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Anc. Agora. J.M. Camp (ASCSA) reports on the 2007 season of excavation. In section BZ south (Fig. 1) 2 primary areas were investigated: the N−S road and the areas W of the road. In the road, we continued to take down the very hard-packed gravel surfaces, mostly of the 4th Ct AD. In doing so, we fully exposed the later water supply lines found in earlier seasons, one of terracotta and 2 of lead. These will all have been for fresh water and were probably pressure lines. Lower down, we cleared more of the deep street drain and, at the extreme N, another subsidiary channel entering it from the W. All these channels, both supply and drainage, were in use in the 4th or 5th Ct AD. To the W, we explored deeper fills under the Rom levels. In one area we exposed a fairly well-preserved pyre, of the type known from across the anc. street and in other areas of the Agora. They are usually deliberately buried under the floors of private houses or commercial buildings and the example found this year seems to date to the L4th or E3rd Ct BC. It contained a lamp, a drinking cup, a pyxis and several of the characteristic unglazed plates, cooking pots and small saucers. In section BZ north we excavated mostly Cl and Hel levels in and behind the Cl commercial building. One of the major gains of the season was to establish beyond doubt that the commercial building extended this far N. More of its E back wall was exposed, along with several cross-walls, and we can now speak with some confidence of at least 6 rooms/shops set side-by-side along the E side of the street.  An intermediate phase of the building was uncovered in the form of a draw-shaft and part of the tunnel of a Hel cistern complex found outside the building to the E. It was of standard form, a vertical shaft waterproofed with a good hard white mortar. The shaft itself was ca. 0.75−0.9m di., preserved to a d. of ca. 2.5m. The tunnel runs off to the NW and may be heading to a collapsed cistern located within the building itself. The tunnel showed signs of collapse about 1m from the draw-shaft, and will have to be explored in future seasons. Fill within the shaft suggests that it went out of use in the 2nd half of the 3rd Ct BC. A wall of the 1st Ct BC/AD was eventually built over the mouth of the draw-shaft. Finds from this season in this area included several lead and terracotta tokens or seal impressions. In the Agora we have about 900 examples, carrying a wide range of symbols and depictions. Some of this year’s finds were of types previously known, such as one showing a round shield decorated with the letter A (Fig. 2). This type is part of a series showing shields, breastplates, helmets and greaves, thought to have been used for issuing armour from the state arsenal. Other examples found this year are more unusual, in particular a small lead token with the stamped depiction of a ‘Gallic’ shield, recognizable from its elongated oval shape and the central spine (Fig. 2). Such shields were used by N invaders into Greece in the 270s BC, usually referred to as Gauls or Celts. They were largely turned back by the Greeks (especially the Aitolians and Athenians) at Thermopylai in 279 BC, though a small contingent attacked Delphi and was driven off with divine help (Pausanias 10.19−23). In section Γ we continued to explore the building traditionally identified as the Strategeion, as well as the slight remains of Cl buildings lying somewhat to the E. In the ‘Strategeion’ we excavated a series of well-preserved levels in the E part of the building, presumably successive floors covering its period of use.  This included a pit full of marble chips, itself overlying a pit filled with amphorae. Parts of at least 6 were recovered; though found in fragments, at least some of the amphorae seem to have been deposited while still whole. From their shapes, several seem to have come from the N Aegean − perhaps from Thasos − while 2 others are recognizable as coming from Chios. One had an incised inscription on the shoulder: a ΔΠ ligature followed by 3 vertical strokes (= 53), presumably a measure of volume or cost. Associated bg pottery found in the pit (Pheidias mug, stamped bowl, unglazed plate with moulded rim) suggests that it was filled in the L5th Ct BC, though the amphorae are said by Mark Lawall to be from the 1st quarter of the 4th Ct BC. Elsewhere, fill under the floor went down as much as 3m, producing pottery of the L8th and E7th Cts BC. The ‘Strategeion’, carved out of bedrock at the W, was set over a surprisingly deep gully in its E part. Further E, we began to explore a series of small irregular buildings, in part to determine if they represent houses, shops or public buildings. There are at least 2 phases. The earlier remains, only partly explored, consist of the rubble walls of buildings in use in the 4th and 5th Cts BC, lying W of the main road, which at that time led into the Agora square from the SW. These remains were replaced by walls of more substantial construction, presumably in the LCl or Hel period. In the M2nd Ct BC, when the Middle Stoa was built, the line of the old road to the E was covered and the road was shifted W, covering much of this area with a succession of hard-packed gravel surfaces. Small finds from section Γ this year included lead weights, terracotta (Fig. 3) and lead tokens, bone eyelets, the lower part of a rf lebes gamikos (Fig. 4) and part of the marble eye from a trireme. In section BH (Fig. 5) we cleared the last of the 10th/11th Ct walls and other Byz installations (Fig. 6) and began to go lower, into LRom fills. Here, further excavation confirmed what we suspected last year, that we have uncovered a stretch of the back wall of the Stoa Poikile, the first new section to become visible since the W end of the building was found over 25 years ago. The new part found this season consists of 2 adjacent blocks from the outer face of the back wall of the building, made of limestone and originally joined at the ends with a double-T clamp. They are orthostat blocks, i.e., from the first standing course of the wall. The back faces are finished with a drove (flat-faced chisel), while the top surfaces have been finished with a claw chisel. Each block has a projecting boss left on its outer face. The difference in the tooling and the presence of bosses so low down leave open the possibility that the blocks are reused. Blocks in secondary use, presumably made available by the Persian destruction of Athens, were found in the W foundations. The tops of the new blocks lie ca. 1.3m higher than any part of the building seen to the W. To the SE, the top of a limestone unfluted column shaft ca. 0.6m di. appeared below the Byz walls, lying very close to the projected placement of an interior Ionic column of the stoa and also apparently in situ (Fig. 7). It stands to a level of ca. 53.2masl, much higher than anything seen to the W. If it is in situ, then we are unlikely to see the E end of the building, which can lie no closer than 4m NE of the column, beyond the present limits of the trench. As this column falls 44m from the W end, the minimum l. of the stoa must be 48m. In any case, at present it looks as though the E part of the building, where we are presently excavating, is appreciably better preserved than further W. The identification of the stoa remains controversial, with several scholars preferring to see the remains as those of another missing stoa, the Stoa of the Herms. The identification as the Poikile rests first on Pausanias (1.14−15), who described it during his visit to Athens in ca. 150 AD. After referring to the Hephaisteion as being on the hill above the Royal Stoa, he describes in order a sanctuary of Aphrodite Ourania, a gate carrying a trophy of the Athenian cavalry over the Macedonians and the Stoa Poikile. He then moves on to describe a series of monuments which lies to the E, under mod. Plaka. We have the sequence of monuments noted by Pausanias: sanctuary, gate and stoa, in the order in which he saw them, moving towards the E. The archaeological evidence corresponds to what we know from other anc. sources (Agora III, nos 47−98) concerning the history of the stoa. It was built at the time of Kimon’s ascendancy, that is in the 470s or 460s BC, and it survived until L antiquity, at least until the time of the Bishop Synesius, who saw the building (though not the paintings) in the years around AD 400. Pottery found against the foundations and under the floor at the W indicates a construction date around 470 BC and the building certainly stood until the 6th Ct AD. Finally, the numerous anc. references (50) indicate that the Poikile was a well-known and prominent building, used for a variety of public functions. The present remains of a large stoa (over 44m) facing S, overlooking the Agora square and the Acropolis, correspond to such prominence. The Stoa of the Herms seems also to have been standing in the 5th Ct BC, at the time of Kimon (Aeschines III, 183−85), and it is referred to in several Hel inscriptions. Pausanias does not describe it, however, nor does it appear in any source of the Rom period, leaving open the possibility that it did not survive the siege of Sulla in 86 BC, in which case the archaeological evidence for our stoa would not match the history of the Stoa of the Herms.

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Thorikos. R. Laffineur (Belgian School/Liège) reports that a topographic plan of the Myc necropolis on the Velatouri hill has been completed, giving a complete record of all tombs. Between the peribolos wall of tomb V and the group of 2 upright stones of prassinite on the SE, a stone (now moved to the Laurion Museum) was found which the excavator interprets as having inscribed Linear B numerals upon it. To the SW of the Myc necropolis, on the NW slope of the Great Velatouri, 4 squares were opened. In square G56b8, intentionally placed stones suggest a tomb which remained either unused or was emptied in a later phase (thus explaining the absence of almost all material). Alongside the N section of square G56a8, a rich inhumation of the LGeo period was identified (Fig. 1).  A cylindrical pit was dug deep into the natural bedrock and is related to a small platform upslope, bordered by a flat stone on the SE. Reddened earth and charcoal from atop the platform suggest a ritual funerary installation. A large amphora decorated with lines and horizontal bands in a washy paint contained bone and teeth fragments, whitened by incineration. Between the platform and the shoulder of the amphora, a black-painted cup and a pyxis were found, decorated with zones of lines and meanders (Fig. 2).  A bronze fibula was found in the filling of the cylindrical pit, and a gold ring shaped as a simple ribbon was deposited at the bottom. Cleaning took place at the Thorikos settlement and industrial quarter under the direction of R. Docter (Ghent) and P. Iossif (Belgian School). The area to be cleaned was restricted to the E sector of the settlement. Work on the ‘industrial’ road revealed traces of chariot wheels.  A lekythos was found in SW corner of room E of the oikos, probably coming from the lower part of the wall.  Fieldwork continued in the W sector of the shrine of Hygeia and to the S of the Street of the Herms. Particular attention was given to the cleaning of washery 1, cistern AO, the settling tanks and to the ergasteria of the surrounding area.

