avloniti, A. Kagiouli, K. Kaiafa, E. Lykidou, M. Mandaki and S. Protopsalti (ΙΣτ' ΕΠΚΑ) report  on rescue excavation at a number of sites in and neighbouring the deme of Kalamaria. At 21 Alex. Papagou street in Karabournaki, 4 cist graves and 5 rubbish pits immediately neighbouring the excavation site of Karabournaki were cleared. Only 2 graves contained goods: a probable male burial had a local 7th Ct BC red slip bowl and the 2nd burial had a prochous and phiale at the feet and a gold leaf--shape closing the mouth. The pits produced large quantities of plain and decorated, local and imported (Attic, Euboean and Cor) sherds of all the standard types from EIA−Ar. The water table was encountered at a d. of 4m; where possible, a final metre was dug under water. At 9 Papagou street were 13 smaller cist graves cut into the clay soil, again going below the water table: they vary greatly in shape from elliptical or round to completely uncanonical. All contained plain and/or painted EIA−Ar pottery: much sea shell was also collected, including murex. A series of building plots in the coastal zone on the NW edge of Kalamaria (bounded by Kath. Rossidou, Th. Sofouli, Paradimitriou and Kerasountos streets) provided evidence for large-scale harbour and warehouse installations. These were founded in the 1st quarter of the 4th Ct AD, developed through that Ct, and had a later building phase in the 1st half of the 6th Ct. At 4 Kouskoura street, 2 successive building complexes were located. The earlier had 3 rectangular rooms: 3 pit burials of children lay along the outside face of the exterior wall. A further 3 tombs in the NE corner, marked with tiles, produced very few goods (2 unreadable coins and a bronze ring). Part of a road paved with stone slabs interspersed with tile, and bedded on a layer of tile and small stones, was found in the NW corner of the excavation area and should be associated with this complex. The 2nd, slightly later, complex had 2 rooms, one of which had a white plaster floor and a basement: its continuation (Kath. Rossidou 4) was poorly preserved. Finds consisted of plainwares, lamps, glass vessels, a large quantity of shell and small metal items (e.g., a 4th Ct AD cross-bow fibula characteristic of the dress of a male official). 66 bronze coins date the complex to the reigns of Theodosius I and Arcadius. On the last plot, 2 building complexes were found, the earlier of which covered the W and S sides of the plot: 13 sections of wall in 2 lines separate very fragmentary rooms. In addition to domestic pottery and glass, a few red slip sherds with stamped motifs and a lamp date to the 5th Ct AD. In room A were 2 shallow rubbish pits with large quantities of shell of different species. The continuation of the paved road was uncovered for 12.2m in the NE corner of the plot: cleaning produced 17 coins dating the use of the road to the 4th and 5th Cts AD. In total, the excavation produced 436 coins of which the earliest related to the use of the first phase of buildings in the 2nd half of the 4th and the 5th Cts AD. The later building A occupies much of the SW part of the excavation area. It is a rectangular structure with oblique corners, covering an area of ca. 40m2, of which only the foundations are preserved. The only preserved patch of fill produced amphorae, cookware and a little African Red Slip ware. Excavation on the corner of Kath. Rossidou and Th. Sofouli street produced evidence of 2 narrow streets in the S and W of the plot, and traces of walling of the earlier building phase. Here too, 2 building phases, 4th and 1st half of the 6th Ct AD, were recognized: a destruction level of the L4th Ct contained much tile and shell. These same phases were traced in neighbouring building plots, with similar finds. Better preserved evidence comes from 22 Kouskoura street, very close by. Within an area of 150m2, was a complex with at least 3 phases and 3 infant burials (without offerings). As is generally the case, the upper construction level had the same orientation as the contemporary city plan, while those slightly earlier vary a little on the E−W axis. All 3 buildings are large, continuing beyond the boundaries of the plot. No destruction deposits were found, although there are traces of burning in many areas. Two large pits in the S part of the plot were perhaps clay workings. The fills contain the kind of material already noted: 251 bronze coins covered most of the Imperial reigns of the 4th Ct AD. The neighbouring excavation plot (on the corner of Kouskoura and Argonafton streets) revealed 2 wells, 3 rubbish pits and 18 tombs (mostly tile covered and disturbed), all of babies or infants without goods (apart from 4 coins of Emperor Valens) and all single burials with the exception of one (tomb 5) which contained 2 enchytrismoi in amphorae. Five more child burials (2 tile graves and 3 enchytrismoi) were found at the W edge of the plot, with no goods apart from one clay cup. On this plot were more than 700 4th Ct bronze coins and much shell of the known types (especially murex). An indication of the large size of the building complexes in this area is given by an excavation 2 blocks inside Kouskoura street, at 40 Papadimitriou street. Here the substantial walls of a building with 3 rooms (containing a destruction deposit datable to the reign of Justinian I) and a courtyard area were uncovered. Earlier foundations and a temporary floor with 800 associated coins date occupation of this area to the M4th Ct AD. A distinctive form of water channel made of 6 Spatheion-type amphorae (2nd half 4th−1st half 5th Ct) supplied the building. Finds were of the types noted above, including a cup containing pigments. The name of this extensive settlement remains unknown: a connection with the Kellarion mentioned in Byz sources is possible.

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Karabournaki. M. Tiverios, E. Manakidou and D. Tsiafaki (Aristotelian University, Thessaloniki) report on continuing excavation in the anc. settlement. Three trenches were opened on the hill top. Beneath mod. debris in the upper levels, all produced remains of housing, including 2 storage and food preparation rooms (Fig. 1). In trench 22-91a were part of a cooking hearth, with a small amphora by it, and 2 storage pithoi: next to the hearth were the stones of what is probably a wall and, beneath them, ash, Ar sherds and shells. Similar finds, including a hearth, came from trench 22-91b: this had a pebble floor, with LAr sherds and roof tile over it. Beside the wall in this trench was a pit, only partially excavated to date but with Ar sherds and pithos fragments. Among the relatively little pottery found in 2006, sherds ranged from the PGeo to Cl, with the majority Ar. EIA pottery included Thessalian and Euboean imports (pendant semicircle skyphoi), and all categories of ‘local’ pottery in quantity, including much silvered ware and EIA transport amphorae. E Gr imports included bird bowls, wild goat style, Chiot chalices, Ionian cups and plates (Fig. 2). Cor is rare, with an MCor column krater and then more plentiful LCor aryballoi, exaleiptra, kotylai and olpai. Attic pottery is represented by a few sherds of L bf, a very few rf, the St Valentin Group and a little bg. Among the transport amphorae are Attic SOS and Chiot types. The small finds include bobbins and loomweights, pendants, grinding stones and a faience scarab. Ethnos tis Kyriakis (16/03/2008) also reports the discovery by M. Tiverios, E. Manakidou and D. Tsiafaki of an iron-working establishment. Within a pit, masses of iron were found in handmade, chytra-like vessels.

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Anc. Kalindoia. K. Sismanidis reports on research in room E of the Sebasteion, expanding the report cited in AR 53 ([2006−2007], 65; where it is termed room V). Room E is interpreted as the bouleuterion of the city, noting the inscription of 88 AD found immediately outside it, the topographical and prosopographical implications of which are considered.   ΕΤΟΥΣ Κ ΚΑΙ Ρ ΑΡΡΙΔΑΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΚΟΤΥΣ ΟΙ ΣΩΠΑΤΡΩΥ ΚΑΙ ΣΩΠΑΤΡΟΣ ΚΟΤΥΟΣ ΤΗΝ ΕΞΕΔΡΑΝ  ΚΑΙ ΤΟ ΒΟΥΛΕΥΤΗΡΙΟΝ ΚΑΙ ΤΗΝ ΣΤΟΑΝ ΤΗΙ ΠΟΛΕΙ ΕΠΙ ΙΕΡΕΩΣ ΔΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΗΣ ΚΑΙ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡΟΣ ΘΕΟΥ ΥΙΟΥ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΥ ΑΡΡΙΔΑΙΟΥ ΤΟΥ ΣΩΠΑΤΡΟΥ   The head of Meleager noted in 2006 is discussed in detail.

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Epanomi (Byadoudi). Th. Pazaras (Aristotelian University, Thessaloniki) reports on the completion of the excavation of an ECh basilica previously reported (AR 47 [2000−2001], 88; AR 50 [2003−2004], 50). The existence of a 2nd narthex was confirmed, connected with other constructions to the W used for food preparation. Three building phases are identified. The earliest (5th Ct AD) saw the construction of the main basilica with the double narthex and the S extension buildings. During the 2nd phase, storage and food preparation areas were added along the W side of the exterior narthex. Finally, after the abandonment of the basilica (i.e., post-6th Ct and perhaps much more recently) a crude rectangular structure was erected further W.

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Poteidaia (Kassandreia). D. Koussoulakou (Archaeological Institute of Macedonia and Thrace) and V. Misailidou- Despotidou (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on a further season of excavation of 3 plots in the E sector and one in the SW of the mod. settlement. In the E, 2 Hel complexes were investigated, on either side of a N−S road. Both are bounded to the N by an E−W wall and belong to an urban plan organized in insulae. The W consisted of a central courtyard containing a well and water channel, with rooms to the E and W. On the W side, 2 rooms were connected via a stone threshold in secondary use: the N room had a patterned pebble floor set in waterproof mortar. A similar pair of rooms on the E side, together with a passage way, is less well preserved: the main street entrance was on this side. Much E and MHel pottery was found in the courtyard, plus lamps and figurines. The E complex is larger (extending further S and beyond the excavation area): a large rectangular room in the NW is bordered by 3 adjoining rooms to the S. A pebble pavement preserved in the NW corner is later than the original construction (with a tpq of the 1st half of the 3rd Ct BC). Finds from the complex include figurines, Thasian and other amphora handles, and pottery including bg and W Slope. The absence of earlier fills or of pottery predating the L4th Ct suggests that both complexes were built very soon after the foundation of Kassandreia. A 2nd, LRom, building phase (5th Ct AD) was also traced and 3 buildings identified, all of which were destroyed by fire in the M5th Ct. Scattered pits containing 12th Ct AD pottery date the latest use of the area. In the SW sector, close to the shore, a very limited excavation took place confined by mod. foundations. Traces of 6 building phases were found, dating to the Ar, Cl, Hel and Rom periods. The area was settled almost as far back as the foundation of the colony of Poteidaia. Phase 1, containing pits and 2 graves without goods, dates to the Byz period. Phase 2 produced evidence of a building (of which 2 rooms, one perhaps a cistern, were investigated) built during the 1st half of the 1st Ct AD. Phase 3, with 4 rooms of a complex, is Hel in date (producing W Slope pottery). Phase 4 had a fragmentary Cl building and fills. Phase 5 is represented by a pithos from an older, LAr, building phase (with Attic and Cor pottery). No further building remains were found. Phase 6 is an ash layer containing Ar Cor pottery and debris from a bronze-working establishment.