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Voula. Y. Kourayos (ΚΣτ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the results of rescue excavation of ca. 0.6ha undertaken between 2005 and March 2007 on a plot owned by  the Sklavenitis brothers on Mystras and Athinais streets, by Vari avenue. Important architectural remains of the Cl period (L5th-E4th Ct BC) probably belong to the Agora of the anc. deme of Halai Aixonides. A large rectangular building complex, ca. 1,500m2, comprised 12 rooms of varying sizes grouped around a square courtyard. The greater part of the structure is founded on bedrock. Within the courtyard, a 2.5m d. round cistern, cut into the rock, supplied water to the complex. One of the rooms, which was divided into an antechamber and a sekos, is identified as a small shrine (5 x 7m). The antechamber had a plaster floor, while that of the sekos was tiled. The identification is confirmed by the discovery of figurines, including female forms such as kourotrophoi, and a square, built altar S of the building, surrounded by a semi-circular peribolos. Beside the entrance to the shrine, a further large space which was probably the associated dining room.    The complex is surrounded to the N by a large rectangular peribolos 22 x 17m, which continues under a neighbouring plot and which must have been an important public building (perhaps a courtyard since no architectural members were found in the interior). Towards the E was a well-built rectangular well, and an entrance leading directly into the central courtyard of the complex. In addition, in the NW corner of the building plot, part of the anc. arterial road leading to the temple of Apollo Zoster was uncovered (a further part was located on an adjacent plot to the N in 1987). This is 25m w., with the retaining wall well preserved. Excavation produced a large quantity of pottery which awaits conservation, and a hoard of bronze coins of various cities (including, Athens, Aigina, Hermione, Thebes, Corinth, and Salamis) as well as 2 silver coins. The most significant coin find was a silver tetradrachm of Alexander 3rd (336-323 BC), which bears on the obverse the head of Herakles and on the reverse the enthroned Olympian Zeus.    Also significant is the discovery of 40 lead balance weights collected together in one room; unworked masses of lead indicate their manufacture on site.  Attention is drawn to one rectangular weiht with a depiction of an amphora in relief, and the inscription ΔΗΜΩ, and to a bronze plaque bearing the name ΔΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΣ ΑΛΑΙΕΥΣ. A large concentration of terracotta loom weights was found in a neighbouring room.

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Vari. A number of recent excavations around the anc. cemetery of Vari at Kaminia, between Varkiza and Vari, have brought to light a series of Myc graves. Two related walls converge towards an artificial hill which may conceal a tholos tomb.

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L. Karali-Giannakopoulou (Athens) reports on the joint Athens University/EPSNE excavations begun in 2003. The cave, situated W of Paiania, lies at an altitude of 691masl and consists of 2 main areas with a total l. of ca. 50m, w. 20m, h. 11m and d. 6m. First occupied in the E phase of the LNeo, it probably served as a shrine to Pan during Cl times, and continued to be used for seasonal habitation at least until the end of the Cl period. Finds included numerous pottery sherds from the Neo to the mod. period, fine worked lithics, animal bones and sea shells. The excavation was completed in 2007, and study continues on the archaeozoological, palaeobotanical and geomorphological evidence.

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Four Classical graves were discovered on Mesogeion avenue during the construction of the metro station of Cholargos. Two were child burials in larnakes and 2 were cist graves.

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A 3rd season of survey was carried out by Athens University (A. Papadimitriou-Grammenou, P. Georgiou-Geka and P. Petridis) on the hill of Kotroni (anc. Aphidnai) between Kapandriti and Lake Marathon. The most important architectural find has been part of a tower E of the crest of the hill. A trial trench uncovered a section of the perimeter of the tower and sherds dating from PH to Cl times.

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A. Mazarakis Ainian (ASA) reports the discovery of part of an apsidal building (Fig. 1) from the LGeo period measuring 3.4m w. and a l. so far exposed of 3.8m. In the middle of the room was a circular stone construction next to a hollow cavity containing some animal bone and fragments of drinking vessels.

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Ambelakia. In a lecture at the Museum of Cycladic Art, M. Pologiorgi (B' EΠΚΑ) reports on her excavation of 11 tombs of different types dating from the L5th or E4th Ct to the 3rd Ct BC along E. Venizelou street (on the line of the anc. road leading to the city gate). An infant interment in an amphora is illustrated. Two sarcophagi each contained a female burial with a bronze mirror, together with clay pyxides. One mirror survived intact but heavily oxidized, preserving only traces of its decoration. The other, decorated in sphyrelaton with a scene of Aphrodite(?) and an Eros, and perhaps the product of a Cor workshop, had been deliberately separated into its 2 parts and both the cover and the mirror disc used as receptacles for fruit offerings (pomegranate seeds, almonds, chestnuts, etc.). This rare example of a mirror recovered from a properly documented context provides important evidence for funerary customs, which counters commonly held views on the magical role of mirrors in graves. Finds from this excavation are held in the Salamis Archaeological Museum.

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M. Pantelidou-Gofas (ASA) reports on continued excavation of the EH cemetery (Fig. 1). In tomb 41 it was confirmed that the grave was covered by a large slab which had broken prior to any burials: the tomb had, therefore, remained unused, allowing study of the initial construction, something not possible in other tombs which had suffered interference from subsequent burials. Tomb 42 (Fig. 2) was found to be similar in form to other cist graves of Tsepi, with threshold, cairn in front of the entrance, lined cist grave and covered by 2 large slabs. The grave contained a large number of bones, pushed to the W end opposite the entrance. There were also many skulls, nearly all broken, the majority in pieces gathered together to the sides of the grave. This differs from the orderly deposition of remains from the other tombs in the S sector of the cemetery. In the E section of the grave, at a low level of the fill in front of the entrance, the skeleton of the last person buried was found and, above it, a scattering of pebbles and a few sherds. A stone 0.1m l. had been placed in the mouth and, over the chest, 3 skulls were found, together with bones, from a secondary deposit. One skull had been beaten, perhaps with a stone found next to it, the 2nd had a circular hole and only the 3rd was intact. The only grave offering was a tiny amphora with incised decoration. Consistent with findings from tombs 45 and 68, the excavator suggests that in some cases stones were thrown at the bones of the dead, sometimes damaging the cranium. In tomb 39 a trench was opened in order to establish its relationship with an area of black soil and ashes, likely a funeral pyre. Investigation was hampered by the overlying visitors’ walkway, which here is only 1.2−1.4m from the cemetery surface. Ceramic analysis continued to refine important key typologies dating the finds to the oldest phase of the site, i.e., the Chal period, a little before 3,200 BC.

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G. Poulimenos reports on a new study of the Latin phase of the katholikon. The katholikon of the monastery is redated to the E18th Ct AD (between 1718 and 1732), noting that it was founded on a previous ruined church to which a new roof and dome were added. Remains from the period of Latin (13th−14th Ct AD) as well as Byz occupation were identified. Study of the katholikon revealed a Latin church of the Romanesque Lombardish school, likely built between 1296 and 1317, the bema of which probably belonged to an earlier Byz church.

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N. Polychronakou-Sgouritsa (Athens) reports on continuing work within the Myc settlement and cemetery. In addition to the 3 Myc tombs already excavated in 1979-80, 2 more were located at a small distance to the S. One, within the mod. village cemetery, was used as an ossuary, while part of the dromos of the other, with stone-clad walls, was uncovered. Investigation of the latter tomb will be undertaken in 2008. Continuing study of finds from the area has revealed new MH−LH material, as well as material of the end of LH IIIB/LHIIIC. Examination of 3 iron artefacts in the archaeometry laboratory of NCSR Democritos shows them to be anc. and made in different technical traditions: they must be added to the very few examples from the Aegean which predate the 11th Ct BC.

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Kalaureia. B. Wells and A. Penttinen (Swedish Institute) report on the first season of the research programme, ‘The Sea, the City and the God’, at the Sanctuary of Poseidon. Objectives are: to define the extent of the sanctuary and its relationship to the polis; to study the local cults through archaeological material; to investigate the relationship of contemporary local residents to the archaeological remains and their perception of archaeologists. Two excavation areas were selected on the basis of geophysical survey conducted in 2004 and 2006: area I, close to the entrance to the site and S of building D (which had previously yielded a wealth of cult material); and area H, SE of the Temple of Poseidon. Area I yielded a large building complex, of which 4 rooms/spaces were partly investigated. Two architectural phases may be dated to the 2nd and 1st Cts BC. The collapse of roof tiles indicates ERom abandonment and subsequent slow disintegration. Objects found in the rooms hint at their function. In a room in the SW, 5 coins were found together with 2 bronze fish hooks and a number of lead sinkers from fishing nets. Broken pottery in a small compartment in one corner may have fallen from shelves. The room may have been a fish shop or a tavern. A 2nd room was used for food preparation; a grill was built in one corner, with a pit full of ash and broken cooking pots in front of it. A further room may have been a store; large fragments of jars were found together with ash and charred olive pips. The northernmost space, probably a courtyard, has yielded pottery indicative of earlier activity. It is on a level with the EIA L remains found beneath building D: an EGeo II amphora neck points to earlier presence in the area. In area H, a large level area was created during the 2nd Ct BC, with a circuit wall similar to that surrounding the temple area but of smaller dimensions. The area’s function is unclear. A LBA bronze Reshef figurine (Fig. 1) was found in the levelling fill for the peribolos: its presence in a context dating a millenium later requires further investigation. In the SE part of area H, 3 unfluted column drums, at 1.07m di. too big to form part of any known building in the sanctuary, are likely the remains of a votive column of the end of the 6th Ct BC. Two large blocks of hard dark grey limestone with mouldings and a large block of soft marl were found in the same area but some distance from each other. The dark grey blocks belong to the same monument, but all 3 pieces were probably removed for reuse in mod. buildings in the Kalaureia area. Underneath the fill for the peribolos was a cultural layer of the L8th Ct BC. EIA L pottery stratified on bedrock all over the area investigated indicated extensive activity. The 8th Ct was undoubtedly an important period in Kalaureia’s history, when the sanctuary was prominent in the Saronic Gulf area.