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Athytos (anc. Aphytos). V. Misailidou-Despotidou (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports the completion of excavation of that part of the city cemetery on the land of A. Karagianni. 47 tombs of various types were found, dating from the end of the 6th/E5th−4th Ct BC: they include limestone sarcophagi, pits, cists and primary cremations, and belong to a part of the cemetery used for the burials of both adults and children. The choice of tomb type depended both on period and the age of the deceased: thus all 6 sarcophagi (all very carefully worked) hold adult burials of the 1st half of the 5th Ct and the 9 primary cremations are again probably of adults and date to the 2nd half of the 5th−4th Ct. Only 4 cist graves were found, all of the 5th Ct. Pits were used throughout: of the 28 excavated, 6 or 7 date to the end of the 6th−1st half of the 5th Ct and the remainder, child burials, in so far as it is possible to tell from grave goods, are split equally between the 2nd half of the 5th and 4th Cts. This appears to be the peak of use of this part of the cemetery. Cremation is preferred for adults, while children are interred in pits or cists. Grave orientation varies and no significance can be seen in it. The presence of jewellery is seen as a criterion of female burial. There was great variation in the quality and quantity of grave goods: pottery predominates, along with bronze, iron and some glass vessels, strigils, figurines, silver mouth-plates and a spool. Ten child burials and one adult lack goods. The oldest burial (L6th−E5th Ct), of a girl child, contained 75 items, including a little jewellery and much pottery − 49 kotyliskoi, 9 hydriskoi, 2 miniature lekanides, a kotyle, a conical oinochoe and a bg kylix (all Cor, apart from the kylix). Many sarcophagi contained particularly rich goods. The burial of a young man in grave 12 (2nd quarter of the 5th Ct) contained 16 items, including a rf lekythos, a bg skyphos and lekythoi, a glass amphoriskos, a bronze lebes, a trefoil-mouthed oinochoe and a strigil, a silver mouth-plate and an ostrich egg. Tomb 30 (ca. 480−470) contained 14 items, mostly Attic pots (among which is a rf lekythos depicting a lyre player, probably of the Berlin Painter’s workshop), Attic lekythoi, a Cor trefoil-mouthed oinochoe and a silver mouthplate decorated with a wheel in the middle and lotus flowers at either side. Bronze vessels in this tomb comprise an iron exaleiptron with bronze handles and lid, placed on a tripod with lion-paw feet, and a bronze lebes. The male burial in sarcophagus 20 (2nd half of the 5th Ct) is noted as the richest in the cemetery, with 53 items. 48 of these are pots (mostly Attic, bg, bf and rf lekythoi, also bf cups and 2 plastic vases in the form of korai), including a large (0.39m h.) rf lekythos by the Pan Painter showing Hermes preparing to kill Argos. There is also a bronze vessel and an iron exaleiptron. The E part of the plot was not used for burials: here a walled, open area 21m x 5.5m was uncovered, which seems to have been used to hold waste items (undecorated and bg sherds of domestic and finewares including much bg and W Slope, lamps, figurine fragments, burnt clay, small metal items, loomweights and animal bone). This was probably originally a section of road serving the cemetery which was closed off after it went out of use. Thasian stamped amphora handles from this area include workshop names such as ΔΗΜΑΚΛΗΣ and ΧΑΙΡΕΑΣ and names on sealings include ΒΙΩΝΟΣ, ΚΑΛΛΙΜΑΧΟΥ, ΜΙΚΙΩΝΟΣ and ΤΙΜΑΙΝΕΤΟΥ. Debris from a potter’s workshop includes wasters and kiln supports. The variety of material found in this area indicates that it was part of a larger residential/craft area which contained a potter’s workshop. Pottery dates largely to the Hel period, with some of the 4th Ct BC: coins range from those of Philip II to those of Thessaloniki of 187−168 BC. The exterior wall of a large structure was traced for 21m on the E edge of the plot, next to the waste-disposal area: it continues into the neighbouring plot. The NW corner of this complex seems to consist of small rooms: it does not communicate with the waste-disposal area, but material from fill within the rooms is similar in date and type to that dumped (and there is a further coin of Thessaloniki of the same date). The destruction of the complex is dated to the 2nd half of the 1st Ct AD by a hoard of 5 coins within the destruction level in one room. While too little of the complex has been excavated to determine its function, it is surely the source of the dumped material. These are the first Hel finds from anc. Aphytos and confirm the view that the city centre was largely abandoned after the 4th Ct BC earthquake and activity thereafter moved outside the Cl city limits.

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Mikris Volvis. A. Lioutas and S. Kotsas (ΙΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on rescue excavation within a Neo settlement on a hill 1.5km from the mod. village. In the E part of the excavation area was a L Antique cemetery: W of this were pits containing Neo material, principally pottery. The estimated settlement area is ca. 200 x 150m. Only the small sector threatened by road construction was excavated (N−NE parts). 138 pits were located (0.5−1.8m di. and 0.3−1.2m d., one stonelined and another 2 possibly to be interpreted as house basements), scattered over the entire excavation area. Remains of 3 houses were also revealed. The function of the pits is hard to determine: finds come mostly from fill introduced when they were closed, and they cannot be connected with any particular house. The houses were built with wooden frames coated in clay: 2 had hearths with stone frames. A tomb containing a single extended inhumation, but no goods, was located in the centre of the excavation area and is presumed to be contemporary with the settlement. Numerous sherds were collected from the settlement fills, mostly local plainwares (poorly fired, red or red-brown clay with limestone inclusions), but with some black burnished ware: there was no painted pottery (although a few sherds with incised decoration). The best preserved pottery comes from the pits: the most common shapes are bowls and flat-bottomed basins, chytrae, cups, round-bodied closed vessels and pithoid jars: conical bowls are rarer. Small finds are mostly stone tools: other finds include stone axes, pestles and millstones with traces of use, a few figurines, 2 clay seals and 3 stone pendants (1 anthropoid and the other 2 geometric in design). The closest parallels for the pottery date to the earlier Neo phases. The L Antique cemetery contained 113 tombs arranged along common N−S walls, plus the stone foundations of a building of the same period. There were 98 cist tombs, 14 pits and a vaulted tomb (3.1m x 3m, 1.6m h., with a step down into the chamber). The vaulted tomb is built of flat stone sections set horizontally and cemented with lime mortar: the interior has a 0.01m thick layer of white plaster.  All the burials in the cemetery were inhumations: 61 contained goods such as plainware oinochoai, lamps, ladles and bowls. Metalwork comprised silver and bronze coins and earrings, bronze rings, gold sheet, and glass, bronze and faience beads. Architectural remains and pottery contemporary with the cemetery were found during fieldwalking on a low hill N of the cemetery.

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E. Kambouroglou (EPSVE) and K. Peristeri (Director, ΚΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on continuing survey to locate flint quarries and processing sites (AR 52 [2005−2006], 94), with the location of 7 new sites in the areas of Therma, Choumniko and Langadi. These bring the total of sites located by the survey to 12.

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Amphipolis. K. Peristeri, E. Zografou and K. Darakis (ΚΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on rescue excavation along the line of  the road from the Byz tower at the NW entrance to mod. Amphipolis. Antiquities were found in 7 locations. (1) Part of a Hel house lay  between the tower and the entrance to the village: part of a large paved courtyard was found. Coins and pottery (bg and rf skyphoi, kantharoi, a plate, lamp and figurines) from the floor and destruction level date to the 3rd Ct BC. (2) Halfway along the new road, a complex of 9 interconnecting rooms with earth floors leading into a courtyard (all under a destruction level) dates to the Hel period (coins and pottery of the 3rd−2nd Ct BC). The layout, and large quantity of pithos and (Thasian) amphora sherds in the destruction level, suggest a storage function. Pottery includes W Slope wares, lamps, plates, skyphoi, kantharoi and a few terracotta figurines. A large number of loomweights and spindle-whorls, iron spearheads and hooks relate to everyday activities. (3) A small section of a further construction was located exactly between these 2 sites, with finds similar to those from site (2). (4−7) A few metres further on towards the tower was a series of 4 rainwater cisterns, cut into the limestone and lined with waterproof cement. All produced a large quantity of pottery and figurines of the 3rd Ct BC (Thasian amphorae, fishplates, bg skyphoi, kantharoi with W Slope decoration, etc.). These cannot at present be connected with any particular site.   E. Zografou (ΚΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports the location by illegal excavation of a Macedonian tomb on a hill close to the junction of the national roads from Thessaloniki to Kavala and Thessaloniki to Drama in the area of Amphipolis. The tomb had previously been robbed and may also have been entered in Rom times (noting 2 lamps in the prothalamos). The tomb had a main chamber (3.08m x 3.05m), a prothalamos (3.08m x 1.58m) with entrance from the E and a vaulted roof: the 6m l. dromos was cut into bedrock. The masonry is isodomic, of local limestone: the façade is plain. Subsequent to the initial construction (when the main entrance was walled up as usual), a rectangular, probably roofed, stone structure was erected in front of the prothalamos, halving the length of the dromos. The roof was supported on 4 sections of reused Doric architrave from an unknown monument: on the white plaster covering it were traces of a red band and there were also traces of red applied directly to the limestone. The only indication of internal decoration in the tomb is the imitation of isodomic masonry in red paint on the W wall of the prothalamos (with an M incised on the corresponding tympanum). Human bone (plus a small red-slip flask) was found across the prothalamos, especially on the N side, probably displaced by tomb robbers. In the main chamber were 2 sarcophagi against the N and S walls and a small ossuary against the W, which contained the burial of an infant younger than 2.5 years. Their contents had been removed and scattered over the floor within a ca. 0.3m d. level with localized traces of burning. At least 6 skeletons (male and female) were found, and while the sequence of burials cannot be reconstructed, the roofed dromos structure may have been built to facilitate reuse of the tomb. Surviving grave goods indicate use from the E3rd− M2nd Ct BC. A little gold jewellery survives − bands, leaves and acorns − and, from the child burial, a pair of small earrings with lion-head terminals and a miniature gold coin for the deceased’s mouth. Notable among the pottery is the range of pyxides, decorated and plain, and tear-bottles; 3 L3rd−M2nd Ct BC lamps were found on the threshold and by 2 crania outside the N sarcophagus, with further vessels placed here and on the threshold of the prothalamos. Numerous iron objects include miniature keys, strigils, blades and spearheads, and surviving bronze includes bands probably from a chest: bone items included 7 beads. Pottery found outside the built dromos included the most characteristic 2nd Ct forms (notably a large Megarian bowl).

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Ennea Odoi. D. Malamidou (ΚΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on rescue excavation of Ar tombs over a wide area between hill 133 and Alepotrypa, which lead her to support the location of Ennea Odoi on hill 133. Ar tombs from the area of the Kasta hill are presented, most previously reported (see AR 51 [2004−2005], 81). At Mesolakkia, a 3rd cist grave is added to the 2 reported in AR 53 ([2006−2007], 70). This female burial contained 2 small bronze figure-of-8 fibulae at shoulder level, plus a larger one at the left shoulder, silver spirals in the hair, an iron pin, bronze ring, a biconical bronze bead at the throat, 2 bronze bracelets (one on each arm), and a plainware oinochoe and Phari type skyphos. Radiocarbon dating of the wooden bridge of Amphipolis (Y. Maniatis, Y. Facorellis, D. Malamidou and Ch. Koukouli-Chrysanthaki, Archaeometry forthcoming) indicates a construction phase in the L6th Ct BC (550−480 BC), implying the presence of a road leading into the area of hill 133.