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Kavos Vasili. E. Konsolaki-Giannopoulou (ΚΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on excavation of an EH settlement on the N coast, facing Aigina, which is directly accessible by boat. The 3 main buildings (A, B, Γ) excavated, covering ca.40−50m2, plus 2 adjacent subsidiary structures (Δ, E), covering ca. 15−20m2, form part of a large settlement. The main buildings are oriented SE−NW, and lie in a radial arrangement towards the centre of the settlement. They are all rectangular, and have off-centre doorways with stone socles. Building A consists of a main room, an anteroom and a paved court to the E set 0.90m below ground level. A black steatite signet seal was found in the anteroom. The floor deposit contained much shattered pottery with, in the SW corner, a saddle quern and stone mortar fixed to the floor. Immediately to the E, a small structure set deep below ground (with stone steps in the S wall) was likely for food or livestock storage. Building B, 7m N of building A, has a main hall, a stone-paved porch and a small courtyard to the E. There is a clay hearth in the centre of the main room, and a bench-like structure in the NE corner. Three stone mortars were fixed to the floor and grinding tools were found in the floor deposit. An unexcavated rectangular structure was attached to the W side of building B, and to the SE, building E formed the S boundary of a triangular courtyard in front of building B. Building Γ has a stone-paved porch, and a main and a rear room. A large circular clay hearth in the main room had stamped ECyc II decoration on the flat surface of the raised rim: the deposit of ash and burnt material included a pig mandible.  A conoid clay seal was found in the rear room. The 2-roomed building Δ was a subsidiary of Γ. Two retaining walls running NE−SW lay at the W edge of the excavation. The entire settlement probably covered ca. 15ha (to judge from sherd scatter and surface architectural remains). In the unexcavated SE part, a 15m l. wall (as preserved), running E−W, may indicate a road flanked by houses. Preliminary analysis of the ceramic evidence suggests a floruit in EH II, with abandonment, perhaps following a severe earthquake, before the start of EH III. A further EH site is noted on the knoll of Kokorelli, 1,000m SE of Kavos Vasili. There is also evidence of talc mining in the area.

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Modi (Liontari). E. Konsolaki-Giannopoulou (ΚΣτ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on research on the LMyc site on the nowadays deserted island of Modi, off the E coast of Poros. Surface collections (A. Kyrou) had included Myc pottery and small bronzes, with evidence for a LCl−Hel watch-point on the N part of the island. Excavation confirmed LMyc settlement. In the W part of the island, 2 rooms of a poorly preserved structure, founded on bedrock, were excavated. On a terrace of the SE slope below the central ridge was found a 7 x 2m structure with 2 rooms: the fill contained part of a 12th Ct BC Argive pictorial krater (perhaps waiting for transhipment), plus fragmentary LH IIIB/C terracottas. A newborn infant was buried under the floor of the S room in a small casket with bone decoration. On a plateau in the SE part of the island was a large complex of at least 7 rooms: pottery in the destruction level dates to LH IIIC, but earlier levels have not yet been reached. In the surface layer here were EH sherds, a serpentine button seal of likely EBA date and a terracotta palette akin to ECyc marble examples. In the floor deposit was a miniature bronze wheel likely of LH IIIC date. Overall, the pottery assemblage consisted of coarsewares and finewares mainly dating to LH IIIC E and M, with smaller proportions of LH IIIB2 and LH IIIC L. Cretan connections are confirmed by a large transport stirrup jar and a fragment of a tripod tray: a piece of copper ingot and sheet bronze from a vessel also point to trade. Surface remains of stone structures on the terraced slopes and a  fortification wall on the W side indicate a substantial, well protected settlement. A trading role (perhaps as a maritime stop-over) is proposed. 

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  M. Petritaki (ΚΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on test excavations conducted after survey. On the property of Sirius A Ltd at Kaoumithi, surface levels produced 2 EH vessels. In the courtyard of the property of S. Voulgari, 3 robbed chamber tombs previously reported were investigated, along with one other, investigation of which was impeded by mod. structures. The dromos of tomb 2 had been remodelled: within the chamber (2.50m di.), only one pit held a few bones and the other 2 had been disturbed. The bones are estimated to represent 13 individuals (7 adults and 6 sub-adults): radiocarbon dating at NCSR Democritos gave a date range of 9th-11th Ct AD (ca. 894−1020 AD). Twenty-two iron nails were found, probably from wooden coffins or boxes, plus sheet bronze from jewellery. It seems likely that these tombs were reused for much later burials since they do not conform to known Byz types. Tombs 3 and 4 were robbed in antiquity: tomb 4 contained obsidian and an EH sherd (the only PH finds preserved). In 1975 a further, probably Myc, tomb was found nearby by P. Themelis.

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M. Petritaki (ΚΖ' ΕΠΚΑ) reports on rescue excavation on the property of Roseberry Ltd, on the promontory of Ag. Marina on the E coast, which produced evidence of Myc settlement. In the S part was a destruction level with LH IIB and IIIA1−2 pottery. Settlement remains, found at some depth a little further N, consist of a retaining wall and house walls of 2 phases − LH IIIB and LH IIIC (E and M), with a typical pottery assemblage for each phase. Two animal figures were found, as well as obsidian, animal bone and shell. Some EH II sherds were found in surface levels, including part of a clay hearth rim with zigzag decoration. A LRom−ECh use level (with pottery and coins of the 3rd−6th Ct AD) also lay close to the surface.

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Saronic Harbours Archaeological Research Project (SHARP).  D. Pullen (ASCSA/Florida) and T. Tartaron (ASCSA/ Pennsylvania) report on the first of 3 planned field seasons (Fig. 1). Research focused on the recently discovered Myc settlement at Korphos-Kalamianos, a harbour settlement with a large, planned urban centre, where the foundations and lower walls of the entire town are exposed due to extensive soil loss. An architectural inventory of construction over an area of ca. 9ha was completed: significant progress was made in high-precision mapping of the area, and 2 smaller sectors were selected for detailed architectural drawing and description. The Myc walls, including extensive segments of fortification wall, were shown to cover ca. 7.2ha (Fig. 2). At least 50 separate structures and complexes were identified, nearly all on a similar N−S grid. A large number of complexes, with 5−8 or more rooms, were built as single units. Surface survey on the Kalamianos site and in the surrounding area used 25 x 25m grid squares as ‘discovery units’ (following the methodology of the Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey). Myc buildings located within these units were examined (via artefact collections and counts) before the remaining area was walked (Fig. 3): pottery from wall fills helped to date their construction, and collections from interior spaces aimed to establish date and function. A number of discovery units were walked in the surrounding area at Kalamianos, Aramada and Stiri. Significant Myc activity was located in a saddle between 2 small hills N of Kalamianos, and at Stiri, SE of the Panagia church. In both cases, canonical cyclopean masonry of Myc type was used in complexes and buildings similar to those at Kalamianos. Ceramic finds also included FNeo, EH and LRom to EMed. Geological and geomorphological research (R. Dunn) focused on problems of erosion and sediment movement, hydrology, and coastline change over time. The 2007 season demonstrated the importance of the Korphos region as a centre in LH IIIB and probably also LH IIIA, centred on the harbour at Kalamianos. By LH IIIB Mycenae had established a strong presence in the region, using Kalamianos as an important stop in maritime routes to Attica and the Corinthia, and directly challenging the former regional power, Aigina.

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Kythera Island Project. C. Broodbank (BSA/London) and E. Kiriatzi (BSA) report on a further study season. Preliminary study of the Rom pottery (K. Slane) from the survey and the 1960s excavations at Kastri, indicates a low-level presence of ERom and high density of LRom. Notable also is the substantial presence of MRom (3rd−4th Ct AD), the possibility of some continuation after ca. 650 AD into the EByz and wide-ranging trade connections within the E Mediterranean in terms of amphorae, table and cooking wares. Study of almost all 47 sites in Paliopolis was completed, one of the most intensively investigated coastal landscapes in the Mediterranean. Study of ca. 100 thin sections of geological samples  from Kythera and S Laconia (E. Kiriatzi and R. Siddall) confirmed that the source of the red micaceous pottery, abundant on Kythera and present in a number of Peloponnesian sites during the LBA, must be on Kythera. S Laconia cannot be a source of the Lustrous Decorated Minoanising pottery present in coastal sites in the S and E Peloponnese: Kastri remains a strong candidate for at least some of this pottery while the possibility of production in the Argolid needs to be further explored. Progress was made with other specialist studies. Preparation and analysis at the Fitch Laboratory of 10% of the 299 samples of largely iron-related metallurgical material from the project’s surface collections was begun (M. Georgakopoulou). GIS research (V. Delrieu) focused on analysis of all tract densities to explore for potential site-level densities in areas not yet designated: 4 candidates were so isolated. Archival research (J. Bennet, S. Davies and D. Harlan) on the 18th Ct landholding patterns of Strapodi was conducted in conjunction with micro-toponym location by E. Kiriatzi through interviews with local informants.

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Megalo Stironisi. A shipwreck is reported with a cargo of tiles stowed in sets of 6 and tied in large piles.

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Portolafia. Two shipwrecks are reported, one carrying 2nd-3rd Ct AD Rom amphorae, probably from Pontos, and the other carrying 12th Ct AD Byz amphorae.

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Palaiogiorgi.  Ch. Koilakou (1st EBA) reports the excavation of an Early Christian church with a large apse, naves on the north and south, and a narthex on the west side. The building, which underwent a series of subsequent alterations, continued in use until the end of the 17th century.  

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Vari, Demetros and Agias Lauras Streets (Kousiaki property).Maria Kassimi-Souttou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports the discovery of a 5m-deep cistern sunk into the bedrock (1.3 x 0.8m at the mouth), with a pipe running to the mouth (both cistern and pipe lined with lime mortar). To the east, three walls and finds comprising pottery, 30 pyramidal spindle whorls and pointed amphorae toes are identified as the remains of a workshop.  To the north of the walls, an Archaic cemetery contained six pithos burials and 28 pyres. Finds include intact and broken lekythoi, sherds, and miniature vessels. The workshop postdated the cemetery and was probably positioned so as not to disturb the burials. 

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Kefissia, Aghion Theodoron and Kyriakou Streets, Municipal plot. Charikleia Koilakou (1η ΕΒΑ) reports on the discovery of graves and architectural remains. The latter were identified as the remains of the church of Aghioi Theodoroi. Four graves were excavated from the interior of the church and another 16 around it. Most graves housed multiple burials. Jewellery, crosses and pottery indicate that the cemetery was in use from the 9th to the 19th centuries.

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Charikleia Koilakou (1η ΕΒΑ) reports on the discovery of numerous Byzantine and post-Byzantine rock-cut burials, and sections of walls belonging to an enclosure. These were found adjacent to the west and north walls of the church. 

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Athens, Makrygianni plot (New Acropolis Museum). Stamatia Eleutheratou (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavation in various parts of the site (Fig. 1). 1) Another bathtub was revealed in the area between the Weiler and the Museum building (Fig. 2). This bathtub belongs to the 6th-7th c. A.D. phase of the frigidarium of the Central Bath. The frigidarium contained in total six small bathtubs. 2) The south end of House A’ (second- to sixth-century A.D.) was revealed in the area south of the Museum building. This is the only house that needed to be removed for the construction of the museum. A new, Roman to early Christian building was excavated south of this house. Its only remains are sections of its walls. A well containing 5th c. A.D. pottery lies west of these walls. Both House A’ and the Roman house were set on the remains of an early Roman foundry (1st B.C. – early 2nd A.D.). Two new casting pits were identified (pits II and III) (Fig.3). The foundry had been established over the remains of a 4th c. B.C. room. Two deposit pits, contemporary with this room, lie to its west. These contained numerous table ware and cook pots (Fig. 4). Two prehistoric, child burial containing no burial goods were found near the northwest corner of the aforementioned room (graves 69 and 70). In addition, numerous middle Helladic remains lie in the area: 2 wells, a floor, postholes and grooves. 3) The bottom of a Byzantine pithos and another two pits for pithoi were located SE of the Museum. The foundations of two walls and one pillar belonging to an Early Christian building were also found in this area. The most important discovery was a Roman (2nd – 3rd c. A.D.) complex of rooms with mosaic floors (Fig. 5). The rooms have a NE-SW orientation. A rectangular cistern was excavated south of the rooms. The cistern remains un-datable. 4) Another section of the ancient road and its drain was revealed (NMA-II). The marble torso of a youth had been reused in the construction of the drain (Fig 6). The torso dates to Roman times. 5) A 6th – 7th c. A.D. room containing kilns, tentatively interpreted as a workshop, was excavated on the west side of Makrygianni. A second room lies near it containing clay floors dated in the 3rd – 4th c. A.D. The room also preserves a door opening, which is dated in the 6th c. B.C.

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Aghios Ioannis Rentis, Piraeus Avenue 254, property of the Foundation of the Hellenic World. Charikleia Koilakou (1η ΕΒΑ) reports on the discovery of two wine presses (Fig. 1). They are rubble constructions coated with hydraulic concrete. Four construction phases were identified, indicating that the presses were in continuous use from the 11th until the 15th centuries. Other finds include plain ware, glazed sherds, 2 twelfth-century bronze coins and a bronze ear-scoop.

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Oinoe, Church of Zoodochos Pege. Charikleia Koilakou (1η ΕΒΑ) reports on the discovery of walls and cisterns in the precinct of the Church. These belong to the earlier, Byzantine phase of the church.

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Roman Agora, Tower of the Winds. Nikos Tsoniotis (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on new discoveries regarding the foundations of the tower. Specifically, the foundations consist of a marble euthynteria and two courses of aktite stone blocks. The height of both courses is 0.70 m. The lower course had been set directly on the bedrock. Additional discoveries include two terracotta pipes with a SE-NW direction (Fig. 1). One of the two pipes was of piriform shape. Finally, a section of the foundations of the Agoranomeion was revealed. The foundations run to the south of and parallel with the aforementioned pipes. They consist of poros blocks. A poros drain, with a SE-NW orientation, runs under the building. The drain is covered by conglomerate stone slabs. 

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Madrasa. Nikos Tsoniotis (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavation of the Late Roman wall inside the Madrasa. The thickness of the upper section of the fortifications was found to be 0.68 m. (Fig. 1). Red mortar was used between the course blocks and the orthostates. The lower section was constructed in the composite style. Its thickness is 0.81 m. In comparison to its exterior, the interior of the wall was not carefully constructed. 

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Plaka, 17 Tholos Street (property of H. Mauroleon). Nikos Tsoniotis (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavation in the plot. A wall was excavated which separates two rooms (Fig. 1). Room one had an earth floor. Room 2 contained a tiled floor with signs of repairs (Fig. 2). A section of the floor was plastered with rose-coloured hydraulic cement (kourasani). Pottery dating from the middle of the 3rd until the early 5th centuries A.D. was excavated from the north part of this room. In addition, few 1st c. B.C. sherds were found. The excavator identifies the rooms as a house. Based on the pottery found at its NE corner, the house is dated in the 1st c. B.C. to the 1st A.D. With respect to the π-shaped terracotta channel, which was reported found in the same plot the previous year, the excavator dates it in the 5th and 6th centuries A.D. 

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Plaka, Dioskouron Street (ΔΕΗ construction work). Nikos Tsoniotis (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of the mouth of a silo and of walls. The walls had been constructed by spolia. These include an un-fluted column drum, a large aktite-stone block, fragments of marble architectural members and poros blocks. Additional finds from the area include:  4 fragments from statues, a fragment from the crown of a stele, a fragment from an inscription, and a fragment from architectural relief sculpture. One of the statue fragments (Fig. 1) depicts part of a torso of Artemis. The excavator identifies this as a copy of a Roman classicising statue. 

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Plaka, Adrianou 80 and Diogenous 3 Streets (property of A. and N. Bogdanou). Dimitris Sourlas (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of Byzantine remains. The plot concerned is adjacent to the building identified as the Pantheon or the Panhellenion. Part of a Justinian fortification tower was revealed. The tower is preserved to a height of 5m. Its western and north sides were set on top of the Hadrianic foundations. Its north face is constructed from reused poros and marble blocks (Fig. 1). Its south side is hardly preserved. The tower appears to have been used in later periods, since there are door and window openings. Additionally, its interior preserves marks from roof beams. The joint between the tower and the fortification wall is badly preserved. The width of the wall is less than 1 m. It is constructed from poros blocks, tiles and mortar. A marble gate was excavated from the middle of the revealed section of the wall (Fig 2.). This gate was known to us from drawings and descriptions dating in the first quarter of the 20th century. The lower part of the gate had been converted into a fountain in later periods (Fig. 3). It upper part had been shut in later periods with rubble. Finally, a section of the church of Panagia Krystaliotissa was revealed.  The church preserves post-byzantine wall paintings with floral motifs. Reused marble architectural members (column bases, column capitals and column drums) were found in its apse and served as the altar (Fig. 4). 

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Athens, Acropolis south slope. S. Moschonissioti (Α’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavation in the area connecting the eastern diazoma of the theatre of Dionysus with the Peripatos. A small retaining wall (Fig 1) and Late Classical to Late Roman pottery sherds were found. In addition, two more block courses of the foundation of the theatre’s retaining wall were revealed (Fig 2). On the west side of Tripodon street (Fig 3) Late Roman to Middle Byzantine sherds were found as well as the following architectural features: 1) The soft poros foundation of a choregic monument. Its eastern side appears to have been cut during the Hellenistic or Late Roman period, in order to accommodate a pi-shaped terracotta pipe which runs through the whole trench. 2) Three Middle Byzantine pithoi. 3) A rectangular, rubble, Middle Byzantine construction. 4) Part of the foundation of possibly another choregic monument. 5) A square poros-stone base. 6) An oval-shaped terracotta pipe. The pipe stops in front of a small, rubble wall. These two features may belong to a Late Roman to Byzantine road.  

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Kaminia, Piraeus Avenue (between Zakynthou and Kastanitsis Streets). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two sections of the North Long Wall. Its remains consist of two courses of blocks. 

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Neo Phalero, Piraeus Avenue (east of Elais factory). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a section of a road and an inurned cremation of a young child. The vessel containing the cremation was globular (Fig 1). A Corinthian pan tile was used as a lid. A river pebble bearing traces of red pigment had been placed over the tile to keep it in place. Finds from inside and around the vessel include 18 pieces of iron nails, traces of gold, a silver coin and a broken iron pin preserving traces of fabric. 

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Neo Phalero, Kanellopoulou 36 and Christofi Streets (property of D. and N. Douzoglou). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a section of the South or Middle Long Wall (Figs 1, 2, 3, 4) and a rectangular tower. The tower and wall survive to a height of six and five courses respectively. The blocks bear tool marks. In the 1st-2nd c. A.D. the aforementioned remains were levelled and a road was constructed on top of them. 15 Late Roman (3rd-4th A.D.) burials were excavated west of this road: two inurned cremations (one of which is in a pointed amphora), a pyre, a shaft grave and 11 tile graves. The aforementioned road intersected a second road. Both preserved wheel ruts. A funerary colonnette in secondary use was found in the retaining wall of the second road. The 1st c. B.C. colonnette bore the following inscription: Δ α μ ά γ η τ ο ς Π ο λ υ ά ρ χ ο υ Π α ι α ν ι ε ύ ς [γ] ον ω δ ε - - ρ α γ ο υ [Ηρα] κ λεώτου Finally, the remains of a Late Roman workshop were revealed alongside the same road. The excavator dates the stretch of wall and the rectangular tower in the third phase of repairs of the Long Walls.