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Domiros. K. Peristeri, E. Zografou and Th. Salonikios (ΚΗ' ΕΠΚΑ) report on rescue excavation of a LAr−Hel cemetery and a LNeo clay extraction area. 39 tombs (18 cists, 18 pits, 2 tile graves and one exposed burial) were found in 3 groups. Group 1 (at Ydatodexameni): 4 cists of limestone slabs, 2 of which contained grave goods, the other 2 having been disturbed. A L6th−E5th Ct date is proposed on the basis of a Cor exaleiptron and 3 bronze bow fibulae. Group 2 (at Ydatopyrgos): a dense concentration of 20 tombs (2 almost entirely destroyed, 16 pits, of which 6 have tile covers, and 6 cists), of which 7 contained goods. These date from the L6th−E5th (based on a Cor exaleiptron) to the L4th−3th Ct BC (11 bronze coins in tomb 10): other grave goods noted are a hoard of 19 bronze coins of Philip II, a silver obol of the Alexander III type issued by Amphipolis, a bronze bow fibula, 2 alabastra and a necklace of glass beads. Group 3 (Melagia site): 16 tombs (10 cists, 5 pits and one open burial) constructed in the same way as the previous groups. Two were disturbed, but only 3 had no goods. The richest tomb, 23, was the burial of a young woman containing a squat lekythos, 5 pairs of silver and bronze earrings, 6 bronze fibulae, a silver ring with gold leaf decoration on the bezel, a necklace of bone beads, a bronze ear-pick and tweezers, and a terracotta female protome, all dating to the M4th Ct. One cist tomb contained the burial of a youth and a child; 3 silver Thasian coins were mingled with the bones of the youth, dating this burial to the L5th Ct, ca. 50 years before that of the child, which was accompanied by a squat lekythos, bronze bracelets and a ring, and silver earrings. One disturbed cist tomb (M4th Ct) contained gold earrings with lion head terminals, parts of a gilded wreath, a bronze ring, a coin of Philip II and a squat lekythos. Other goods from this area (all M4th Ct) include: plainware vessels (amphoriskos, lamp, oinochoe), squat lekythoi, a bg kantharos and a tear-bottle. The 2 LAr graves contained bronze bow fibulae. Thereafter there seems to be a gap in use of the area through the 5th Ct, although only a fraction of the cemetery has been excavated. The location of the related settlement is unknown. One isolated child burial without goods was found located between groups 1 and 2. At Melagia, 5 pits from clay extraction were investigated: LNeo pottery collected included incised and black-on-red ware. The chance find of a funerary stele of the 3rd quarter of the 1st Ct AD indicates later activity in the area.

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Promachon-Topolnica. K. Trantalidou and G. Gioni report on analysis of the bucrania from the large underground chamber (Neo settlement, phase II).

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Demokratias station: at Monastiriou 6 and Odysseus, just outside the W city wall, a mass of clay covered an area of ca. 2.2m x 1.1m. A  potter’s kiln was located. Further kilns located in rescue excavation at  the ΧΑΝΘ (YMCA) football pitch and at 48 Giannitson street, illustrate the popularity of locations on the fringes of the city for installations of this kind. Demokratias-Venizelou: at Egnatias 22 and Antigonidon, a LRom−ECh apsidal structure lay 0.25m below the mod.pavement, oriented N−S (wall w. 0.6m, maximum di. 1.25m).

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Dans le cadre de l’installation de canalisations/hydragogues à Thessalonique en 2006, plusieurs maisons protobyzantines à triclinium ont été découvertes : angle des rues Aghiou Dimitriou et Pasteur : la partie Nord d’une abside et du mur d’une pièce latérale construit en appareil mixte d’une épaisseur de 1 m a été découverte. Aucun sol n’était conservé ; le matériel indique une occupation à l’époque protobyzantine. angle des rues Olympiados et Aghias Sophias : découverte de la salle absidale du triclinium ainsi que d’une partie de la pièce au Sud, avec son entrée marquée par un seuil à l’Ouest. Un sol de mosaïque non décorée a été dégagé. Les murs étaient recouverts d’un enduit peint imitant le placage de marbre. Le sol de la pièce au Sud était pavé d’une mosaïque fine et décorée avec un panneau central. Le mobilier recueilli date de la fin du IVe s. – début du Ve s. apr. J.-C. rue Aghiou Dimitriou (entre les rues Photakou et Apostolou Pavlou) : découverte d’une partie d’abside orientée vers le Nord, associée à un sol en mosaïque.

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Au Monastère de Zographou, P. Theocharidis, N. Mertzimekis et I. Tavlakis (10e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) a effectué en 2006 des sondages qui ont livré des informations sur les états byzantin et post-byzantin du péribole de l’édifice. La fouille a mis au jour un réseau complexe de structures, préservées à peu de profondeur sous le sol pavé de la cour actuelle : sections d’enceinte, murs, pavements de sols, citernes, canalisations.