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Neo Phalero, Piraeus Avenue 50 (Paraschou propetry) A. Syroyanni (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Hellenistic to 2nd c. A.D. cemetery (Fig 1) north of the North Long Wall. In total 49 tile graves, 41 pit graves and 3 pyres were excavated. Some of these belonged to children of all ages and metics. Most graves contained only unguentaria. One of the few graves with additional burial offerings, grave 48 (Fig 2), contained an unguentarium, 4 intact vessels, and two inscriptions in secondary use. 

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Aghios Ioannis Rentis, 161 Piraeus Avenue and Flemming Streets (property of Jumbo A.E.) A. Syroyanni (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a road, walls and two cisterns (Figs 1, 2, 3). The remains are dated in the Classical period.

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Moschato, Korai Street 2 (property of Mela Foundation). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a road and a cemetery (Fig 1). The road preserved its retaining walls on both sides and headed towards the road which runs parallel to the South Long Wall. The road appears to have been in use from the Geometric to the Byzantine period. A cemetery with Geometric and Classical burials is found on both sides of the road. 15 burials were excavated: 3 shaft graves, 5 tile graves, 4 in-urned cremations, 1 pyre and two terracotta larnakes. 

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Moschato, Eugenias Street 13 (O.T. 85 property of A. Tahtatzi). A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a niche, a cauldron and a wall (Fig 1). A square, poros niche with a marble slab at its top was excavated. A bronze cauldron containing ashes and a small Classical alabastron had been placed in a hole at the centre of the niche (Fig 2). The cauldron is in a bad state of preservation and is dated in the late Archaic/early Classical period (500-470 B.C.). The wall dates in the Classical period and is interpreted as the enclosure of a cemetery (Fig 3).

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Moschato, 7 Piraeus Avenue (O.T. 229-234-234-236, property of KARENTA AE). A-M Anagnostopoulou and M. Raftopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a two-phase building with a SW-NE orientation (Fig 1). The earlier-phase building (building B) measures 5.50x8.60 m., had a stone-built superstructure and an entrance at its south side. Its stone threshold is preserved in situ. The later-phase building (building A) measures 7.35x5.50 m. and its superstructure was not preserved. The excavators consider the possibility of this building having been unroofed. Its entrance was at its south, long side, directly over the entrance of building B. An altar-like structure was excavated at a small distance from the building’s entrance. An undecorated poros stele was found NE of the ‘altar’. Finally, two monolithic pillars, interpreted by the excavators as horoi, were found at the east part of the plot. All the aforementioned finds lie on the same axis as the entrance of the building. Pottery sherds date the two building phases in the Archaic and Classical periods respectively. The function the building served remains largely indeterminate due to the lack of any characteristic small finds.

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Tavros, 25th of Martiou, Thessalonikis and Teo Streets (property of Lidl Hellas and Co.). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Classical building with a N-S orientation. The building consists of four rooms and contained numerous small finds indicating a period of use from the late 5th c. B.C. until Roman times. Room 4 contained a destruction layer with late 5th-early 4th c. B.C. pottery sherds. Some of these sherds belong to 10 red-figure lekythoi. The function of the building is unknown. Finally, a road was excavated to its south. 

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Keratsini, Karaoli Demetriou 114 and Afxentiou Pallikaridi (property of B. Roussos and K Kaskanis). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of Early Helladic walls. The walls may belong to the Early Helladic settlement discovered by Mpakalakis’ (AE 1933, 6-8) on the slopes of Aghios Georgios hill.

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Keratsini, DEH works (Gkionas and Kissavou Streets and Demokratias Avenue). M. Petritaki (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of five burials on Gkionas and Kissavou Streets: three pyres and two shaft graves. Both pyres had a circular shape. Shaft grave I was rock-cut and included skeletal remains from 11 consecutive burials, seven coins and two Late Roman pots. Shaft grave II was also rock-cut and contained few bones and pottery sherds. An apsidal building was found on Demokratias Avenue 182. It had a mortar floor and its walls were constructed from bricks, rubble and mortar. Wall remains were revealed in the area around the building. The latter is dated in early Christian times. Its use, however, cannot be determined. 

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Glyfada, Artemidos and Themistokleous Streets (O.T. 241, property of Tsamparlidi). B. Antonopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of 17 burials: 8 inurned cremations, 6 pyres and 3 shaft graves (Fig 1). All burials contained votive offerings: primarily black-figure lekythoi and black-glazed pots (skyphoi, pyxides, lekanes, olpes). Pointed amphorae, a pithos, a situla, a cooking pot and an amphora by the Lydos painter (Fig 2) had been used for the inurned cremations. Few bones were found in the pyres. Apart from these the pyres contained bronze artefacts and olive pits. The latter could have come from the firewood used for the pyres. The burials are dated in the second half of the 6th – first quarter of the 5th c. B.C. Finally, shallow rock-cuts point to a later use of the area for manufacturing or agricultural purposes. 

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Glyfada, Aristofanous and Alkiviadou Streets (alleged property of Sklavounou). B. Antonopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of three rubble walls belonging to an agricultural facility. The rock the walls had been built on bore tool marks indicative of quarrying. Few classical pottery sherds were retrieved from the area. 

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Glyfada, 10 Poseidonos Street (O.T. 428, property of I. Tsoukala). B. Antonopoulou (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Classical road (Fig 1). The road had retaining walls on both sides.

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Voula, 117 Vouliagmenis Avenue (O.T. 123, property of Y. and M. Kotzayanni). L. Makradema, Y. Kouragios and M. Giamalidi (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of part of a Classical house. Specifically, two rooms were excavated which communicated via a corridor (Fig 1). The rooms were of a rectangular and square shape respectively, and each had two doors. A drain ran through the rectangular room (Fig 2). The complex’s rubble walls had been founded on the natural rock. The house appears to have operated from the late 5th until the late 4th c. B.C. The house lies within the boundaries of the deme of Halai Aixonidai. Small finds include plain ware, storage vessels, few black-glazed sherds and loom weights. 

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Voula, Varis Avenue, and Mystra and Athinaidos Streets (O.T. 164, property of Sklaveniti Bros.). L. Makradema, Y. Kouragios and M. Giamalidi (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a large Classical complex in the deme of Halai Aixonidai. This consists of a large, central courtyard surrounded by 9 rooms of various sizes. The complex is enclosed by walls which delineate gardens and grazing land (Figs 1, 2). The main entrance lies east, where a cistern was also found. All rooms had walls from local limestone and beaten earth floors. A bipartite room from the complex’s west side is identified as a temple. It had an east-west orientation and was entered from the central courtyard. The cella had a terracotta tile floor. Only the base survived from the cella’s central column, which supported a saddle roof. The adyton had a mortar floor. A square, stone altar lies west of the temple. Finds from this room include 3 terracotta figurines of female forms (a kourotrofos, a figure seated on a rock, and a standing figure). Several plain ware vessels (cooking pots, jars, plates, amphorae) were found in the room west of the temple. The finds indicate that the room served as a kitchen. A tower-like building lies at the south side of the courtyard. This building resembles other towers excavated in the deme, which had been used for the safekeeping of harvested produce. 27 coins were excavated from a room at the east side of the courtyard. Two of these are silver (one Athenian and one from Kolophon). The remaining coins come from Athens, Aegina, Salamis, Korinth, Megara, Hermione and Phthiotida, and date in the 4th c. B.C. Additional small finds from the complex include a bronze plate with the inscription ΔΙΟΝΥΣΙ ΑΛΑΙΕΥΣ, a lead weight with an amphora and the inscription ΔΗΜΩ (Fig 3), plain ware sherds, storage vessels, black glazed tableware, sherds from beehives, lamps, lead strainers, iron tools, copper hooks and nails, piriform spindle whorls, and 43 conical lead weights. The complex is adjacent to the deme’s habitation area and next to the deme’s main road that led to the sanctuary of Apollo Zoster. Based on its location and the excavated finds, the complex is identified as either the deme’s agora or a large agro-pastoral facility which traded with various city-states. 

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Voula, Vasileos Paulou, Aulonos and Plastera Streets (O.T. 177, alleged property of I. Tsigos – A Tsigos – D. Tsigos Co.). L. Makradema, Y. Kouragios and M. Giamalidi (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a cemetery. 28 burials were found: a poros sarcophagus, a tile grave, 2 inurned cremations and 24 pyres. The sarcophagus appears to have been looted in ancient times. The richest burial, which belonged to a child, was one of the inurned cremations. A pithos had been used for the burial. 17 vessels (skyphoi, miniature lekythoi and one feeding bottle) were found around the pithos. An olpe had been used for the second inurned cremation. The pyres were organized in clusters of 2 to 4 each and the finds from these include 66 intact and broken vessels, bones, metal nails, pieces from bronze objects, and two funerary stelai. One of the latter reads: ΘΕΟΔΩΡΙΔΗΣ ΚΛΕΑΡΙΣΤΗ... ..............................ΣΤΡΑΤΟΝ The cemetery lies on the ancient road that connected the Attic coastal demes. 