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Dans la région de Petroto, au Sud-Est d’Alistrati, Ch. Kontaxi (Éphorie de paléoanthropologie et de spéléologie) rend compte de l’exploration, en 2006, d’une grotte longue de 300 m ayant fourni de nombreux tessons préhistoriques (du Néolithiques et du Bronze Ancien). Les fouilles se sont portées sur la partie centrale de la grotte, sur la zone près de la paroi Sud et à l’intérieur de la chambre Sud. Le sondage central a livré deux couches principales, une de couleur marron qui comportait de nombreux tessons de céramique et une couche grise constituée de plusieurs niveaux de cendres et d’argile. On a identifié des niveaux de circulation successifs avec des foyers circulaires entourés de trous de poteaux et on a recueilli une grande quantité de céramique du NR II, des outils en os, quelques outils en pierre, un vase miniature à l’intérieur d’un foyer, ainsi que les fragments de trois crânes et d’une mandibule humains. Les sondages près de la paroi Sud ont livré du mobilier similaire à celui du sondage central. Dans la chambre Sud, on a mis au jour un niveau de circulation assez étendu (16 m2) avec des traces de feu et de la céramique monochrome. Sur ce niveau, on a dégagé 12 trous de poteaux dont l’usage n’a pas encore pu être déterminé. Les analyses de charbon ont livré des datations légèrement plus anciennes que celles déterminées par la céramique.

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À Édessa, A. Chrysostomou (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a effectué en 2006 un sondage dans la rue Archiereos Panteleïmonos au cours de travaux de canalisation, qui a permis la mise au jour d’un segment du proteichisma (larg. 2,20 m), confirmant ainsi son tracé.

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À Exaplatanos, A. Chrysostomou (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques), ayant noté la présence de tessons de céramique en surface, a effectué en 2006 plusieurs sondages dans le champ Asvestopoulou. L’un des sondages, en particulier, a révélé une stratigraphie composée de plusieurs couches : une couche très noire, comportant des boules d’argile, une couche plus claire et une couche marron sableuse avec des traces de feu. Le mobilier recueilli compte de la céramique du Néolithique Récent et Moyen, des outils en pierre, un fragment de figurine du Néolithique Récent.

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Dans le secteur Nord-Ouest de la ville ancienne d’Aigai, A. Kottaridi (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 de nouveaux sondages sur le grand bâtiment (KIV) et le portique en Pi de l’époque hellénistique tardive (KIVa) qui s’étend au Sud-Est de celui-là. La fouille a révélé un grand bâtiment d’une surface de de 1000 m2, avec des murs de 0,50 m d’épaisseur, disposant d’une cour presque carrée et semi-couverte. Tous les sols n’ont pas encore été mis au jour. L’édifice était couvert d’un toit en tuiles de type laconien, ses murs étaient recouverts de stucs blancs et polychromes. Des fragments d’opus sectile en marbre ont été recueillis dans la pièce Sud-Est. Par ailleurs, immédiatement à côté du rempart Ouest de la ville, à l’intérieur du lit du cours d’eau Paliopanaghia, on a identifié les vestiges d’un bâtiment qui aurait été détruit à l’époque d’Amyntas III ; il se trouve en face d’un autre bâtiment daté de l’époque de Philippe II et connu depuis 1993.

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À Verria, I. Graikos (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage dans la rue Pierion, à l’occasion de travaux de canalisation, et mis au jour deux tombes à fosse et plusieurs cavités et conduites liées aux activités artisanales de ce secteur hors les murs de la ville antique.

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À Verria, I. Graikos (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur le terrain Kaïserli et mis au jour un segment de canalisation d’approvisionnement en eau. La canalisation, creusée, munie d’une couverture voûtée, traversait sur une longueur de 6 m le terrain qui se situe dans la partie Ouest de la ville antique, à l’intérieur du rempart. La date de construction de la canalisation n’a pu être déterminée, puisqu’elle a été utilisée comme refuge au cours de la seconde guerre mondiale.

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Au Nord-Est de la ville de Verria, N. Poulakis (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 des sondages à plusieurs endroits des rues Pavlou Mela et Megalou Alexandrou, dans le cadre de travaux d’électricité, et mis au jour des segments de murs, de canalisations et d’hypocaustes appartenant à des bains dont la datation n’a pas pu être déterminée.

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À Verria, N. Poulakis (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur un terrain situé sur Leoforos Stratou et mis au jour une tombe à tuile à moitié détruite. La tombe conservait une partie du squelette, mais aucun mobilier.

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À Verria, N. Poulakis (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) rend compte de la découverte fortuite, en 2006, d’un fragment de relief représentant un buste féminin à moitié nu, tenant un himation dans la main gauche, une tête masculine à droite et les traces d’une deuxième tête masculine. Ce fragment provient probablement d’un sarcophage. Un petit sondage a été effectué à l’endroit de la découverte et on a dégagé de la céramique commune, de la céramique à glaçure et deux pipes ottomanes.

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Dans la région d’Asomata, I. Graikos (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur le champ Moïsidis, au lieu-dit Tsardaki, et a mis au jour des vestiges d’occupation du Bronze Récent (principalement des tessons de vases pithoïdes et quelques phiale aux anses triangulaires), ainsi qu’une tombe à tuile de l’époque impériale.

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Dans la région de Trilophos, N. Poulakis et E. Psarra (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) ont mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage au lieu-dit Kapsoura, à l’occasion de travaux routiers, et ont mis au jour les vestiges de deux bâtiments, dont le caractère artisanal a probablement été identifié dans l’une des pièces. Les tessons recueillis datent de l’époque protobyzantine.

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À l’occasion de travaux routiers entre Verria et Skydra, à 8 km de Verria, N. Poulakakis et E. Psarra (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) rendent compte d’une vaste fouille de sauvetage en 2006 sur la colline de Bas-Karter, un site connu auparavant par des trouvailles du Néolithique Récent et par une fouille de sauvetage de petite ampleur qui a livré des fosses-dépotoirs remplies de céramique hellénistique et romaine. En 2006, on a fouillé deux zones, l’une sur la pente Sud et l’autre sur la pente Nord de la colline. Les sondages effectués sur la pente Nord ont livré des vestiges d’un complexe architectural orienté Nord-Ouest/Sud-Est (dim. 22,40 x 16 m), dont les murs définissent sept espaces recouverts par des couches de destruction contenant des tuiles et des briques. Au centre du complexe un petit espace a été interprété comme salle de stockage (pitheon). Au Nord du bâtiment, on a dégagé un empierrement qui correspond probablement au reste d’une terrasse. Les sondages de la pente Sud ont révélé une grande quantité de céramique dispersée et des fragments d’un pithos, ainsi que des murs appartenant à une maison et aux restes d’une terrasse. Le mobilier recueilli en surface et dans les sondages comprend de la céramique préhistorique et de la céramique antique et protobyzantine, mais la majorité date de l’époque hellénistique et romaine. On compte notamment des fragments de skyphos peints, une anse d’amphore du groupe de Parménisque, des tessons de type West Slope, des fragments d’amphores macédoniennes et de pithoi, des objets métalliques, des monnaies. On estime que les vestiges dégagés sur la colline de Bas-Karter appartiennent à un habitat rural occupé entre la fin de l’époque classique et le IVe s. apr. J.-C. et situé sur le territoire de Verria.

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Dans la région de Kastri Kastanias, I. Graikos (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur la colline d’Arapis, dans le cadre de projets d’exploitation de marbre, et a mis au jour une tombe à ciste qui se trouve au sommet d’un tumulus. La fouille de la tombe à ciste a livré de la céramique tournée et une monnaie d’Hadrien ; elle a également révélé que son sol constitue le toit d’une tombe à ciste double qui se trouve en-dessous et dont le remblai comporte uniquement des tessons de céramique tournée à la main et qui proviennent d’un canthare du début de l’Âge du Fer.

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À l’Ouest de Verria, N. Poulakakis (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 des recherches archéologiques sur plusieurs sites fortifiés près de Koumaria : À Megalo Kastri, un site constitué de deux collines fortifiées, les relevés topographiques et les sondages ont révélé que la colline Nord était fortifiée sur son pourtour (long. 1241 m) et que son segment oriental est renforcé par trois bastions orthogonaux contre le parement interne. La céramique recueillie en surface et dans les sondages n’a pas donné de datation certaine, mais on a noté une prédominance de céramique hellénistique et romaine. Sur une colline située au Sud-Est de Koumaria, au lieu-dit Mikro Kastri, on a exploré les restes d’une fortification qui s’étend sur les côtés Nord, Ouest et Sud ; le côté Est, très abrupte, n’est pas fortifié. On a repéré un angle sur le côté Nord : il pourrait correspondre à une tour protégeant une porte. Aucun édifice n’a été repéré à l’intérieur du rempart. La céramique recueillie date du début de l’époque hellénistique principalement. Au lieu-dit Patoma, à l’Est de Koumaria, on a découvert deux sites sur lesquels on a identifié des restes de rempart sur une longueur de 30-40 m et des empierrements qui peuvent provenir de l’effondrement d’un rempart. On n’a pas trouvé de céramique sur ces sites.

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Au Sud de Koumaria, N. Poulakakis (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mis au jour en 2006 une tombe à ciste au lieu-dit Paliouria, près d’Alonakia. La tombe, constituée de dalles de schistes a été retrouvée pillée et fortement perturbée. À l’intérieur on a identifié des restes de crémation et une vertèbre calcinée, ainsi que d’autres os, appartenant à deux squelettes et qui ne portaient pas de traces de feu. On y a trouvé des tessons de céramique de la fin de l’époque romaine ou de l’époque protobyzantine, mais leur lien avec les sépultures n’est pas clair.

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À Naoussa, E. Psarra (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur le champ Kandylidi, dans le cadre de l’aménagement de la zone de stationnement de l’Ecole d’Aristote et du Centre Culturel de Naoussa, à Isvoria, et a mis au jour un bâtiment orthogonal dans la partie Sud-Ouest du champ (dim. 6,50 x 7,90 m), conservé en fondations uniquement. La céramique recueillie date de la fin de l’époque hellénistique. Les restes de briques effondrées indiquent que l’élévation du bâtiment était en briques. Après l’abandon du bâtiment à l’époque romaine, celui-ci est traversé par une canalisation en terre cuite.

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Entre Kopanos et Chariessa, E. Psarra (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage au niveau de la ligne ferroviaire, dans le cadre de travaux de canalisation et a mis au jour une tombe rupestre à une seule chambre (dim. 2,70 x 2,75 m). Les parois de la tombe étaient stuquées et on a recueilli des vases entiers sur le sol : des unguentaria, deux oenochoés, un pithos-amphore, un canthare en bronze, qui permettent de dater l’utilisation de la tombe à la fin du IIIe et au début du IIe s. av. J.-C.