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Voula, 8 Daidalou St. (O.T. 154A, alleged property of Laios). L. Makradema, Y. Kouragios and M. Giamalidi (ΚΣΤ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a monumental Classical building. It measures 10.50x9 m. and its walls are carefully constructed. A row of 3 poros columns runs in the centre and along the long axis of the building. The entrance is on the SW. Small finds include few plain ware and a coin hoard which had been placed in a lamp. The lamp was found in the foundation trench of one of the walls and the hoard consists of 32 Athenian tetradrachms. Part of a second building was excavated south of the first one. The buildings’ function remains indeterminate. 

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Athens, Mets, 14-18 Karea and 5 Razikotzika Streets. S. Asimakopoulou and N. Sakka (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a Late Classical house and a Late Roman building (Fig 1). The area belonged to either the ancient deme of Diomeia or of Alopeke. The house dates in the last quarter of the 4th c. B.C. and consisted of five rooms. It contains a hearth and a built bench, while the floors are not preserved. The walls are 0.40-0.50 cm. thick (Orlandos 1994: 217-219). A piriform cistern, a shaft and a well were excavated N of the house. The well contained numerous 12th-13th c. A.D. sherds. The area remained uninhabited after the destruction of the Late Classical house. It was only rebuilt in Late Roman times, since two rooms attest to this later building phase. Finally, seven, excavated rock-cut pits are interpreted as graves predating the Late Classical house. S. Asimakopoulou, A. Vasilakopoulou and N. Sakka (supervision) took part in the excavation.

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Athens, Koukaki, 83 Beikou St. Ai. Karkani and Ch. Charami (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of Submycenaean to early Geometric burials (Fig 1). Burial I: Shaft grave containing 2 shells, a jug, an oinochoe and an amphoriskos. Burial II (Fig 2): Cist grave containing three Little Master cups, an iron pin, a miniature oinochoe and a red bead. Burial III: Cist grave containing a Little Master cup and a miniature oinochoe. Burials IV and VI: Shaft graves with no votive offerings Burial V: Shaft grave containing a trefoil-lipped oinochoe, a kylix, a miniature oinochoe, 2 amphoriskoi and few organic remains (bones, part of the cranium). Burial VII: Large pit containing two inurned cremations. The first cremation had been placed in an amphora with a skyphos as a lid. The second had been placed in a pointed amphora. In addition to the graves, two circular pits were excavated. One of these contained a cooking pot.

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Athens, 84 Demosthenous St. L. Panagopoulou-Roka (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Roman to Late Roman building and a kiln (Figs 1, 2, 3). The walls excavated had been constructed with rubble stones, poros stones and spolia. The building attests to three construction phases dating from Roman times to the 3rd c. A.D. The kiln attests to two phases of use. Even though the earlier phase coincides with that of the building, the kiln appears to have stayed in use after the abandonment of the latter (3rd c. A.D.) until Late Roman times. The kiln was used for firing tiles. 

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Athens, Kerameikos, 36-40 Thermopylon and Leonidou Streets (O.T. 21, alleged property of the Municipality of Athens) T. Kokkoliou (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of the remains of a workshop: walls, a cistern, a well and two drains. The walls and drains are Classical, since numerous Classical sherds and two bronze coins were found in their vicinity. The well contained roof tiles, fragments from pointed amphorae, sherds from pithoi, beehive sherds, table ware, black glazed plates, kantharoi, lamps, skyphoi and kraters. The cistern had been plastered with hydraulic concrete. Additional finds from the area include 1 bronze coin, 1 spindle whorl, 3 skyphoi, 1 kantharos, 1 miniature skyphos, 1 kylix, a black-glazed lamp and 16 loom weights. The latter date in Classical and Hellenistic times. The excavation notebook was kept by the archaeologist A. Souliou at the expense of the Municipality, under the supervision of T. Kokkoliou.

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Athens, 7 Monastiriou St. Ch. Stoupa (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on excavation to the east of the road to the Demosion Sema. Ten burials, 2 pedestals, 4 deposit pits, a drain and a well were found (Figs 1, 2). The earliest burial is a Classical pyre containing sherds, loom weights and an animal figurine. The remaining burials date in Roman times and consist of tile graves and 1 inurned cremation. Both pedestals are rectangular in shape and date in Roman times (Fig 3). The deposit pits contained Archaic, late Classical and Hellenistic sherds: black-glazed, table ware, lekythoi, lamps and black-figure. Five walls were also excavated which belong to a funerary peribolos. Finally, the well and drain date in the Classical period. 

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Athens, 43 Vassilikon St. Ch. Stoupa (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on excavations at the Demosion Sema. Two pedestals, five burials and parts of a peribolos were found (Fig 1). Pedestal 1 was rectangular in shape and marked an inurned cremation. The vessel containing the ashes was a marble calyx crater with relief decoration depicting dancing maenads or graces and a drunken male form supported by a satyr (Fig 2). The vessel is dated in the transitional period between Hellenistic and Roman times. The dating is assisted by an undecorated oinochoe, which was found beside the burial (Fig 3). Pedestal 2 dates in the 4th c. B.C. Its NW part was destroyed by a Roman cist grave. The latter contained two gold leaves and gold fibers. The remaining burials include two more cist graves and a sarcophagus. Finally, two wells dating in Roman times were found.

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Athens, 18-20 Pierias St. Ch. Stoupa (Γ’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on excavation to the northeast of the Demosion Sema. Four Classical burials (1 cist grave, 1 tile grave and 2 terracotta larnakes), a pyre and possibly an inurned cremation were found. Classical cist grave (Fig 1): The skeleton is tentatively identified as female. The burial offerings include 4 white-ground lekythoi, a black-glazed squat lekythos, 2 miniature vessels, a bronze needle and a bronze ring. Classical terracotta larnakes (Fig 2): They contained child burials. One of the two also contained a black-glazed Little Master Cup and a miniature black-glazed phialidio. Finally, a stone pile was excavated which contained numerous sherds, charcoal and a pyramidal loom weight. A fragment from a funerary colonnette was found in the area.

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Athens, Kifissia, 313 Kifissias Avenue (O.T. 167, property of Trakosaris and Apostolopoulos Co.). A. Hatzidimitriou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discoveries of Classical houses, a Roman burial and a Late Roman storeroom. The area was inhabited from the first half of the 4th c. B.C. until the second half of the 4th c. A.D. The following remains attest to habitation in the Classical period: 2 rock-cut pits, part of a floor and two walls. A Roman female burial was also found: a pit grave containing a bronze mirror, part of a bronze pin and three glass unguentaria (Figs 1, 2). The burial dates in the 1st-2nd c. A.D. Finally, a Late Roman storeroom was found. Finds from the area include sherds with geometric decoration, plain ware, black- and red-glazed sherds (4th c. B.C.), pyramidal loom weights, sherds dating in the 2nd-4th A.D., 4th-8th A.D. and second half of the 12th A.D., 7 obsidian blades, 20 bronze coins, a coin depicting Emperor Antonian (3rd A.D.), 2 pieces from a bronze fibula, an earring, the head from a 4th c. A.D. female statuette  ('Head of Matronae', see Agora 1971: 11), a fragment from a terracotta phallus and a piece from an iron agricultural tool.

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Athens, Anoixi, Kritis St. A. Hatzidimitriou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Late Geometric burial of a female. The shaft grave contained jewelry and 32 intact vessels. These include oinochoae (Fig 1), skyphoi, 2 aryballoi (Fig 2), three plates (Fig 3), and five pyxides whose lids are either decorated with terracotta horses (Fig 4) or have handles. One of the pyxides depicts a circle dance (Fig 5). The jewellery includes a gold hair ring, 2 bronze armlets and two silver fibulae. Finally, part of a kiln, a floor, a wall, and a fragment of an unfluted column dating in the Late Classical period were found. The excavation was carried out by the contract archaeologist P. Christakou, under the supervision of D. Palaiologou and M. Stephanopoulou.

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Athens, Vrilissia, Thrakis and Analepseos Streets (O.T. 186 and 187). Th. Tzaferi (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discoveries of Roman architectural remains and a Roman burial. The area belonged to the ancient deme of Phlya. 5 walls were found (Fig 2) and a large circular boulder which could have been used as a threshold (Fig 1). The remains are identified as an agricultural facility. The burial was a tile grave with no burial offerings (Fig 3).

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Athens, Vrilissia, Thrakis and Thessalia Streets (O.T. 181 and 182). Th. Tzaferi (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two 5th c. B.C. burials (480-470 B.C.). The first had been placed in a pithos which was shut with a stone slab. It contained a black-figure lekythos depicting women possibly running, a black-glazed olpe, an intact salt cellar and an intact skyphos decorated with palmettes. The second burial had been placed in a terracotta larnax (Fig 1), which also contained an intact black-figure lekythos, a black-glazed skyphos, and an intact, miniature exaleiptron.

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Athens, Gerakas, Kentro, Skiathou, Kimolou, Anafis and Herakleias Streets (O.T. 263, property of OSK). D. Christodoulou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an extensive Roman farmstead (Fig 1). In total 41 walls were excavated which delimit 21 rooms. With the exception of a room paved with stone slabs (most likely a courtyard) and another with a lime-plaster floor, all rooms had earthen floors. The following were found in the rooms: a fragment from a funerary stele with a palmette, a bronze coin, a furnace (pieces of querns had been used for its construction), an intact storage vessel, pieces from a marble perirrhanterion, 2 hearths containing burnt vessels, a terracotta pipe, coins, querns and the head of a female statuette. In addition, three deposits were found in the complex. The area appears to have been in use throughout Roman times until the Early Byzantine period. All pottery excavated from the farmstead comes from plain ware and dates in the Roman period. The pottery excavated from the deposits is primarily fine ware and black-glazed sherds. This may indicate that the farmstead had two phases of use, one in 1st B.C.-1st A.D. and the second in the 3rd-6th c. A.D. 