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Dans la région de Kopanos, E. Psarra (XVIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a poursuivi en 2006 la fouille du complexe architectural mis au jour dans la ville antique de Miéza, au lieu-dit Belovina. On s’est concentré sur le grand bâtiment en Γ qui s’étend sur l’extrémité Nord-Ouest du site (champ Kosmidi), notamment sur les pièces de l’aile Ouest (fig. 1-2). On a dégagé six pièces carrées (4,80 m de côté), s’ouvrant par deux sur un vestibule commun, comme c’était le cas sur l’aile Nord. On leur attribue une fonction de salles de banquet, comme pour les pièces de l’aile Nord. La fouille de 2006 a également confirmé que les vestiges situés sur le champ Kavallari, immédiatement au Sud du bâtiment en Γ, lui appartiennent également et constituent l’extrémité Sud de son aile Ouest. Ainsi l’aile Ouest atteint une longueur de 98 m et l’aile Nord, 55 m. Au niveau des fondations de l’un des murs de vestibule de l’aile Ouest la fouille a dégagé un trésor de 19 monnaies d’argent (fig. 3), composé de frappes posthumes d’Alexandre III, de frappes de Philippe III, de Lysimaque et une monnaie de Locres Oppountion, dont la plupart proviennent d’Asie Mineure. L’ensemble des vestiges dégagés, identifiés à ceux d’un hestiatorion, permet de mettre ce complexe architectural en rapport avec le sanctuaire d’Asclépion voisin. D’après les monnaies recueillies, le bâtiment aurait été construit entre le deuxième quart du IVe s. et le premier quart du IIIe s. av. J.-C.

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À Vergina, P. Phaklaris (Université de Thessalonique) a poursuivi en 2006 la fouille du rempart de la ville antique de Vergina. Les recherches ont permis d’apporter des informations chronologiques quant aux inondations du torrent qui ont détruit le rempart, de déterminer la date de destruction du rempart et de confirmer sa date de construction, à l’époque de Cassandre, après 305 ou au début du IIIe s. av. J.-C., d’après les monnaies recueillies dans les niveaux de fondation du rempart.  Le reste du mobilier se compose de céramique hellénistique, de fragments de figurines en terre cuite, de tuiles timbrées, notamment.

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À Verria, sur le site archéologique d’Aghios Ioannis Eleïmonos, rue Vénizélou, A. Petkos (11e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) a mené en 2006 une fouille préventive en vue de la construction d’une nouvelle église, et a mis au jour des vestiges de construction de l’époque protobyzantine. On a mis au jour les vestiges de deux basiliques protobyzantines successives, l’une du Ve s. apr. J.-C. et la seconde, une basilique à transept, construite au VIe s. (fig. 1). Après la destruction de la deuxième basilique, à l’époque byzantine, la zone est entièrement occupée par une nécropole : plusieurs tombes à ciste ont été dégagées, ainsi qu’une tombe à voûte. Entre les tombes, on a mis au jour de nombreuses réductions de tombes. La nécropole a été utilisée durant les périodes médiobyzantine et tardobyzantine.

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À Verria, immédiatement au Nord-Est du site d’Aghios Ioannis Eleïmonos, A. Petkos (11e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur la rue Vénizélou et a mis au jour les vestiges d’un grand complexe thermal, probablement public (fig. 1). On en a dégagé une grande pièce orthogonale (dim. 13,50 x 8,50 m) qui aboutit sur une abside à l’Ouest. Le sol de la pièce comporte des canalisations qui fonctionnaient comme hypocaustes. La pièce communiquait avec deux autres pièces de la partie chaude des thermes qui étaient équipées d’hypocaustes. Au Sud-Est de ces pièces se trouvait un espace semi-couvert qui comportait un impluvium (dim. 3,60 x 3,10 m). Le mode de construction et le mobilier permettent de dater ces vestiges de la fin du IVe-début du Ve s. apr. J.-C. Par ailleurs, le complexe était longé à l’Ouest par une rue pavée de petites pierres, de galets et de fragments de briques. Enfin, dans l’angle Sud-Ouest du terrain, on a dégagé une partie de l’aile Nord de la nef transversale de la basilique protobyzantine d’Aghios Ioannis Eleïmonos, ainsi qu’une citerne et un puits.

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À Verria, G. Skiadaresis (11e éphorie des antiquités byzantines) a mené en 2006 une fouille de sauvetage sur un terrain situé rue Riga Pheraiou, dans le secteur de Kyriotissa et à l’extrémité Sud de la ville fortifiée, et a mis au jour un segment du rempart (long. 13,05 m ; larg. 1-1,20 m ; haut. 0,80-1,25 m). Ce segment du rempart appartient au programme de renforcement de la fortification au IIIe s. apr. J.-C. Au Nord du rempart, on a dégagé des segments de murs protobyzantins appartenant à des installations artisanales et d’autres murs de l’époque ottomane, ainsi que cinq sépultures protobyzantines d’enfants disposées dans des tombes à tuile.

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Au Sud-Est de la commune de Sphelinos, K. Péristéri (XXVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) a poursuivi en 2006 la fouille de sauvetage de l’habitat préhistorique (toumba) en trois nouveaux secteurs qui ont livré des vestiges de deux murs, dont l’un est construit en alternance d’assises de briques crues et de pierres plates, les fondations d’un troisième mur, ainsi que les restes d’un sol pavé et d’un autre sol en argile blanc. On a recueilli peu de mobilier, parmi lequel des tessons de pithoi à fond pointu et des tessons de vases de stockage plus petits, mais aussi des tessons de céramique à décor incisé et une phialè à deux anses horizontales surélevées et à décor incisé.

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Dans la région de Sidirokastro, K. Péristéri (XXVIIIe éphorie des antiquités préhistoriques et classiques) rend compte en 2006 d’une fouille de sauvetage sur le site d’un sanctuaire sous abri d’Apollon, des Nymphes et de Pan, à Mavros Vrachos. On y a mis au jour un mur de péribole (long. 10,50 m) avec des traces de feu à l’intérieur. Le mobilier recueilli comporte de la céramique commune, des monnaies et des os de caprinés : le site a été occupé de manière passagère par des bergers du IVe s. apr. J.-C., période à laquelle le sanctuaire est détruit.

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AVERTISSEMENT
La Chronique des fouilles en ligne ne constitue en aucun cas une publication des découvertes qui y sont signalées.
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