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Athens, Gerakas, Kentro, Gargettou St.  (O.T. 689, property of S. Polydorou). D. Christodoulou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Late Classical farmstead (Figs 1, 2, 3). Its walls have carefully laid stone foundations and mud-brick superstructure. Its floors are of beaten earth. A well was found in the courtyard. Two fragments from a stone sarcophagus had been used as construction material (Fig 4). The rooms were entered via the NE side of the courtyard. A structure is tentatively identified as a staircase. It is unclear whether there was a second floor. If there was one, then it only extended over part of the farmstead. A small, schematic figurine of a female form missing its head was found in the area identified as the staircase. Finds from one of the rooms include loom weights, sherds from plain ware and three shallow basins (one of which was found at the entrance of one of the rooms). The mouth of a pithos or a well was found in another room, which could have been the farmstead’s storeroom. Two deposits were excavated north of the farmstead. They contained fragments from pithoi, lead clamps, loom weights, sherds from fine ware and plain ware, shells and charcoal. Some of the sherds are decorated with palmettes, lotus flowers, rosettes and other motifs. Two bronze coins with the head of Athena were found west of the deposits. A structure for the containment of water was found near the farmstead. It consisted of two, parallel retaining walls. Few finds were excavated from between the walls, while numerous destruction layers were found outside of these. The destruction layers contained sherds from plain ware, basins, pointed amphorae, table ware and cooking pots. Finally a pi-shaped structure was found. It could have been a deposit, since numerous pottery sherds were found in it (pointed amphorae, handles with stamps, sherds with comb decoration and an unguentarium with traces of black paint). 

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Peukakia, 539 Mesogeion Avenue (O.T. 337, Property of G. and S. Kostopoulos and Co.) D. Christodoulou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Byzantine house. It was excavated by the 1st EBA. It attests to two construction phases. 8 walls and scarce remains of floors were found. Its walls were constructed from mud-brick.

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Kantza, Leontariou, A. Kampa and Phaethontos Streets (O.T. 1, property of R.E.D.S. Co). D. Christodoulou (B’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discoveries of a building, a rock-cut pit and a road (Fig 1). 6 walls were found, which were constructed either from roughly worked stones or stones and bricks. The walls attest to two construction phases. A kiln was found in one of the rooms. Signs of burning were preserved in its interior. The kiln contained sherds from fine ware, iron nails, iron and lead lumps, and a silver Athenian coin with an owl. A destruction layer extended around the kiln. The layer contained numerous pottery sherds (cups, lamps, unguentaria, skyphoi, bowls, etc), iron and lead artefacts and two bronze coins. Part of a lime plaster floor was also revealed. Finally, an ancient road was found SW of the building.

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Glyka Nera, Phouresi, 11 Aiolou Street, (property of Eu. Panagopoulou). E. Brettou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the excavation of a Mycenaean Chamber tomb.  It was oriented E-W, with the entrance to the E. The dromos was 2.4 metres long and had one step. Only few sherds from drinking vessels were found on it. The entrance to the tomb had been sealed with a dry-stone wall. Rock-cut pillars stood on either side of the entrance. The latter measures 0.93 m. in height and 0.57 m. in width. No bones were found in the small ellipsoidal chamber. It nevertheless appears that the body had been placed in the centre of the chamber. Only few, small votive offerings were found: a miniature amphora, a stirrup jar, a Psi figurine and a miniature skyphos (Fig 1). The tomb dates in the 13th B.C. 

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Acharnai, Ag. Triados Square, Aristotelous and Ag. Triados Streets (Raindrop Municipality Project). M. Platonos and G. Panousopoulos (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discoveries of 22 burials, 12 silos and 2 buildings (Fig 1). 21 tile graves and 1 pit grave were found. Burial 1 (Fig 2) was a tile grave and contained two skeletons, a part of a vessel and an iron fibula. Burial 4 (Fig 3) was a pit grave and contained two skeletons, an additional cranium, a glass sherd and a black-glazed sherd. Burial 5 was a tile grave and contained 2 bronze coins, and undecorated and glazed sherds. The remaining burials contained no offerings. The circular silos (Figs 4, 5) were constructed with rubble stones, tiles and mortar and had mortar-lined interiors. Most of them contained Byzantine sherds.  Additional finds include human and animal bones, black-glazed sherds, roof-tiles, a loom weight and an obsidian blade. Building 1 (Fig 7) consisted of one room, which contained Byzantine sherds, roof-tiles, a fragment from a beehive and animal bones. The walls were constructed with rubble stones and mud. A bronze coin (1245-1278) and the base of a glass vessel were found in its vicinity.  Building 2 (Fig 8) consisted of two rooms and a corridor. It was constructed with rubble stones and bricks. Room A contained bones, roof-tiles, sherds from plain ware, glazed and black-glazed sherds, fragments from pithoi, a fragment from a cooking pot, glass sherds, a bronze coin, and an obsidian blade. A fragment from a marble funerary colonnette had been used as construction material for one of its walls. Its floor was made of beaten earth whilst tiles were found in front of its entrance. It appears that the door led to a paved courtyard (Room 2). Glazed sherds and sherds from plain ware were found by the door connecting the two rooms.  Finally, a well was found (Fig 6). It had rock-cut steps on its walls to allow access for the cleaning of its interior. It contained a terracotta pyramidal loom weight and numerous Classical sherds. 

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Acharnai, Aghios Petros, Ag. Petrou and 146 Heroon Polytechneiou Streets (O.T. 673, property of TEMKA – A. Papathanasiou) M. Platonos and G. Panousopoulos (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) report on the discovery of a Roman building (Fig 1). The excavation was conducted by Th. Georgousopoulou. In total 7 walls were found which delimit three spaces (Fig 2). The first is a cistern, while the other two are rooms. All walls are constructed with rubble stones and mortar, and two of them attest to a second construction phase (Fig 3). The cistern was lined with hydraulic concrete (Fig 4). It contained roof-tiles, Roman sherds and bones. Its floor was lined with hydraulic concrete as well, while tiles were found below it. A settling basin was found in the middle of the room (Fig 5). The second space is identified as a room. Part of its floor was lined with hydraulic concrete. Roman plain ware and a Byzantine sherd were found in it. A silo was also found in this room (Fig 6). It contained plain ware sherds, and numerous shells and snails. The third space contained few Roman sherds. Finally, a rock-cut silo was found NE of the building. It contained plain ware sherds and few bones.

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Acharnai, 21 Salaminos St. (O.T. 66, property of K. Trivellas) M. Platonos (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of the theatre of the ancient deme of Acharnai (Fig. 1). Parts of three seating sections (kerkides) were excavated (Fig 3). The middle one (Fig 2) is 5 m. wide at its west side and 22 m. at its east. 10 rows of seats are preserved. The seating area is constructed with rectangular stone boulders. The middle kerkis is built on stone foundations, while the other two on a backfill. The boulders were worked in situ. The seats are 0.20-0.44 m. wide, while the distance between them is 0.37-0.54 m. (Fig 4). The diazoma behind the prohedria is 1.20 m. wide. A thick layer of roof-tiles and Roman sherds was found on it (Fig 5). The upper diazoma is 2.15 m. wide. Part of the orchestra was also found. It was paved with gravel. Marble fragments, which may belong to the thrones of the prohedria, were found in the orchestra. The south stairway (klimaka) preserves two steps of stones and beaten earth. The north klimaka could have been a ramp with no steps. The epitheatro could have been wooden and is not preserved. Finds from the area include prehistoric sherds, roof-tiles, obsidian blades, 12 bronze coins and few loom weights. The theatre was founded on a prehistoric site. Few sherds (a fragment from a salt cellar and a black-glazed lamp) attest to the use of the area in the 5th c. B.C. The theatre was constructed in the 4th c. B.C. and remained in use until Early Roman times. The area was used again in the Frankish period and the 19th c. 

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Acharnai, Railway Station, Dimokratias Avenue. M. Platonos (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of an extensive Classical cemetery as well as two roads (Fig 1). The excavations were conducted by E. Asimakopoulou, St. Katsandre, G. Paraskeuopoulou, Ch. Lioga, G. Charitos, P. Demetra, Eu. Xatzi, Th. Georgopoulo, K. Kalompatsou, and Ch. Papanastasiou. The drawings are by A. Benekou. The finds were treated by E. Kapralou, D. Dimitrakopoulou and Ch. Kanaki. The first of the two roads has a NW-SE orientation and the second a N-S one (Fig 2). Both attest to three phases of construction in the Classical period and had retaining walls on both sides. The peribolos of the cemetery also functioned as part of the retaining wall of the first road. The cemetery: A large peribolos enclosed 108 burials. These include 5 marble sarcophagi (Fig 6), 1 marble kalpe containing alabaster alabastra (Fig 3), 2 pit graves, 3 cist graves, 73 pyres, 1 stone box containing a bronze cauldron with ashes (Fig 4), 1 terracotta larnax with a rich female burial, 4 tile graves, and 18 inurned cremations (Fig 9). Of the latter one was placed in a black-figure amphora with the inscription Νικίας ἐποίησεν (Fig 7), and another in a bronze kalpe which was then put in a lekanis (Fig 10). The burial offerings include a miniature lekanis with a lid containing unguentaria, miniature amphorae, a miniature Panathenaic amphora (Fig 5), a miniature terracotta kalpis, a ballot bead from glass paste, a bronze mirror, a ring, white ground and black-figure lekythoi, squat lekythoi, a terracotta figurine of a kourotrophos (Fig 8), glass unguentaria and alabaster alabastra. Numerous other finds were retrieved from the spaces between the burials. These include funerary vessels dating in the late 6th and 5th c. (black-glazed and black-figure lekythoi, plates, animal figurines, a red-figure loutrophoros), the figurine of a seated female form, bronze mirrors, unguentaria, an iron knife, phialidia, pyxides, skyphoi, a miniature lamp, a hydria, a stick, an alabastron and two marble lekythoi. Most burials date in the 5th c. Nevertheless, few finds date in the 6th and 7th centuries B.C. A u-shaped clay channel (preserved length 28.5 m) was uncovered in a plot in Mornou St (Fig. 11).

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Koropi, Heras and Stergioti Streets (O.T. 300, property of Ch. Papachristou), Thanou and Stergioti Streets, and Lekka-Hatzi and Thanou Streets (O.T. 299, property of A. Kakoimami) E. Andrikou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on further excavations at the EH settlement in Koropi. In the first property a road was found with carefully constructed retaining walls on both sides (Figs 1, 2). The road was paved with gravel and yellow compact soil. It has a N-S orientation and ends in an open space paved with the same material. A second road runs westwards from the open space. A drain and a pit filled with pottery, stone querns and animal bones were found below the floor of the open space. Buildings were found on both sides of the road. Two phases of construction are discernible. The walls belonging to the later phase have a N-S orientation, while the ones belonging to the earlier phase a NE-SW one. All walls had been constructed with small and medium size stones. A horseshoe-shaped construction was also found. A bench runs along its interior. Numerous funnel-shaped pits (built and rock-cut) were found amongst the building remains. Finally, small finds retrieved from the area include EHII pottery sherds, animal bones, obsidian blades and cores, bone and stone tools, querns and grindstones, terracotta pyramidal loom weights, terracotta cores for tools, stone vessels, terracotta animal figurines and one schematic human figurine. Another road and more building remains were found in the next two properties (Fig 3, 4, 5). The road has a NW-SE orientation and is paved with a compact off-white material. Trapezoid and rectangular buildings were found on both sides of this road. One of the trapezoid buildings was adjacent to the road and one of its walls formed part of the road’s retaining wall. It had pilasters on either side of its entrance. Another trapezoid building contained a stone bench, a circular structure at its centre, and two funnel-shaped pits. A closed vessel was found in the circular structure. Additional structures in the area include a shallow circular pit, a wall with a herringbone pattern, an arched stone structure whose purpose cannot be defined, and a well. Similar small finds to the previous property were retrieved with the additions of a bronze knife, a marble head from a figurine, a steatite phiale, and a Neolithic terracotta figurine of a seated female form. 

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Keratea, Small Business Park (VIOPA). A. Ntova (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on excavations in VIOPA. The latter extends over a 1,300-stremmata (130 ha) area (P. Michailidou et al. 2010). Numerous trenches were dug in several places within VIOPA and the following were revealed (Fig 1): Early Helladic settlement: A road was found with retaining walls on both sides (Fig 3). It was paved with a compact yellowish material and two circular pits had been carefully cut in its surface. A circular building divided in two by an internal wall was found east of this road. Other remains from this period include walls, pits, stone-paved areas, floors and foundations of houses, and cairns (Figs 2, 4). Based on the walls it appears that the settlement was subdivided into sections. Strong walls on the sides of the foot and the top of the hill delimited the settlement. Numerous EH sherds were found along with obsidian cores and blades, stone tools, shells, a marble head from a figurine, and numerous lumps of litharge. The latter indicate that metallurgical activities took place in the area. Mycenaean remains: These were found near the EH settlement and consist of walls, rectangular and circular pits, and a drain (Fig 5). The remains are interpreted as a workshop. Pottery sherds, stone tools and the head from a terracotta figurine were found. Ancient roads: Four ancient roads were found. An oval pit was excavated next to one of the roads. It contained undecorated and black-glazed sherds, and the neck of a Geometric amphora decorated with a meander band, a wheel and a horse. Classical-Hellenistic Farmsteads: Parts of 7 farmsteads/buildings were found. One of them was constructed on earlier wall remains and had floors of reddish earth. The in-urned cremation of a young child was found close to it. A miniature skyphos and a kotyle were found with the burial. Another farmstead was found near one of the aforementioned roads (Fig 6). It consists of 11 rooms set around a rectangular courtyard. A third farmstead consisted of a minimum of 13 rooms and dated in the 4th c. Three Geometric burials and one of the aforementioned roads were found in its vicinity Numerous pits and two wells were found amongst the buildings. One of these pits contained one or more burials and the following burial offerings: black-glazed open vessels, lamps, a squat lekythos, bronze and iron artefacts and a piece of litharge. Additional finds from the area of the buildings include coarse and fine ware sherds, pyramidal loom weights, coins, lead artefacts and querns. Cemeteries: A Geometric cemetery was excavated. 9 pit burials were found along with an amphora, an oinochoe and a kantharos. A second Archaic-Classical cemetery was excavated containing 8 inurned cremations in pithoi and amphorae, and 4 pyres. The pyres were set in rectangular, rock-cut pits where black-glazed lekythoi had also been placed. Finally, a Classical cemetery was excavated containing 2 in-urned cremations in pointed amphorae, 1 tile grave, 1 cist grave, 1 small terracotta larnax and 1 pyre. The votive offerings from this cemetery include black-glazed vessels, black-figure lekythoi and a red-figure chous. Byzantine remains: 2 cist graves containing numerous Byzantine burials were found. In addition a Byzantine cistern was excavated. Numerous other structures were found in the area: pits, cairns, walls and enclosures. The following archaeologists worked at the site: P. Michailidou, E. Papafloratou, E. Tselepi, I. Speliotakopoulou and H. Tsonos. The plans were drawn by A. Kermali.

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Keratea, Works on Kerateas-Anavyssou St. A. Ntova (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discoveries of a Roman workshop with a kiln at the Togani location, a Classical inurned cremation of a young child, an early Bronze Age settlement at the Mokriza location (Fig 1), a Classical to Roman farmstead, and a marble statue of a boy holding a hare. D. Parras participated in the excavation.

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Lykouriza, Patroklou St. (O.T. 646, property of G. Kavalari) A. Ntova (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two Roman burials (Fig 1). Burial 1: Tile grave dated in Late Roman times containing a phiale and a miniature jug (Fig 2). Burial 2: Tile grave containing two skeletons and two additional crania. It also contained a pair of bronze earrings. The burials should be associated with the nearby Roman (1st-5th A.D.) farmstead, which was excavated in 1974. It appears that the Mesogaia accommodated numerous, large, Roman farmsteads. E. Konstantinidou worked on the excavation under the supervision of A. Ntova.

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Lavrion, Panormos (Gaïdouromantra) (property of General Marketing Hellas, O.T. 9) E. Andrikou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a 3rd-4th c. A.D. cemetery. In total 78 pit graves were found. The skeletons were in supine position. Burial 12 contained 40 coins. Another 21 coins were found in the other graves. D. Parras participated in the excvation and undertook study of the material for publication.

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Lavrion, Ary, ore enrichment complex. K. Tsaimou (ΕΜΠ) reports on further investigation of the Lavreotiki washeries. Ary III: The large Π-shaped, type 1 level washery was fully excavated as well as Rooms A and Γ (Fig 1). A carefully constructed wall forms the north side of rooms A, Γ, Δ, Ε and the Π-shaped washery (Fig 1, 3).  The latter had four drain openings. Room A (10.70x6.50 m.) is identified as the place where the ore was broken. Three limestone slabs were found in it and identified as the slabs used for doing this. An elongated space runs along the north side of room A (Figs 2, 4). There was a door with pilasters on either side of it leading from the elongated space to the room. Four square and circular pits filled with stones were found in the room. Its floor was made of beaten earth as was the floor of room Γ.  The later was entered too via a door with pilasters on both sides. Room Γ inclines slightly towards the south. Two more rooms were excavated north of the courtyard: Δ and E. A mortar-lined drain runs from the SE corner of room Δ. In addition a small cavity was found between room Δ and the washery (Fig 5). Further west of the Π-shaped washery lays a five-room complex (12.30x7.50 m), which stands 0.60 m. higher than the washery and has a N-S orientation (Fig 1). It consists of rooms Z, H, Θ, K and I. The walls of room H are lined with hydraulic concrete. Workshop for smelting argentiferous ores (Figs 6, 7): The workshop was surveyed in 2007. Three cupellation furnaces were revealed (φ5, φ6, φ7) and one was fully investigated (φ5). C14 dating of material found in the furnace shows that it dates in Roman times (Fig 8). The layout of the workshop is identical to all such workshops in Lavrion. The cupellation furnaces were placed at a lower level from the supply area (Fig 9). The furnaces in this workshop were cylindrical, 3-4 m. high and their diameter measured 1 m. The position of the furnaces was delimited by large boulders (Fig 10). In addition, two cavities are discernible in the rooms with furnaces, one marking the location of the furnace and a second marking the place where the melting metal would pour into (Fig 10). Staircases were found adjacent to the walls separating the furnaces. Finds from the workshop include slags, litharge, charcoal, roof-tiles and Roman pottery sherds. The workshop and Ary III were parts of the same metallurgical facility (Fig 11), and were most likely owned by the same “entrepreneur”. After chemical analyses, it appears that the furnaces were used in the Roman period for the smelting of litharge and the production of lead.

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Marathon, Skorpio Potami, Plataion St. (property of M. Kalemi) E.S. Mpanou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of a Classical building; possibly a farmstead. A wall, a hearth, pottery sherds, and roof tiles were found. The architectural remains date in the 5th c. B.C. The excavation was conducted by Th. Tzeferi.

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Marathon, Arnos, Eu. Panagopoulou St. (property of B. Tsantouli) E.S. Mpanou (Β’ ΕΠΚΑ) reports on the discovery of two Late Roman farmsteads. Walls, 2 marble slabs, roof-tiles, numerous pottery sherds (including combed sherds), a lamp and a bronze Roman coin were found. The excavation was conducted by Th. Tzepheri. 

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